Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    Well, I just got through with emails to Frank and it turns out he has a distributor in San Francisco that will be sending them to me. A very nice turn of events and even nicer to get that sill stuck plug out of my case. I was not looking forward to always having to remove valve covers to make adjustments.
  2. locorider

    locorider Loco, pero no estúpido!

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    See that in the original position, you are pushing. In the inverted position, you are pulling. I dont know if there is any advantage, other than if you push hard, the brake rod might tend to bend and absorb the energy...

    [​IMG]

  3. locorider

    locorider Loco, pero no estúpido!

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    Another view


    [​IMG]
  4. locorider

    locorider Loco, pero no estúpido!

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    Good to know!

  5. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    Carlos, looking at the mechanism in close detail and how the cam applies force to the pads, either a push or pull fashion gives equal loading, as that is based on the fulcrum at the pedal. However I did notice that you had applied a rubber coating over the arm to prevent rubbing and banging on the swing arm as I can see that under a vertical or "bouncing load" you could hit the arm and damage the paint. I just bent mind a tad bit further out and if I hear any banging or see and damage I will coat mine as well. Here is a cool older modification I found of how a racer configured his bike. Seems this idea and worry about damaging the lever arm hanging down has been around for awhile.

    [​IMG]

    I still liked how you did it and feel comfortable with using a reverse from the OEM configuration.

    As I did not post up pictures above, here are two quick snaps taken this morning before work:

    [​IMG]

    Now its like the jigsaw puzzle in making sure I get all the pieces back in the right order I took them off!

    [​IMG]
  6. Dudley

    Dudley Been here awhile

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    Rick did do an excellent job on my T/A's forks so I'll stick with Cogent when I order out the shock. I plan on overhauling the rear suspension links at the same time.
    Dudley
  7. locorider

    locorider Loco, pero no estúpido!

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    I use epoxy, like West System. Is harder than resin and fiberglass. I did the mods on my bike on 2008-2009 and everything is in place, no cracks. With their pump system, you dont have to measure. Down side: expensive.
  8. locorider

    locorider Loco, pero no estúpido!

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    My first post, August 29, 2006, Post 12445...and I've been enjoying it since!
  9. Santa

    Santa Focused on the Future

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    The brake rod always pulls the lever on the hub forward.
    There is no push. Go press the brake and see.

    Mounting the lever on the hub above the swingarm gives clearance and a measure of protection from damage you might get say riding in a rut or splitting the gap betwen two rocks on a trail.

    Unless you are using the TA in extreme off road conditions this is not needed.
    I think the interference between the rod and swingarm causes more issues than if you just run it as stock in the low position, especially with long travel suspension.
  10. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    True in the OEM configuration...however, when you look inside and observe the mechanical operations of the drum breaks...whether you pull or push makes no difference. By inverting the lever, you loose no ability in function or performance on the brake mechanism itself. Rattling and banging of the control rod against the swing arm is a potential, but function will not be affected as the mechanical leverage is preserved.
  11. Santa

    Santa Focused on the Future

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    Indeed so due to the design of the actuating mechanism.
    Continue onward.
  12. locorider

    locorider Loco, pero no estúpido!

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    You are right! Thanks!
  13. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    There was discussion on the 250 shock mod and orientation with regards to the banjo being on the outside towards the tire, or oriented towards the engine. Concern was room inside the air box. Sorry if this is hard to see, but there is a 1/2" space between the banjo and the case of the air box. Where the reservoir hose extends, it may look like its bound up, but that is just how the canister is hanging off the bike. When I put it in its mounting place, there is no contact.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is that chip I was talking about on the access port for the stator. My replacement LiMaCap-2 upgrade is slated to be delivered today. Turns out Frank has a distributor in San Francisco for these items which means no overseas shipping, instead just $5.00 USPS.

    [​IMG]

    Well, we seem to be talking about it enough, here is the close up of the rear break linkage as she sits now.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    On a good note: TGIF!

    Eric
  14. Bonnie & Clyde

    Bonnie & Clyde Wishing I was riding RTW

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  15. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    That really seems like a sketchy deal right there. If he really did register it as a 1980 GL1000...well you may end up donating it to the USG if caught.
  16. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Purely based on climate - If I were importing a bike from europe my priorities would be

    1. Italy
    2. German
    3. France
    27. UK

    I've seen too many UK restoration threads. Their winter roads eat metal of all kinds. Things from brake calipers to the inside of the rims, nuts, bolts, electrical connections etc. All these thing should be looked at.

    I'f I'm buying a bike that I have to tear all the way down first and then put back together again $10K is about '$6K too much even for an AT.

    Suspect reg. would be another headache. Donna Leak can quickly get your AT legally tagged (even in California) for a very reasonable fee.
  17. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    That last tid bit of information is interesting on registration of the bike. May be of interest looking into that for a new bike? This little gem caught my eye last year...the Honda Crosstour

    [​IMG]

    Its a dream at this point, but depending on costs maybe not a to far off dream?
  18. WeeBee

    WeeBee Roaming ADV Gnome

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    Why bother - it's a Street Bike very thinly disguised as an Adventure Bike.
  19. potski

    potski Wiley Wanderer

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  20. Dr E

    Dr E Chasing after theory

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    This would not be a replacement to the TA, just another bike for varied two up riding through BC, Victoria Island, the San Juan Islands and around the PNW with the wife. I can do that on the TA, but a little more get up and go.