Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. happyclam

    happyclam Been here awhile

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    Apr 25, 2011
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    167
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    Trapped in Maryland
    What's the total horsepower?[​IMG]:rofl:roflSorry, couldn't resist.
  2. mgorman

    mgorman Crashing since 1964

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    Oct 25, 2006
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    5,326
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    Massillon, Ohio

    From what I have understood, (and I could be totally wrong) cush drives and rubber dampers in CS sprockets were put on bikes to keep the transmissions and clutch baskets from being torn up from shock fed though the chain drive when the tire has plenty of grip. On a dirt bike, the tire is always in some state of slip but on a road bike, all the shock waves from the road and motor get transmitted through the parts with slop in them such as transmission teeth and the ears on clutch plates which are much softer than gears. Once you have those dents beat into the basket, the tabs want to ride there instead of moving on an even plane causing either drag from not being able to move apart or slipping under power from not being able to slide back together until the power is let off. (I think I typed that right :huh) I did have to file one basket to get it smooth so my clutch would work properly, I believe it was my KTM 495

    It also dampens chain snatch and from what I have read, helps eliminate spline wear on the coutershaft sprockets. Some bikes had spring dampers in the clutch baskets also. I switched to a solid JT on my 950 and it feels like there is much more unwanted vibes coming through so I will be going back to a dampened unit when I replace the chain.

    One of the articles I read years ago talked about testing their motocross engines (I believe it was KTM) in street bikes because the wear and tear on them would be more dramatic per hour than if they tested them off-road. One of those items they were testing for was drive train durability due to riding on pavement.

    There is a lot of force going through those parts. My 86 Can-Am 560 Sonic used to eat swing arm [needle] bearings on the drive side. They didn't rust or seize, the outer race would literally be pounded thin like smashing a penny in one of those souvenir machines or under the wheel of a train and expand almost a 1/4 wider than new. I found a way to get 2 narrower bearings from a Husky which added up to a wider width a to fit in the space allotted with a little modification. I never had to replace the non drive side. The rear wheel also had 2 bearings on the drive side vs one on the non-drive side.

    My TA's chain is getting due for replacement so I'll find out soon what those splines look like. One thing I do know is none of my Euro bikes use the keyed keeper to hold on a floating sprocket, they are all fastened solid via retaining nuts. All my XRs and XLs prety much have had the same spline/sprocket set up




    .
  3. Thunder Dan

    Thunder Dan Been here awhile

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    Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia
    Thanks for that. That's pretty good fuel consumption numbers considering the load & speed.
    Yep, the old engines use oil. No two ways about it.

    Cheers,

    Dan. :D
  4. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    That's maybe a bit high but what are "freeway speeds" for you?

    Pull the airbox drain plug down by the CS sprocket. I bet you'll find most of your oil there. Be ready for at least a coffee cup full of water and oil to come out so don't do this on a nice floor.
  5. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    Wausau
    +2^^^^^^

    That equals about a liter in 1200 miles.......high speed and higher temps I would consider totaly normal for a TA.
  6. ghulst

    ghulst Adventurer

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    How did you make the screen?
  7. K4yakk0

    K4yakk0 Adventurer

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    Jan 7, 2005
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    36
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    Italy, Lucca
    This is the way i build the screen and the other parts


    First I shaped a block of foam
    [​IMG]

    than i covered it with scotch tape and put fiber glass and epoxy resin.
    [​IMG]

    The parts before cutting and painting
    [​IMG]
  8. Jim Rowley

    Jim Rowley Rise above

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    Black Forest, Colorado
    :thumb:clap
  9. ghulst

    ghulst Adventurer

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    Netherlands
    Looks good. But did you shape the windscreen the same way? It looks smoother and see-through. Nice work btw. Looks awesome.
  10. TRBaron

    TRBaron Been here awhile

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    Jan 21, 2013
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    Grafton NSW Australia
    Freeway is anything over 110kph, usually at least 120kph.

    RPM between 5500 and 6000.
  11. ravelv

    ravelv from Baltic side of river

    Joined:
    May 13, 2008
    Oddometer:
    444
    :)

    Many of old CDI's have this problem... I think, more powerfull spark at higher RPM's is reason fuel is burned less.
    Another one is ignition advance- stock CDI's have it for 91 fuel, which I cannot even get here... Mostly we have 95 and 98. These aftermarket CDI's allow to use normally also 95-98 (I now use only 98, because this fuel does not have these "biological" and "green" (*(&^*&%^*&!) additives...).

  12. Transalp1999

    Transalp1999 Adventurer

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    Nov 4, 2012
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    SVG, EWR
    Check out this link to determine what ratio works best for you.

    http://www.gearingcommander.com/
  13. bartender

    bartender Jack of all trades

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    Mar 27, 2008
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    83
    Location:
    Chi-Town
    I got my hands on an semi-torn down 89 TransAlp over the weekend, and after some time in the garage putting all the bits back together, it started up like a champ. I'm actually a bit on the fence about the bike, mostly because my favorite bikes have always been air cooled, had kickers, and were mostly devoid of plastic. With that said, I've been kicking around the idea of trading for an XR600R, but the more I think about it, the more I want to keep it and build it up.

    So, I've been making my way through this incredibly long thread and must say you guys have compiled a serious volume of great information here. Thank you!

    My plans at first:
    19" front wheel - this bike will be almost strictly for commuting
    18" rear wheel
    Upgraded rear suspension - I've worked with Klaus at EPM on some shocks previously, so I may go that route. I'm 6"3' and all legs, so I'd like to kick the height up a bit. In this regard, can I just order a longer than stock shock, or should I pick up either an RD03 or RD04 rear swingarm and knuckle and then order a shock to match those components?
    Upgrade front suspension - Is there a preference between XRR and XRL front ends?

    Once these bits are sorted out, I'll get to work on more of the aesthetic changes.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  14. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    I do not see a cost benefit on the wheel change. Especially on the rear.......I get the more street orientation front.......but still question it in real world commuting as the TA can do that all day with stock wheels. Just thinking out loud..........
  15. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Welcome Bartender,

    It looks like a nice example of a TA.

    I'm a bit confused by your plans. I don't know why you'd want to go the expense of changing out the front rim for a smaller size (there are many good street tires available for the 21 in rims) and then talk about raising the front suspension.

    Also moving to an 18 in the rear will increase your selection of off-road tires but will restrict your selection of street oriented tires.

    Dropping the pegs down a bit makes the TA much more comfortable for people with longer legs.

    If you do indeed remove the front rim (and it's free of corrosion) let me know. I may be interested in buying it from you.

    If used on the street, I'd not go through the trouble of a swingarm swap. The rear drum brake is quite adequate for the street.
  16. Z_HARSH

    Z_HARSH Like margarine?

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    Denver
  17. Spina

    Spina wannabe motorcyclist

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2011
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    88
    Location:
    Milano, Italy
    as I already said: the mechanic adjusted the idle ( 1200rpm at idle, at temperature ) but the other morning was cold and the bike struggled to start.
    I started it with the choke open, it was fine, but I couldn't close the choke
    I had to set the idle a little higher and I managed to run the bike with the choke closed, but the bike run badly at low rpm anyway. I have to check for the carbs membranes maybe...
    In the meantime I'll try to clean the airfilter and the sparkplugs.

    Anyway, Let's suppose that I don't know anything about maintenance. Just for a joke...*coff*
    I took this photos of the bike, I'm a little afraid of the rust, especially for rear wheel axle, rims and frame: could this be a problem? I'm at risk for something? D: Could the rust have weakened the material, or it's just external usually?

    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/521/img20130408192321.jpg/
    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/4/img20130408192330.jpg/
    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/62/img20130408192420.jpg/
    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/259/img20130408192404.jpg/
    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/20/img20130408192432.jpg/
    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/834/img20130408192427.jpg/
    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/9/img20130408192348.jpg/


    I'm thinking of cleaning nuts, rims and spokes it with wd40, does this will work or it would weaken the pieces?

    (again, sorry for the english )
    Thanks!
  18. bartender

    bartender Jack of all trades

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    Mar 27, 2008
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    Chi-Town
    Any know what shrouds these are? Are they custom or from some other bike?

  19. K4yakk0

    K4yakk0 Adventurer

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    Jan 7, 2005
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    36
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    Italy, Lucca
    Some years ago i saw that mod and i look on the web to find some similar to adapt but i didn't find anithing right, so i build the shrouds in aluminium, than in fiberglass.
  20. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,114
    Location:
    Davis, CA
    Spina,

    Your cold start and choke problem is probably due to the same level of surface rust/corrosion evident in most of the bike.

    Carefully remove the choke valves (10mm wrench but the covers are plastic and soft)from the carbs and check that they slide in and out easily without sticking. Then lubricate the choke cable and pay particular attention to the place where the choke cable splits from one into two.

    The rust problem appears to be on the surface only but it's very difficult to tell with only photos. A few photos of the complete bike would be helpful.

    It appears the bike was ridden either through a few wet winters with salted roads or stored outside near the ocean. WD40 may help with freeing nuts and bolts but not as a cure for the rusting. Cleaning and replacement of some fasteners may be necessary.

    As a safety point, I would take a careful look at the wheel rims. You will have to remove tire and tube and pay particular attention to the area around the valve stem. We have all seen TA wheels that looked OK on the outside only to find very heavy corrosion on the inside with almost no metal left in some areas.