Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. NORTH RIDER

    NORTH RIDER Been here awhile

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    Nov 4, 2007
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    757
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    THUNDER BAY,ONT CANADA
    thank you .looks like there is a lot of great info there.
    I'll post a photo of the bike when ( if ) i get it

    thanks

    north rider
  2. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    Not trying to dampen your enthusiasm but you might like to review this link, there were quit a lot of changes from the 88 model vs 89 US model bikes, most are engine related. It may not be important but you should be aware of this for future reference.

    http://www.ta-deti.de/ta/mods.html

  3. R_Rick

    R_Rick Been here awhile

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    I believe you will find that the 88 is closer to the 87 than to the 89 .... just different enough that you have to check and double check when ordering parts out of the US to ensure things will work. :deal
  4. NORTH RIDER

    NORTH RIDER Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2007
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    757
    Location:
    THUNDER BAY,ONT CANADA
    thanks for all the help guys.

    I'm not even sure what year it is. i bought it unseen . it looked like a good deal . I'll probably end up selling it or it will be used on gravel roads in order to save my AFRICA TWINS.
    I'm not worried about engine parts it only has about 21,000klms.mostly i want to replace some ( or all plastics ) and for that i always go to German eBay.

    thanks

    north rider
  5. Thunder Dan

    Thunder Dan I don't like wallabies...

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  6. happyclam

    happyclam Been here awhile

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    I knew you'd say that. Thanks. I'll start saving.
  7. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Dan,

    Thanks for that. I didn't want to slam the K&N but I can't find any other path the dirt would be taking. I'll not use it in future.

    Also, and this is IMPORTANT. I somehow still did not realize that the small drain plug on the bottom of the oil separator is so IMPORTANT.

    Thinking about it.......if it gets lost or knocked off on a rock, your airbox downstream of the filter is open to the outside air.:eek1

    I'm going to (a) shorten the drain tube so it's not hanging down so far and (b) put a real hose clamp on the end to make certain the plug stays put.

    Glad you mentioned it.
  8. bartender

    bartender Jack of all trades

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    Oddometer:
    83
    Location:
    Chi-Town
    So I've been going over my new 89 TransAlp and stumbled upon an oil line bolt that looks like it's one turn away from snapping off inside the head. This is precisely why everyone should always use a torque wrench when working on engines!

    Anyway, it's a 7x26.5 banjo-type bolt for the oil line to the front cylinder head, part # 90085-MF5-000. It's discontinued. A few places have it "in stock" but really they don't, and will refund you when you order it.

    Anyone have any ideas as to where to find a new one?

    Thanks
  9. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Try the over-seas guys.

    David Silver Spares from the UK

    CMS (cms.nl) in the Netherlands

    Also a really good Honda shop should be able to cross-ref that PN. I'll bet lots of other Hondas used it. Try the VT 500 twins and 700 Shadow.

    Other guys who know Hondas better should also have some suggestions.

    You can also maybe search for the part alone since other machines used banjo bolts.
  10. bartender

    bartender Jack of all trades

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    83
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    Chi-Town
    Honda used this bolt on a bunch of the small V-twins in the late 80's, including the NT650. Somehow Honda discontinued this part across the board without issuing a replacement part. Very frustrating.
  11. Jim Rowley

    Jim Rowley Rise above

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    Black Forest, Colorado
    Can it be replicated on a lathe?
  12. dani_d

    dani_d n00b

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2
    Location:
    UK
    Hello!

    I own two TA's and both of them developed weird sounds [​IMG] The first one is a 1988 Transalp, with 44k original miles(70.000 km's). The strange noise appeared around the 30k mile mark and it has gotten progressively worse.

    This is the recording, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0lh7IX0TR4

    What has been done:
    - removed valve lash (noise remains unchanged)
    - adjusted valves to specs
    - timing chain wear inspection (4.0/4.5mm front/rear, both under the 6.0mm service limit)
    - manually put more tension on the timing chains, by pushing the tensioner's blades further down. The engine sound has improved a bit, only lower pitched sounds are audible now. Rechecked the wear indicators and they now show 4.7mm, respectively 5.2mm. At the moment, I would say that the noises come 70% from the rear cylinder's timing side and 30% from the front cylinder's timing side.

    Both timing chains are the original DID's (only '87 and '88 used DID).

    ==========================

    The second one is a 1991 Transalp, with what I assume to be 70-100k miles. I can hear two distinct sounds, the "click, click" and a lower pitched one that seems to be the beginning of a timing chain rattle. For the "click, click" I can tell you that it's coming EXACTLY from the rear cylinder's exhaust downpipe.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Psv6WvcqZlY


    What has been done:
    - remove valve lash (noise remains unchanged)
    - adjust valves to specs
    - timing chain wear inspection (3.4/3.9mm front/rear, both under the 6.0mm service limit)
    - front cylinder is solid, all sounds come from the rear cylinder's timing side.

    Both timing chains are Borg Warner - Morse ('89 onwards had them)
    I have yet to manually tension the chains on this one but will do so as soon as I can and keep you posted. For both bikes I am pretty sure that a timing component is to blame but I am also thinking of small end issues, worn ring grooves, etc.

    I would like to ask you to take a listen and give me your opinion.
  13. Clockwatcher

    Clockwatcher Been here awhile

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    Nov 20, 2004
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    581
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    West Carolina
    Give my friend Rick a call at.....motocd.com.....he can help and you may not have to save as much.
    I use a Moab shock on my TA, works very well..........:clap
  14. bartender

    bartender Jack of all trades

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    Mar 27, 2008
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    83
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    Chi-Town
    Tracked down a dealer in Cincinnati that had 3 bolts in stock, so I bought all 3!
  15. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    The same bolt is used on the rear cylinder head for the same oil line.
  16. bartender

    bartender Jack of all trades

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    As far as I can tell Honda has discontinued that bolt across their entire line of engines that used it. That includes the NT650, VT500, and VT600 along with the TransAlp. I haven't been able to find a different part # from any other models either. Maybe I didn't look in the right places, who knows. I found some, so I'm cool. Thanks for the help guys.
  17. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    I meant that you might need two of them just for your bike. I still don't see why the one on your front cylinder is cracked and failing? Has someone had the oil line off? If so you might like to check the one on the rear cylinder to.

    And I agree, they make torque wrenches for a reason, you would be surprised how many Transalps I have worked on with incorrect torque values and many in the wrong direction. Oil filters installed as if they were head bolts, triple clamp bolts barely tightened, that kind of thing.
  18. bartender

    bartender Jack of all trades

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    Yep, the PO had replaced the head gasket. Naturally I don't trust others work, so I took a look to make sure everything was good, which is how I found the twisted bolt. PO had put only 1 of the 2 required crush washers on also, which is probably why he tightened the crap out of it.

    Went over the rear cylinder already, everything looks good. We'll see when the new parts arrive.
  19. GSPD750

    GSPD750 Adventurer

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    Feb 14, 2005
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    Calgary, AB
    FYI
    That's a good # with Honda Canada.


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    (90085-MF5-000) <!-- We dont do the switching as in the PSN db stuff, so we need explicit checking on what the active part is when WebService-returned fiche data. --><!-- We dont do the switching as in the PSN db stuff, so we need explicit checking on what the active part is when using SOLR XML fiche data. --></TD><TD vAlign=middle width="10%" align=right>Motorcycles <!-- WS assigned either a real category name or Multifit, i.e., did the logic earlier. --></TD><!-- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --><TD vAlign=middle align=center>Call for Price</TD></FORM></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
  20. mgorman

    mgorman Crashing since 1964

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    I would think so. If you can find the correct threaded bolt, a good drill press along with a rat tail file should be all you need to make a new bolt