Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. klausdorth

    klausdorth Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    71
    Location:
    Toon City, Ehime-ken, Japan
    Or you can handle it the way I did:

    Get Wirth progressive fork springs! My Honda TA is a 92 model and after changing the front springs - what a surprise!! At least it comes somewhat cheap, too!
  2. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,555
    Location:
    DFW TX
  3. thebigman

    thebigman bout a dollar 3.98

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,700
    Location:
    Texas Gulf Coast
  4. Jim Rowley

    Jim Rowley Rise above

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2001
    Oddometer:
    2,512
    Location:
    Black Forest, Colorado
  5. Jim Rowley

    Jim Rowley Rise above

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2001
    Oddometer:
    2,512
    Location:
    Black Forest, Colorado
    Nice job thepoddo. Nothing wrong with modifications to fit your style of riding.

    [​IMG]
  6. AlpineGuerrilla

    AlpineGuerrilla Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    399
    Location:
    Basel, Switzerland
    Last December, I bought a 1996 Transalp XL600V. I really love the simple handling and the V2 engine. :clap

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    In march I started modifying it with a friend. Our aim was to rejuvenate it, both in looks and (offroad) performance. First we started with a rised handle bar - very important for my 193cm.

    [​IMG]

    We installed this rally fairing, made by AfricanQueens based in Germany. The mounting required a bit of improvising, but we got it done. I can deliver some detailed pictures of the mount later if anyone's interested.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The next step was replacing the old suspension with some new stuff made by Hyperpro. Me like!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The first test ride with my new bike. :ricky

    [​IMG]

    The riding is great. The suspension provides a lot of feedback but it's still dampening the worst stuff. The weight is barely noticeable while riding.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    :wink:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Today I mounted some knobblies for a dirt ride this weekend. I am very much looking forward to it! So far I think I can confidently say that I could keep up with any KTM 690 with my Transalp. :D

    [​IMG]

    I still have some work to do, for example a proper bash plate, barkbusters, repainting it and a few minor tweaks.

    Oh and it's a lot less heavy now. With a full tank (~18l) and oil it weighed 210kg before the conversion, now it's only 191kg (462 to 421 pound).
  7. thepoddo

    thepoddo Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Oddometer:
    53
    Location:
    Italy
    I throughly agree
    still, after more than 2 years on the reversed rear link (something you can only do on the 650 model), and 2 months of longer shock and forks I have to say the steering geometry feels substantially unchanged and daily commute apart I already had the chance of riding the bike without any problem both on nasty mountain trails and on the tracks of the Italian Baja (after the race, obviously :D)

    I am not here to say that what I have done is a work of science, nor that I really knew what I was doing.
    Still, once I got all the parts I needed, everything has been pretty much bolt on and feels like a straight upgrade from stock

    quoted for truth, but I have to admit that after spending a lot of money on springs, valves and oils I have never found the stock forks suitable for safe riding, not even on asphalt
  8. GSPD750

    GSPD750 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,541
    Location:
    Calgary, AB
    Great pics of your countryside. And a great job putting that TA on a weight loss program. I like all your mods. I've heard alot of good from the Hyperpro products and how they transform the bike. Good job. :clap
  9. AppFan

    AppFan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    692
    Location:
    Concord NC
    I'm in the process of removing the rear shock and have gotten stuck (literally).....
    I've removed the bolts as per the manual but can't figure out how/where to slide the shock out. It's jammed in there pretty good. What simple thing am I not thinking of?

    Never mind, had a neighbor come lift the rear wheel while I kept the bike steady.
  10. Bonnie & Clyde

    Bonnie & Clyde Wishing I was riding RTW

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,977
    Location:
    Gardnerville NV
    Yep lift the wheel
  11. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,195
    Location:
    Piedmont region NC
    I knew instantly what the problem was, we all asked ourselves that question once, so what shock are you installing?
  12. AppFan

    AppFan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    692
    Location:
    Concord NC
    Hi Mark! I went with the Ohlins but am thinking they may have sent the wrong one. There's almost an inch of difference in length and not in a good way...
    I saw a reference to US/non US in another post. 8is this the issue or am I over thinking here?

    [​IMG]
  13. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,195
    Location:
    Piedmont region NC
    Looks all wrong to me..
  14. Bonnie & Clyde

    Bonnie & Clyde Wishing I was riding RTW

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,977
    Location:
    Gardnerville NV
    Ordered an Ohlins this year too! Yes thats the same one I got and it is physically shorter but dosnt sag like the stock shock. So no loss. It will perform awesome. You will just need a hardened bolt and nut as the bottom shock mount is not threaded like the stock shock. Enjoy love mine
  15. AppFan

    AppFan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    692
    Location:
    Concord NC
    Thank God! Thanks. I noticed the need for a new bolt last night but didn't want to pick it up til I knew if I had the right one. I feel much better now. Glad to hear you like it!
  16. Bonnie & Clyde

    Bonnie & Clyde Wishing I was riding RTW

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,977
    Location:
    Gardnerville NV
    I got a hardened nut and bolt at ACE with jut the perfect amount of length for the nut to thread on with out hitting the swing arm linkage. Sorry didnt measure it or right it down (i found metric one so no odd tools in the kit) . Just take the shock to the hardware store. Find a hardened bolt that fits the shock U mount and leaves enough room for the nut to fully thread on and use blue lock tight.
    [​IMG]
  17. AppFan

    AppFan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    692
    Location:
    Concord NC
    Thanks. I'm stuck at the in-laws today but will hit the Tractor Supply store in the morning.
  18. dualdogdave

    dualdogdave In Pursuit of Excellence in Motorcycling

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    150
    Location:
    Santa Cruz Mountians
    :stupid I'm a bit embarrassed to announce what the origin of the mystery bolt is that was responsible for the de-railment of the TransHawk oil pump drive chain.


    [​IMG]



    During my original exploratory inspection and dis assembly of the primary drive mechanism I simply slid the clutch pack off of its shaft and set it to the side so as to not disturb the assembly sequence of its many parts with the outside face up. I never really examined it focusing on the crankcase area looking for clues to see where that screw may have come from.

    Today I decided to change out the discs in the TransHawk clutch pack.

    Upon picking it up for the first time to begin the dis assembly I flipped it over and exposed the origin of the mystery bolt. :umph


    [​IMG]




    In the Honda Manual they call this part of the clutch pack the clutch outer.

    Also the Honda Manual and the Honda Microfiche shows no bolts like the TransHawk has. :pissed the manual shows only rivets in that location.

    Honda must have had trouble like I did with the bolts in early models and changed to rivets after the TransHawk was built.

    I took a look at the Transalp clutch in the manual and they are riveted as well, so no worries there.

    The take away here is that when we are working on our clutches, look for bolts or rivets and be sure if you have bolts on the clutch outer make certian that they are correctly torqued with Locktite.




    [​IMG]



    The torque plate on the TransHawk Clutch outer was damaged when the second of the three retaining bolts backed out and snagged the oil chain tweaking the torque plate and then shucking the oil pump drive chain pins and links off into the sump and ultimately de-railing the chain.




    [​IMG]



    So I have been on the phone with my preferred Honda dealer to order a new clutch outer assy. w/ rivets $260.62 USD discounted from $358.98

    I should have everything later next week.



    Stay tuned..................



    .
  19. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,555
    Location:
    DFW TX
    Dave, that's really good news. At least it was nothing deep internal. a few bucks, a little work, and a lot of peace of mind. :thumbup
  20. AppFan

    AppFan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Oddometer:
    692
    Location:
    Concord NC
    Got out of familial obligations early and got my bolt (its a 10, 1.25 by the way).
    Thanks for everyone's help. I didn't measure before and after ride heights or have time for a ride yet but Hotmamaandme's experience with the same shock makes me feel better.
    Now to try to schedule slipping the Intiminators that have been sitting in the garage for the past couple months in the front shocks..... I'm sure I'll be back with more questions then!