Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. ravelv

    ravelv from Baltic side of river

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    Honestly, I like more rubber ones. Why? Because rubber ones somewhat softens sharp and quick lever pressing and thus wheel locking is less likely possible in extreme situation.
    Stock single rotor brakes on TA are somewhat weak and SS lines allows press to them harder and thus getting feeling of improvement, but I think, this is not right way- proper brakes should work perfect with any type of lines. So, that's why I din't upgrade brake lines, but I upgraded to 296mm rotor and SLR650 Brembo caliper. Now even with stock rubber brake line brakes are perfectly adequate.

  2. TransAfrika

    TransAfrika Been here awhile

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    Hi i looked here :

    http://www.trwmoto.com/modelle/mrid/51/hid/37/ccm/600/typ/XL
    this is a manufactur with good quality and ABE .
    And to everybody with rubber lines, change them and then you will feel the progress. Every racing bike have them and they know why. KTM and Husaberg and many more use them as stock for there bikes.

    I changed them at a NX 650 from my wife, and now the brake performance is much better, it is not nice when you could pull the lever to the handelbar, after a long downhill part with full load on your bike.
  3. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    Obviously the SS lines do give a firmer braking sensation but I'm going to agree with Ravelv, I to prefer the rubber brake lines. The one TA that I had with stainless lines just felt like overkill with little sense of braking modulation. I'm not racing and almost never need more than two fingers on the front level to handling most all braking. The larger 316mm rotor and steel lines felt more like a "on off" brake switch, just didn't like it.

    The 91 TA that I owned did come with a one piece oem front brake hose, no cross over pipe or line connetions. This brake hose was a big improvement over the 89-90 brake lines and I thought it was the best with a much more solid feel.

    Regarding rubber brake hoses "wearing", it might be more accurate to say they can deteriorate but I haven't seen that as a problem. I have serviced a couple of dozen Transalps and have never found a brake hose to look bad or questionable. The rubber lines are filiment braided under the rubber outer surface so the risk of one "blowing" or having a sudden major failure is highly doubtful. I would always be on the look out for any signs of a bulge in any rubber hose but that is just common sense. I doubt that the brake fluid pressure inside the hose is all that high and certainly well within the hose capability. I would be far more concerned about cooling lines needing replacing than the brake hose.

    The quickest and cheapest way I have found to improve the front braking is by switching to EBC FA69HH pads. They are quiet and seem to set in quickly. I have seen rotors that were destroyed by using the wrong pad compound and these work fine for me. Not sure how they would work at race speeds but I don't ride that way.

    Since you will have the brake system drained it would be a perfect time to overhaul the caliper as well to obtaining the most efficient braking system that you can have. Rusted and/or pitting caliper cups and dried out seals will hinder how well the caliper functions, something that a different brake fluid line won't cure.
  4. ravelv

    ravelv from Baltic side of river

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    My present brake setup allows me to lock front wheel quite easy with two fingers on lever and full load if I want to. Alone I'm not using more than one finger usually. And that's with 296mm rotor (though, with much better Brembo caliper than TA's Nissin. Brembo also have one piston bigger)!
    With SS line this setup would be difficult to use as mas335 wrote.
    So, no point to change brake lines for me. As I said, SS line is a kind of remedy, but not completely solves problem in its root- weak front brake by design. It is recognised also by Honda as from 1997 TA's have dual rotor setup in front.



    And NX650 stock brakes are not shinning as well like TA's stock ones...

  5. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    fwiw, I have owned a few NX650's and am always impressed with those factory front brakes, wish the TA worked that well but the NX is a considerable lighter bike and easier to stop.
  6. Tachedoutoffroad

    Tachedoutoffroad Mr. Parrish

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    I just love the sweet rear drum brake.
    Who needs hydraulic lines????










    :rofl
  7. Z_HARSH

    Z_HARSH Like margarine?

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    jamie92j Nice Work!

    ..............Tachedoutoffroad.........HA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Squeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeekkkkk!!!!!!


    The RaceTech springs come in kg/mm and not nm, according to a conversion I found online .56nm = 57.1 kg/mm. But, RaceTech offers up to 52 kg/mm springs for the 48mm WP forks and I have not researched other manufacturers. I had a pair of 43mm WPs with 48kg/mm springs that were way too soft, I was going to put in the brand new 50s I bought (heaviest offered for the 43mms) but found that the shim plates in the bottom came unscrewed and came out in 50 pieces, so the forks were not worth fixing. But that just means I have a pair of twin cartridge 48mm WPs on their way....

    Do you have a steering stop yet? I just welded one up like the KTMs.

    I like my EBC 320mm rotor kit, braided steel line, and stock KTM Brembo caliper.

    Klaus at HyperPro should be able to finally make me a rear shock for the full RD07 rear end (triangle too) I am running at the end of the month, it drops the swing arm by about 4 inches and balances the forks out nicely and should hopefully get me about a foot of travel, and its not all chopped out and squatty in the back like it was. Needed to add a chain roller though.

    I went with a 1.65 front rim, if you like hitting rocks at full speed it might be better to stay narrow.


    -Zach




  8. SScratch

    SScratch Somewhat Tolerable

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    I am also implementing the poor man's abs system. You know, hosing down the rotor and drum with WD40. Gets rid of the squeaks too.
  9. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    Well since you brought that up........I didn't like the rear disc brake on that 91 bike, sure it looked cool but it took too much foot pressure to get the brake working. With that much pedal pressure I lost the "feel" for what the brake was actually doing. Maybe I just needed to get used to it, maybe try different pads, not sure.

    For as poor as the TA drum brake is I can at least get within a fraction of locking it up and know where I am in the braking process.
  10. happyclam

    happyclam Been here awhile

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    Hey Zach, Can you post a pic of your chain roller. I just took off my slider and ground 3/16 out of it to alleviate some tension. It was the chain noise that inspired me.(new did) I had added the shock spacer to match xrl front forks, hence the increased angle. It's quieter, but still noisy. Hope it's not something else.The chain slack is not the problem.
  11. Thunder Dan

    Thunder Dan Been here awhile

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    G'day Jamie,

    4th TransAlp, where have you been all this time :lol3
    I have XR600 front forks. Based on the RaceTech calculator, using the XR600 (but adding the TransAlps extra weight to the 'rider weight') it recommended 0.54 to 0.56 kg/mm
    The heaviest Teknik springs (made by Eibach) I could get were 0.54kg / mm. Running about 20 - 25mm preload, the bike has about 70-80mm static sag on the front.
    So my suggestion is working around 0.52 - 0.56kg.

    Rear shock, well, you've a few options depending on the budget:

    1. Put a spacer on the rear shock. Purely lifting the rear. Very marginal increase in effective suspension travel;
    2. Try and find a longer Showa unit that fits from an old XR or CR;
    3. Save up and get a shock made to suit.

    My suggestion is do #1 while you save for #3. You're going to have top suspension on the front, it would make sense to have an equally capable shock on the rear.

    Hope that helps.


    Cheers,

    Dan.
  12. jamie92j

    jamie92j Been here awhile

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    Il get some pics of my old transalps up when I get home

    I want a good shock on the rear to match the front, might as well go the full hog now

    Think I'm going to order some 0.56kg springs as this bike will be ridden hard off road!

    Iv already got a vara1000 for the road

    I need to get some steering stops sorted, I have a cunning plan for this!
  13. TransAfrika

    TransAfrika Been here awhile

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    Hi a custom shock has the possibility to increase the shock travel and that make sense. I will buy one from wilbers for my bike to fit with the Rd04 fork. They told me to enlarge the travel and set the spring to the bike weight.

    Did any body fit a KTM fork with two discs to a TA? Or that one from the Yamaha XT 660Z, perhaps that could be interesting for you too.
  14. ON8JU

    ON8JU Adventurer

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    Jul 15, 2012
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    Belgium
    Hi guy’s, i’m looking for a 2nd set of wheels for my 2010 XL700VA. Changing tires between off-roading and long onroad trips is a real pain.
    I’ve been looking on secondhand sites for several months, but no success yet.
    Can I buy a complete aftermarket set that fits my bike out of the box? Any experiences?
    How much should an OEM wheel set cost?
    Thanks for sharing!
  15. Z_HARSH

    Z_HARSH Like margarine?

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    happyclam -

    Sure thing, I finally have a camera again!

    Chain slack was part of my problem, by increasing the angle of the swingarm it gives you more slack so it looks like you should tighten it up, but as it compresses it will then be too tight. The chain roller helps take up the slack in the uncompressed state so the chain is not too sloppy.

    I have it apart at the moment, I actually ended up using a skateboard wheel after the chain roller I bought snapped off on my first test ride. Your bracket needs to be beefy. I can get you a picture of the tab I welded on for ideas but I pulled my swingarm to start thinking about the other issue I am running in to.

    It is still chewing up the swing arm protector extremely fast so I rather than replace them every few hundred miles I need to work on something more resilient for the top of the swing arm too....

    I will post more detail in the next few weeks after I figure it out.



    "ON8JU Hi guy’s, i’m looking for a 2nd set of wheels for my 2010 XL700VA. Changing tires between off-roading and long onroad trips is a real pain.
    I’ve been looking on secondhand sites for several months, but no success yet.
    Can I buy a complete aftermarket set that fits my bike out of the box? Any experiences?
    How much should an OEM wheel set cost?
    Thanks for sharing! "


    ...used parts for a bike that new seems difficult. There are aftermarket hubs but then you will need to figure out the spacers, and make sure the discs are in the right place. Only if there is enough demand will someone have an out-of-the-box solution, so I doubt it. I'd bet a new pair of OEM wheels would be hard to find for less than 1200 Euros. I'd start at your dealer.



    "TransAfrika - Hi a custom shock has the possibility to increase the shock travel and that make sense. I will buy one from wilbers for my bike to fit with the Rd04 fork. They told me to enlarge the travel and set the spring to the bike weight.

    Did any body fit a KTM fork with two discs to a TA? Or that one from the Yamaha XT 660Z, perhaps that could be interesting for you too."

    ....I'd suppose you could look for a KTM 990 front end, seems overkill though. Your RD04 front end is built for double discs isn't it? In the US the Wilpers and the HyperPro distributor is one and the same. They say they hardly ever sell Wilbers these days. Not that it matters, thought it was interesting though.
  16. Bambi

    Bambi Been here awhile

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    Hi fellows,
    may I once again return to the brake-line-thingy?
    Firstly, the biggest problem over the years is 'growing' of the rubber-tube to the inside. You still can apply pressure to the caliper and thus to the pads, but it's takes some time to release this pressure and for the pads to leave the disc. I experienced this twice on elder cars with a combination of solid-pipe- and rubber-brake-lines. Changing the rubber-parts of the brake-lines solved the problem.
    I believe, I'm sensible enough to feel that old rubber-line grow while applying pressure on the brake-lever. I have to admit, this goes mostly to our bunch of Suzuki GN 400s from the early 80-ies, learner's bikes which weren't much cared for by most of their owners and usually still sport the original brake-lines of 1980 - 1983.
    And please bear in mind, if you discuss the pro's and con's of the lines: most of you are talking of brakes that have been up-graded in one or another way. Bigger rotors and/or better calipers, others than the original pads, with braided or rubber brake-lines. So, sorry, you're comparing apples to bananas. Brakes are very sensible systems, changing just the caliper and keeping the master-cylinder for example can lead to desastrous results!
    Sorry, no offense, but very important thoughts in my opinion!
    Last, concerning Spiegler: a close friend of mine just experienced the same with a brake-caliper that had been destroyed by the former owner of his Buell S2. Having asked for help, he gets a new, further developed one from Spiegler for a very reasonable price including the parts to upgrade the remaining caliper of his twin-disc set-up to the same level. That's simply: :clap
    Kind regards, Bambi ... sharing some bike-preferences with Ladder ...
  17. Z_HARSH

    Z_HARSH Like margarine?

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    Here is a picture of the chain roller tab I fabed up:

    <a href="http://s1235.photobucket.com/user/Z_HARSH/media/HARSH%20RALLY%20ALP/P1000001_zpsefcebc04.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/Z_HARSH/HARSH%20RALLY%20ALP/P1000001_zpsefcebc04.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo P1000001_zpsefcebc04.jpg"/></a>


    Like everything else, I just made a template out of some scrap, got it to fit the frame nicely, cut it out of a thicker plate of steel drilled the hole, and put it in a vice and hammered a bend to better align it. Then I took it to the belt sander and made it nice and pretty. Then tacked it on, straightened it up and tweaked it a little, then finished up the weld. I will post some pictures of it with the roller after I get it reassembled.

    Also been working on the side covers, morphing the seat line of the KLR with the front lines of the TransAlp. I made molds of both side covers. Then made fiberglass replicas of both. Then I let her talk to me and tell me where to put the lines. Then I cut and taped the two replicas together to come up with this:


    <a href="http://s1235.photobucket.com/user/Z_HARSH/media/HARSH%20RALLY%20ALP/P1000002_zpsd5b9e451.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/Z_HARSH/HARSH%20RALLY%20ALP/P1000002_zpsd5b9e451.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo P1000002_zpsd5b9e451.jpg"/></a>


    <a href="http://s1235.photobucket.com/user/Z_HARSH/media/HARSH%20RALLY%20ALP/P1000003_zps4f857375.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/Z_HARSH/HARSH%20RALLY%20ALP/P1000003_zps4f857375.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo P1000003_zps4f857375.jpg"/></a>


    Last night I borrowed the right KLR side cover from another inmate in town and made a mold for it....

    But this is the exciting part. Twin Cartridge, blader forks off a 2008 SX-F 250. KTMs top of the line stuff:


    <a href="http://s1235.photobucket.com/user/Z_HARSH/media/HARSH%20RALLY%20ALP/P1000004_zps8400b4f9.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff439/Z_HARSH/HARSH%20RALLY%20ALP/P1000004_zps8400b4f9.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo P1000004_zps8400b4f9.jpg"/></a>
  18. thepoddo

    thepoddo Adventurer

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    you are facing the same problems I had with my bike when I fitted ktm sxf forks
    Imade several swingarm protectors using various material including teflon and polizene, but nothing did the trick.
    In the end I had to lower the bike quite a bit, now I'll have to modify the forks to reduce the travel and avoid the front wheel hitting on the front frame stem on full compression

    btw I am using a 0.50kg/mm rated spring on my 650 and it works wonders
  19. Z_HARSH

    Z_HARSH Like margarine?

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    Thanks for the heads up! Sounds like looking for a way to make them easily replaceable without pulling the swing arm might be in order then. Or maybe a small roller above the swing arm? Lowering it is not going to happen any time soon. I guess if it was easy they would call it an ATV.
  20. mgorman

    mgorman Crashing since 1964

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    Massillon, Ohio
    Been many moons (read decades) since I did an over nighter on the Transalp. I think it goes all the way back to around '90-'91, a years or 2 after I bought it. I was going to just use the soft bags from the 640 for the trip I am on but the bike is a bit wide for the straps and I've been saying for 20+ years I was going to buy side cases. Due to racing and general being too busy, I never bought the cases or took the time to travel on it, then life changes and the 950 comes along....

    I broke down and bought a set of HB racks just before I left that according to the place I purchased them from, were compatible with my Gobi side cases. Sadly, though they fit well, not only did they send a bolt kit for some other model or year, there were no fittings for the clasps to latch onto. An hour of filing and grinding, I had fittings and saddlebags for the trip.

    Anyhow, For a bike that is 24 years old, this trip has been a real surprise in how well this old beast can haul the mail on the back roads fully loaded. Since they raised the freeway speed limit to 70, it needs 6th gear really bad, otherwise, 5,500 RPM @ 65 MPH, about the same as the 5 speed 640. Horsepower is way down compared to the 950 but it comes on 1500 RPM sooner, nearly as smooth as a 4 cylinder and about as quiet as new car.

    The downside is the fuel tank that goes dry way too fast. In the back country, when you get to 150 miles, there better be a gas station within the next 25. With the 950, I got spoiled and only stopped for gas once or twice a day instead of every 2-3 hours.

    (Ignore the Initials, I borrowed a few accessories from her younger cousin)

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