Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. MrBas

    MrBas n00b

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  2. TRBaron

    TRBaron Been here awhile

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    Well I just finished talking to Gmoto [the importer] and they said that there was high demand and some shortages last year but now they should be in stock in 138/80 - 17
  3. skeptic

    skeptic Been here awhile

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    I have low mileage T/A - 11,000 miles and just had to replace a CDI module. Is there anyone stateside who repairs them? My reading of this thread leads me to believe that the primary failure mode is that thesolder junctions fail and require resoldering after removal of the potting material.
  4. mas335

    mas335 xendurist

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    I don't know of anyone in the US who repairs them. Repairing them is hit or miss, I have had quite a bit of electrical repair experience with vintage point to point hand wired tube amps and tried to fix a dead CDI. Even though I found several weak solder points and repaired them it still didn't work.

    Just getting the back off without damaging anything and then scraping all the rubber sealant off the circut board without scratching it was labor intensive. If you make it that far you then need to fabricate a water tight cover for the CDI and seal it all back up.

    I would just buy a new CDI and pass on repairing a 25 year old CDI. Unless someone wanted to repair them for fun the labor time/cost plus shipping both ways would be a big chunk of the cost towards a imported non Honda brand CDI which most of us are very happy with. They tend to run around $70.00 to $85.00


    [​IMG]
  5. Galba

    Galba Adventurer

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    For the handguards I solved in this way


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  6. Galba

    Galba Adventurer

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    For the center stand and crashbar can take this

    http://www.ebay.it/itm/PARAMOTORE-G...i_e_Accessori_Moto&hash=item4ace17d04d&_uhb=1

    http://www.ebay.it/itm/transalp-198...i_e_Accessori_Moto&hash=item3f2ab6130f&_uhb=1
  7. Spina

    Spina wannabe motorcyclist

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    Thanks, but for a lower price I could get the ones from heavyduties.ro I'll probably by from them at least the crashbars, and I will probably build this http://tecnica.transalp.it/ricambi_access_mod.php?id=33. Not as effective as the fixed center stand, but it gets the work done.
    But first, I have to spend some money to replace the steering bearings, they're beginning to be a big safety problem : ( , so the crashbars will have to wait...
  8. TransAfrika

    TransAfrika Been here awhile

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    Hi i looked to this link and think a thing like this
    [​IMG]
    would work for you better and saver like the selfmade one, when the bike moves and crashs on you i think thats no fun..

    The stands are cheap to get used or new my costs 20 euro i bought it for my wifes bike, and works pretty well.
  9. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    I like that folding bi-pod stand. You could probably even make it from alloy. For light weight on the trail, this works.... http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=22621976&postcount=15733 . I didn't want to add the weight of a real center stand.... but this thing is so dang heavy now, I'm not sure it matters anymore. :huh
  10. Spina

    Spina wannabe motorcyclist

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    Thanks! Added to the project folder! : )
  11. jwb

    jwb Local minimum

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    Nice. The Tusk handguards can't be mounted below the crossbar like your Acerbis guards. The geometry just doesn't work. I like your flipped throttle, except for losing the kill switch.
  12. ghulst

    ghulst Adventurer

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    I have been riding my XL600V (US spec model '89) for almost a year now. Over the past couple of months, I have been using it as a commuter as well and I have found that its major shortcoming is its power. As our limits are around 75-85 on the highway, the Transalp is not the ideal bike to have to accelerate out of a tricky situation.

    Anyway, I like the TransAlp, but I would like to improve on it. What would be a number of easy and cheap improvements I can make to the Alp to make me enjoy it better? I mostly use it on paved roads, but in time would like to take it on a longer journey and off road as well.

    Any suggestions very welcome.



    (Oh, and the Alp in question.)
    [​IMG]
  13. selah

    selah Crestone

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    Sadly it is time to sell the Africa Alp. This is one of the early Transalp to Africa Twin conversions. Jeff's modification of the bike is chronicled in the "Show us your Transalp Modifications" starting around post #740

    I just posted in the flea market. Making it available to you all before I list it elsewhere.

    [​IMG]
  14. TransAfrika

    TransAfrika Been here awhile

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    Hi , i think modding is a fine thing it makes the bike individual. When you take the time like i does and look from beginning to the end of the thread you will find many usefull ideas and solutions for many problems. The cheap way is a relative cause what is cheap..... mostly i recovered that only cheapness is not even the best, some parts make big improvement but are not realy cheap, for example a better brake or new progressive fork springs a new spring ora compl. new suspension for the rear exaust system and so on .... .
    Best is you tell us what you want to go better, and what exactly you wish for, then we can help .

    Ride on.
  15. nevgriff64

    nevgriff64 Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Picked this up earlier in the week. :clap

    [​IMG]

    Decided to strip it down so I could give it a good clean/check over and service what was needed.

    [​IMG]

    Found a few little things that will need attention but all in all, pretty good condition for a 1987 model. :clap

    [​IMG]

    Now, back to page one of this thread to find out what to do with it. :huh
  16. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

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    Nice pickup Nev.
  17. ghulst

    ghulst Adventurer

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    I have been reading a lot of this thread. It is amazing to see the number of options that are in here. On the other hand, it is so much and some of it so radical, that I was wondering what some of you would recommend as some of the best options in your opinion.
  18. jwb

    jwb Local minimum

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    I find the appearance of these mint 25-year-old TAs disturbing! Good finds, folks.
  19. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Reading your first post I understand that your main concern is better power from the bike to improve roll-on speeds on the highway and you want to go from 80 mph or so on up....quickly.

    If those are your parameters.....and I HATE to be harsh about it....but the solution is to get another bike.

    The TA torque peak is at around 6000 rpm. Above that acceleration is slow. The TA was designed to be an all-round and off-road vehicle and blazing highway power was NOT a design consideration.

    We can tell you how to improve range, suspension, wind protection etc. but getting the power that you seem to require out of the TA engine is realistically NOT going to happen.

    Sorry if that's disappointing but believe me, it's realistic.
  20. jwb

    jwb Local minimum

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    What's the dingus above the swingarm pivot on the right side?