Sibirsky Extreme 2012 - The Toughest Ride of Them All

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by Colebatch, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. ecarnell

    ecarnell Been here awhile

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    So looks like everyone got a good soaking of rain. Anyones gear kept them 100% dry (minus pants from water crossings)? Did KLIM/gortex stand up?

    Great report btw!
  2. ROD CURRIE

    ROD CURRIE Been here awhile

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    Maybe, but for some reason they aren't attracted to soaking, middle aged smelly overlanders. Bizarre really. :wink:
  3. ROD CURRIE

    ROD CURRIE Been here awhile

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    I think (guys?) we were all drenched through to our underwear. On the pic with the barmaid my T-shirt is still wet-and that's about 3 hours after we arrived. This is no criticism of the gear-eventually it just soaked down from the neck. The rain was torrential and unceasing, and we were riding through lots of deep standing water as well as the river crossings.
    I don't think anything would have kept it out.
  4. RozzyCat

    RozzyCat Bleeds orange

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    Erection Airways

    Up...Up... and Away! :rofl
  5. Treadless

    Treadless seeking adventure

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    :poser







    :lurk
  6. Butcho

    Butcho Been here awhile

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    Thanks for bringing us along crew! Great stuff :D
  7. Aarrff

    Aarrff Gravel Grinder

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    Read it from the beginning. What you have shared here not only gives us all inspiration but the information from your experience for this type of travel, even for those of us having been on bikes for over 50 years, is so appreciated. Thanks to all the group for taking a lot of your time to share this and wishing you all more great adventures in 2013. :clap
  8. shizzle

    shizzle Adventurer

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    So can we expect the "beaver fever" "ride report"?
    Keep it coming, great read.
  9. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    it was 4:30 pm when we were all settled into the accommodation Rod mentioned above. I thought I had a pic or two of the place, but apparently not.

    Our host shot off at one point and came back with a Dutch couple in a 4wd. They were offered another room in the compound.

    I had been looking at the weather, which had by now stopped raining. And consulting my calendar. Starting tomorrow morning, I had just 4 days to get to Irkutsk 3100 km away, to get my flight to see the girlfriend. That includes 2200 km (1400 miles) in Mongolia, about 1500 km (950 miles) of it on earthen vehicle tracks.

    I made an on the spot decision to leave the group. Immediately. I had to get to Irkutsk. And it was going to be damn tight to see I did. I had no more than 2.5 days to get to the border at Altanbulag, and I was at Olgiy in the far west of the country, 2200 km away. I quickly repacked my bags, grabbed my damp clothes that had been drying by the fire, and said farewell to Prutser and Beamster who I would not see again on this trip - they had flights booked back to Holland from Irkutsk.

    I was hoping to catch up with Rod and Terry in Irkutsk.

    To get as much headstart with my ambitious schedule as possible, I decided to leave Olgiy immediately. By 5:30pm I was refuelled and making my way through town. I had about 5 hours hard riding to Ulaangom, via a track I had nicknamed the Khotgor Track a few years ago. I had about 3 - 3.5 hours or so of daylight. I would be riding in the dark for a bit. But a mans gotta do what a mans gotta do.

    Leaving Olgiy, the track seemed in good shape:

    [​IMG]

    But there were a few mudslides over the road that were very tricky to negotiate alone. An hour or so out of Olgiy I reached a familiar sight ... a sign in the middle of nowhere that I had stickered up a couple of years previously:

    [​IMG]

    I was on a mission, and powered on making very good time as I passed the lake Achit Nuur, and the 3 yurts at its south eastern tip.

    [​IMG]

    I stopped in at the village of Khotgor and pulled into the general store to grab some chocolates and some nibbles. A petrol 4wd was there too and I asked him if he knew where I could get a few litres of fuel. I probably had enough to make it to Ulaangom, but riding alone and with darkness coming, it would be prudent to have and extra couple of litres. He said the fuel depot in Khotgor was shut, but he would sell me 5 litres for the going rate. Then he posed for a quick pic with his son.

    [​IMG]

    So with a fuel top up and an energy top up, I headed north towards the pass. I was still making good time. The pass was freezing and covered in a thick fog that severely restricted riding speeds. But it was still only around 8pm when I reached one of the two main tracks across Mongolia - known colloquially as The Northern Route. (see below)

    [​IMG]

    My aggressive riding paid off. By the time darkness fell, I was just half an hour from Ulaangom, and on a rare stretch of asphalt road. In Ulaangom, I pulled into a big hotel by the side of the road, and was directed to a garage around the back, where I met two Russian bikers, on Africa Twins, who had arrived 5 minutes before me. It was 9:30pm.

    After showering, I met the Russians in the hotel restaurant and we swapped details on road conditions ahead before I went upstairs to sleep. I wanted an early start tomorrow.

    So far I had done 300 km since Olgiy in just over 4 hours, including a fuel and food break, by riding like a complete redneck. I was being brutal with the bike, but I HAD to get to Irkutsk and catch my flight.

    My Mission to ride solo across Mongolia in 2 and a half days was ... so far so good.
  10. Icecream

    Icecream Adventurer

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    on your mum
    I know 'a mans gotta do what a mans gotta do' but, 2200 klm in 4 days over this terrain for a booty call? She must be one hell of a girl!
  11. Jettn Jim

    Jettn Jim This is Liv'n!!!

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    Go Walter GO! Man I've done this same thing a couple times too...:evil Love the speedy way your eat'n up Terra Firma! My style indeed...
  12. ciedema

    ciedema мотоциклист

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    On the road! Finally!
    That's only the riding bit - he still has to catch a flight!
  13. F1johny

    F1johny Adventurer

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    :1drinkAwesome. From a guy who rode his 1986 EZ 600 up Mt si on the closed logging roads, near Seattle. Every pic and all is so cool .Thanks.
    F1johny
  14. BIKE-R

    BIKE-R Been here awhile

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    Hello Walter,

    I recognized our stickers next to yours :)

    [​IMG]

    Sorry we couldn't meet you. I would like to personally thank you for sharing your Ride Reports which inspired me for mongolian tour.
  15. C-Stain

    C-Stain Accredited Nincompoop

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    Speaking of Beaver Fever......:lol3
  16. Prutser

    Prutser Long timer

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    At this point Walter was still waiting for his clothes to dry, before he would get back on the bike.
    With the weather condition's getting better and better he could still do quite a few km's that would help him to reach Irkutsk in time.

    [​IMG]

    After hanging my tent and bike gear to dry I grabbed my binoculars for some more birdwatching.

    [​IMG]

    This is the best picture I have from the inside of our luxurious cave.

    [​IMG]

    When I tried to make a pic of the car they used to chase tourists a local boy walked into my view finder.
    The moment a tourist car or a group of bikers would come into the town the whole family would start to panic and jump in the car. Chasing them till they could show the paper that Rod mentioned to lure them back to their Bed&breakfast.

    [​IMG]

    Rod was thinking how to swap his front sprocket for a smaller one while Tee Bee did some things to his own bike. (I think a brake pad change just like I did on Beamsters bike 10 min later).

    [​IMG]
  17. ROD CURRIE

    ROD CURRIE Been here awhile

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    Under British law he'd 've been up in front of the beak for misrepresentation, but beggars can't be choosers and we were pretty glad to have the joint as a warm stopgap.
    When the sun went down we went to hang our still soaking boots etc up in a wee room at the back with a woodburning stove, and we left them stacked around the stove and dangling from the ceiling in the heat.
    Being as cold and wet as we'd been fairly takes it out of you, and I seem to remember we all went to bed pretty early.
  18. Mehaniotis

    Mehaniotis Been here awhile

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    You went looking for adventure, didn't you? :wink:<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Personally I can relate to that adobe shack as well as the goat milking having been born and raised out in the Greek boondocks Spl? With sheep shiete oozing between my toes while walking shoeless in January's cold. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    I envy you guys but I am not sure you appreciate the native culture to its fullest......Just try to remember that what you endured for one night they on the other hand have to endure those conditions for the rest of their lives..
    Okay, Lets have some more. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
  19. ROD CURRIE

    ROD CURRIE Been here awhile

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    M.
    Please don't mistake light irony for dissatisfaction and as I've stated, we were delighted to have the accomodation. As for appreciating local culture? read on........
  20. ROD CURRIE

    ROD CURRIE Been here awhile

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    Walter had gone charging off in to the evening in the manner of a man on a mission-(there's that alliteration again-or it it something else ?..
    Mong is alive with livestock from pigmy goats right up to yaks and horses and they all wander at will. It wouldn't be unusual during the day to have to stop whilst a herd of wild-ish horses crossed in front. At least horses are somewhat predictable. Yaks are seriously dumb and can do anything-running alongside you bucking and kicking then dodging in front of you is not unusual. At night? who knows...
    We knew he'd be flying and beating the bejasus out of himself and the bike to cover the ground -almost all of which was dirt track.
    We wished him God speed whilst having no little concern for the task he'd set himself.