Sibirsky Extreme 2012 - The Toughest Ride of Them All

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by Colebatch, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. GSlite

    GSlite Bothan spy

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    271
    Location:
    Glendora, CA, USA
    How long 'til BMW Marketing orders a hit on Walter?
  2. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2005
    Oddometer:
    7,641
    Location:
    Providence, RI
    Not gonna happen. BMW wants to sell a bike that they can convince customers is ready for RTW, not one that needs to be fixed.
  3. tele-steve

    tele-steve ya' mon

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    266
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic- Rocky Mountain Edition
    :clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap
    Loving it.
  4. LGT

    LGT Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Oddometer:
    61
    Location:
    North East, Italy
    Good.
    We are ready for the third part.:lurk
  5. StepOnIt

    StepOnIt Assitoner

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,039
    Location:
    Huntsville ON.
    +1
    AND........GO..........NOW..........PLEASE........:freaky
  6. EtronX

    EtronX Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    214
    Location:
    Norway
    Mr. Colebatch I presume :-)
  7. Jaqen H'ghar

    Jaqen H'ghar Valar Morgoulis

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Oddometer:
    203
    Location:
    Bravose
    "Im going to upgrade my GPS from a GPSMAP76CSx and was thinking ZUMO until I read what you said about the montana. Would you mind telling me why the Montana is so much better? Any chance you know if it would have the same power wire as a GPSMAP76CSx?




    That's a great question Clay, I also would love to hear Walter's opinion on the Zumo vs the Montana.
    I have the Zumo 550 and I can't even upload the complete CDR from Big Dog onto it without it breaking it into 9 separate routes, but how long I have no idea. From what I gather from Walters earlier post the Montana can handle the longer routes. Do I understand that correctly Walter?
  8. 6USMC6

    6USMC6 R.I.P. Party Boss

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,753
    Location:
    The "Upper" Valley of the Shenandoah.
    Part of the advantage of the Montana is memory. It'll handle any size SD card you care to put in it. The maps available from Garmin come on 4GB cards. The Montana will take a 32G so it should handle 8 consecutive 4GB Topo Maps.

    And that's just the tip of the iceburg. I have a 660 and a Montana. There is no comparison.
  9. GRinCR

    GRinCR Oppressed Nomad

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2011
    Oddometer:
    326
    Location:
    Alajuela, Costa Rica via MN.
    :clap:clap:clap:clap:clapStanding O! :clap:clap:clap:clap:clap
  10. roscoau

    roscoau Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    590
    Location:
    Pambula, NSW
    I did... I was wondering if you needed a bongo ride for the rail crossings?
  11. crimbo

    crimbo Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Oddometer:
    31
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Sorry Rod, can you elaborate, my good man - is this signature because you are no longer on the trip or is it now your signature perpetually post "BongoGate"?
  12. Erik RS

    Erik RS Three Wheel Maniac

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Oddometer:
    465
    Location:
    Cloggyland
    You forgot to mention that I said that he's not only got a huge frame, but has the big heart to go with it and it's probably completely fabricated of candy :raabia

    Thanks for the compliment on my age, but I must admit it was an odd 40 years back :wink:
    You're always welcome for some more singing whilst devouring a soft drink mate :kumbaya
  13. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,910
    Location:
    :o)
    Beer is now considered as a soft drink? :lol3
  14. Tony P

    Tony P Doddery Old Fart

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2008
    Oddometer:
    205
    Location:
    Moscow, Russia.
    Another point -

    The Norwegians 'brush' with Mafia.

    Russian folk are naturally curious and enquiring. Something that 'wary' foreigners may find disconcerting at first.

    In small towns across Russia there are always young local 'Jack the Lads' wanting to appear cool. This includes acting sinister and influential for the benefit of everyone. Being seen talking with foreigners adds to their 'street cred'.

    Generally, apart from questions of where are we come from/going and why, a common question is what did the moto cost. Knowing we come from a vastly different economic environment I always avoid a direct answer with "When new about the same as a small Lada - but my moto is not new".
    About correct, and an achievably modest level for their comprehension. It always satisfied the question and I did not give an unpalatable reply that could produce envy and avarice.
  15. Mehaniotis

    Mehaniotis Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    118
    Location:
    Aurora ,Indiana
    The plot thickens.....:eek1
  16. MTrider16

    MTrider16 Ridin' in MT

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,811
    Location:
    Eastern Montana
    This is a very nice response to that age old question. :clap

    David
  17. beat

    beat Double Dutchie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Oddometer:
    88
    Location:
    appel town, the lowlands
    David, do you really care? or would you still consider buying a KTM?
  18. buzzlightyear

    buzzlightyear Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2006
    Oddometer:
    39
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Can we please quit the crap talking about LWR and focus on Sibirsky :evil
  19. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    Oddometer:
    4,016
    Location:
    Schmocation
    Well I woke up the next morning and spoke to Terry. He was OK with the guys coming along.

    Geir had spoken with his boys, and while they were a bit worried about the speed, they were prepared to start a couple of hours earlier in the morning if they had to. It looked like we had ourselves a new posse.

    Way back on Page 8, when I had introduced the initial three riders, Terry, Rick and myself, I also offered this pic ... of riders still to come into the story...

    [​IMG]

    Well you know Prutser, Beamster and Rod pretty well by now ... so I guess I better introduce the three Norwegians, who were now part of the team.

    First up ... Geir ... aka EtronX. A mountain of a man, Geir is the guy behind the Norwegian project. As mentioned earlier, I had been in contact with him for about 12 months prior to our meeting here in Irkutsk. A helicopter rescue pilot by trade, like most Norwegians is into life threatening thrill seeking kinda hobbies. He used to ride a 1200 GSA, but wisely chose a much lighter bike specially for this project - an X-Challenge. His bike was kitted out very similarly to mine, except its black, has a TT bashplate instead of my Scheffelmeier product and he had OEM forks, that had been given new springs and a change of oil by the good folks at Hyperpro. Adventure-Spec were out of stock of the Magadan panniers when he departed so he had to make do with a crazy assortment of bags on the back.

    [​IMG]

    Second up was Geirs close friend and Riding buddy Erik. Erik is a daredevil skydiving instructor. Erik's bike was the same as Geir's except his had a high fender, while Geir had a low fender. Both guys had the luxury of some pre project training with Pal Anders Ullevalseter, Scandinavia's top Dakar rider.

    [​IMG]

    Here are the boys together in previews from some pics to come:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And last but definitely not least ... the guy who in my book is up there with Beamster as probably the most remarkable of all the riders we rode with this year ... Steve. As EtronX mentioned earlier, he and Erik met a third Norwegian guy, Steve, riding around the world on an F800GS, just a few days before arriving in Irkutsk. In April 2012, Steve quit his job as an advertising exec in Norway, quit his girlfriend, and decided he wanted to ride a motorcycle around the world. Steve had never ridden a bike before. He bought an F800GS and set of into the former USSR, exploring Iran and the assorted Stans before he bumped into the Trans Sibir Expedition guys in the form of Geir and Erik, in Krasnoyarsk, just 1100 km before Irkutsk. This wasnt what he planned for. Like most long distance adventure rides on heavy bikes, Steve was just envisaging bad asphalt roads and the occasional graded gravel road. But just 3 months after he learned to ride a motorcycle, here was Steve, (aka stemic01 on this forum) being thrown into the deep end - and he was being asked if he wants to come along and do the BAM and ROB with Terry and myself. I cant speak for Steve, but I would have been petrified if that was me. :deal

    [​IMG]

    Steve was riding a pretty stock F800 ... with crash bars. :eek1 :eek1 :eek1 Not ideal for the job, but then if I hadnt thought it could get the job done I would have told Steve not to bother. I had a hunch that Steve would make it and get his bike through kicking and screaming.

    [​IMG]
  20. EtronX

    EtronX Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    214
    Location:
    Norway
    Easy now sailor boys :D

    Lets make a new thread where we can discuss C&E, orange machines and heavy german panzervagens. In this thread, if you don't mind, we will continue our little trip...