Sibirsky Extreme 2012 - The Toughest Ride of Them All

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Colebatch, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. Salsa

    Salsa Been here awhile

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  2. pdegroote

    pdegroote Adventurer

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  3. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    Thanks guys, especially big thanks to pdegroote .... he is truly de grootste in my book, as he cleaned up my site and got it back on line . :deal:deal:deal

    www.sibirskyextreme.com is back and working .... :1drink:1drink:1drink:clap:clap:clap

    You gotta love the team spirit at ADVrider !!!
  4. pdegroote

    pdegroote Adventurer

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    Walter,

    Glad I could sort it out. I wasn't too sure in the beginning. It turned out to be only a minor hack. Nothing was missing or damaged. So the effort was limited. :D

    Anyway, there was egocentric interest on behalf of myself, as I find the info on the site helpful for any future plans I may have. :evil

    regards

    Patrick
  5. elron

    elron Still Standing

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    Props to pdegroote :thumb :rayof :happay
  6. Blackveg

    Blackveg Nunc est Bibendum

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    Thanks pdegroote! :clap

    It sure looks different than the last time I could check the site out. Has Walter been working feverishly since the restoration? :happay The site looks great! Can't wait to see all the updates from this trip, untill then definitely enjoying those of the past. :wings
  7. buzzlightyear

    buzzlightyear Adventurer

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    Wordpress hacks are often due to vulnerabilaties in timthumb extension, it is used by a few themes. Best check your themes for this extension and get it onto the latest version. Also, remove the group writable attribute from the files if the apache user is different to the file owner, could prevent them adding header bits to the php files.
  8. pdegroote

    pdegroote Adventurer

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    It's a shared environment so the possibilities of controlling access are reduced. (no shell access). But as I've seen it, files are only RW for owner and R for group... so that should be ok... I haven't noticed a timthumb plugin, so I guess it was another vulnerability that got exploited. It should be relatively safe right now as I've upgraded to the latest and greates version of Wordpress.

    regards
  9. buzzlightyear

    buzzlightyear Adventurer

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    Cool. The timthumb.php does not show up as a plugin on its own, but is found in the plugins or extensions folders of themes.
  10. pdegroote

    pdegroote Adventurer

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    No files found... so should be ok. Thanks for the advice but let's not hijack the thread any longer...

    Regards

    Patrick
  11. rryd

    rryd Adventurer

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    Centerstand.
    I read, somewhere, a Suzuki V-strom test.
    They gave it a minus because it hadn't a centerstand, because "all real adventure bikes should have a centerstand"

    I'll guess it's easier to fix a flat with a centerstand but...
    What do you "hardcore" guys think about it?

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk 2
  12. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    In my view it's inappropriate on an adventure bike that does what this trip was designed to do.

    They are very heavy (often 4kgs / 9-10 lbs) and you can easily duplicate the functionality with rocks, logs or one of these. http://www.endurostar.com/. If its easier with a centrestand, then its easier by saving you 2 minutes. Saving 2 minutes once or twice on a 3 month trip is not worth carrying 0.1 kg, let alone 4 kgs.

    Further, they are spring loaded, and on heavy duty / high speed off road can spring down and end up clanking the whole day.

    The only bike in our planned group that had a centre stand was Prutser on his heavy boxer, but even then he had planned to take it off, but didnt get enough time to put together an alternate system.

    If you are talking about paved road adventure riding, then sure they are fine. If you are talking about a V Strom with its 19 inch cast front wheel etc, then you are not talking about this kind of trip anyway ... you are talking about an asphalt based adventure. If you are on asphalt, then certainly a centre stand is a useful part of your adventure bike. But if you are talking about more hard core off road adventuring, then I recommend you go without a centre stand.

    It depends totally on the type of trip you have in mind. Everything to do with adventure bike prep is the same. There is no right answer, just more appropriate solutions for the type of trip you individually plan to make. Ask yourself the questions

    (1) exactly what kind of trip do you plan to make?
    (2) how much is paved road, how much is gravel road, how much is tracks?
    (3) how important is the bike? Is the bike just a 2 wheeled transport for doing the trip on, or is the trip about riding the bike off road and getting as much pleasure out of tat as possible?
    (4) once you know all that, ask yourself how logical you want to be? Some people (like Prutser) will take a boxer on every trip, simply because he loves those bikes - he accepts that its not logical and other bikes with other set ups may do his kind of riding much easier and or faster. But he make a conscious choice to ride his boxers. RTWDoug is another good example. He knows what bike he wants to take and adapts it as best he can, knowing it will never really be ideal - but he does it cause he loves that particular style of bike. I would call these guys passionate bike preppers. If on the other hand you want to be a rationalist bike prepper (I like to think I am in that camp) then you do your best to choose the most logical / rational solutions for the type of riding you want to enjoy and the type of challenges you are anticipating.

    As a final comment, I would take any magazine review of adventure bikes with a grain (or tablespoon) of salt. I dont think I have ever read one that raised the real world issues of a real world adventure motorcyclist and how the bike in question relates to them.
  13. elron

    elron Still Standing

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    so very true ^
  14. rryd

    rryd Adventurer

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    Thanks for a detailed replay.

    I have already disassembled my center stand, because of clanking, then I read this test and thinking wtf?

    After 15 years as a car mechanic I never read car test anymore, cause most people in car magazines don't know what they are talking about when it came to what count in real life.
    It exist specialised magazines who is better, but still.. The worst is when the daily newspaper test cars, I almost quit my subscription because of that :D
    I'll guess it's about the same thing with mc magazines? Dont belive everything you read.

    This summer I will ride with EtronX to Russia on my Transalp :deal
    Normally I just ride around in Norway on paved roads so this is new for me and I look forward to it :D

    In Norway we have what we call rules of mountain intelligence (fjellvettregler) A set of rules that was made after 18 people died in the Norwegian mountain easter 1967.
    Some of the rules are: "Listen to experience people" and "Be prepared" something I think is good policy when it came to things like adventure riding also.
    I have learn a lot from the sibirsky extreme 2012 team and EtronX.
    Thanks again.
  15. CharlestonADV

    CharlestonADV I do my own stunts!

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    As always...Walter's insight is most valuable. Among the numerous lessons from the 'real deal' Sibirsky Extreme 2012 riders...their RR validated my decision to switch from aluminum panniners to soft bags.
  16. 14kmtnman

    14kmtnman Adventurer

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    I have enjoyed the whole journey & learning experience:) Here is something I just found... a cool interactive... to give different viewpoint from a train.

    http://www.google.ru/intl/ru/landing/transsib/en.html

    Moscow-Vladivostok: virtual journey on Google Maps
    The great Trans Siberian Railway, the pride of Russia, goes across two continents, 12 regions and 87 cities. The joint project of Google and the Russian Railways lets you take a trip along the famous route and see Baikal, Khekhtsirsky range, Barguzin mountains, Yenisei river and many other picturesque places of Russia without leaving your house. During the trip, you can enjoy Russian classic literature, brilliant images by photographer Anton Lange and fascinating stories about the most attractive sites on the route. Let's go!
  17. tomasv

    tomasv Check the Czech!

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    Hi Walter & Co ! Thank you very much for the interesting reading, great pictures and all of the time it took to prepare the report. It was AWESOME.

    I wanted to buy the XCountry but it has been discontinued. I was than based on your suggestion looking at TR 650 only to hear it might be the last year as well. I don't need a new bike but I would like to buy something that I can get parts for in the next 7 - 10 years as my financial situation will most likely not allow for frequent bike updates.

    I would like to make sure that if i buy used 07-09 XCountry or even 10-12 Tr650 that I will be able to get parts, service in most countries. If you don't think it's a good fit, what other bike would you recommend please.

    Thank you in advance
  18. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    You are concerned about getting parts in 10 years time cause they dont sell the bikes anymore?

    Well I think its likely that BMW will still be in business in 10 years time. Husky have effectively been bought by KTM its likely KTM will still be around in 10 years time. By law, if they are still around, they have to sell a complete range of spare parts for a minimum of 10 years after they sell the last one in many countries.

    In reality BMW are still selling spare parts for their bikes built in the 1970s and 1980s.

    Many of the parts of bikes like Husky 650 and X-Country, especially the consumables (brakes, clutches, bearings etc, are standard European components common with dozens and dozens of other bikes and are standard parts from 3-4 brands and over a dozen models of bikes).

    Your fears should stop you buying any motorcycle .. because BMW will not be selling 1200GSs in 10 years time ... does that mean you dont buy a 1200 GS? What bike can you buy now that they will still be selling the same unchanged model in 10 years time??. Very very few parts from the 1150 GS were carried over to the 1200 GS. Very few parts from the old 1200 GS are carried over to the new 1200 GS.

    If your fears were valid, then no-one would be riding older bikes ... yet the adventure bike world is still full of Honda 600 cc Transalps and Africa Twins from the late 80s and 90s, Yamaha Tenere's from the 1980s, BMW airheads from the 1980s.

    See the following for evidence that older bikes are very common as adventure bikes:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=874907

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=862577

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=504942

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=20090590&postcount=751

    As for service, there is nothing that needs any specialist tools or diagnistics on these bikes. Any bike mechanic in Siberia or can do a full service on a X-Country or Husky 650.

    Honestly, I think its a non-issue. Tomas I wouldnt worry about that.
  19. achesley

    achesley Old Motorcyclist

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    Walter,
    You and Terri really put a lot of wear and tear on your bikes this last summer. I'm sure the both of you are having to do quite a rebuild to get things back in shape. I'm fairly sure it's cheaper to rebuild what you have created than to buy new and start with modifications. How is it project coming along as Summer is not too far away now.
  20. Taranis

    Taranis Been here awhile

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    yz250

    :d