Sibirsky Extreme 2012 - The Toughest Ride of Them All

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by Colebatch, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. Cut Loose

    Cut Loose n00b

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    Awesome shots and very inspirational - keen to find out more and do something similiar one day Cheers guys
  2. JustBob

    JustBob Uh...who me?

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    Too bad we can't pre-order. I want this one.
  3. 00-SEB-00

    00-SEB-00 Been here awhile

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    Recognized a few spots... ;-)
  4. RokLobster

    RokLobster Far from sanity

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    Awesome! I read your book and have the last Sibirsky Extreme DVD (Christmas presents - by the way, awesome Christmas presents!) and cannot wait for this DVD!!! Are you going to do another book?

    I loved the first book - couldn't put it down and was left wanting more when it was done. Any chance for another book???? :clap:clap
  5. Mark.F

    Mark.F Been here awhile

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    Excellent RR. You should be sponsored by tourist boards in various former soviet states!
    I only discovered this RR a couple of weeks ago but having read your account of the BAM road the other year,buying the DVD & watching the show at the Ripley HUBB gathering I knew this would be worth reading.Excellent narrative & photography, plus good advice on what you upgraded & why.
    Thanks for taking us along!
    The new DVD is on the shopping list
    You've packed a lot into the trailer, I'll show it to a few of my mates:thumb
  6. ROD CURRIE

    ROD CURRIE Been here awhile

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    Blimey.
    I was there for quite a bit of this trip and even I'm pumped!

    Makes me realise what was great about the trip, what wasn't quite so great (endless wet feet) and frankly how even at my age how it enhanced my life, how much I miss it, and how much unfinished business I still have over there.

    I see an Eastbound trip coming on next year.

    For all you guys who see yourselves as Laptop adv-ers, or guys who think they'll never be able to do it but will always watch it through the eyes of another:

    This is SO accessible and just needs a change from "I'll do that, one day"...to "I'll do that". How easy is that?

    Confucious said " A journey of a thousand leagues starts with but a single step".
    I'ts a small mindset shift and once you've made that change and take the first step-It may be as simple as applying for a visa, or even just booking a ferry - you've committed and you're on your way to what will ABSOLUTELY be the adventure of your life.

    You don't need to start with a SibEx style expedition.
    Europeans go to Pyrenees, the Carpathians, pretty much anywhere a day or two's ride away.
    Americans have endless choice within a day or so.


    1)IT'S NOT DANGEROUS-ignore all these "adventure" films with some drongo bleating on about how scared he is. Just prep and plan SENSIBLY (not paranoically) and it WILL be fine.
    2) IT'S relatively inexpensive-pro-rata much cheaper than any family holiday - even dragging a fucking caravan -so is well within just about anyone's budget.
    3) Most importantly and I will brook no argument on this : It will definitely change you forever; make you stronger, more tolerant of others views, less trusting of Politicians (hard to believe I know:wink:) and government, you'll know yourself better and find depths of resilience you never knew you had.

    Next year you'll be posting and we'll be dribbling.

    Well? What are you waiting for? ...take that first step and it'll happen. :freaky
  7. huguesfrederic

    huguesfrederic HF

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    First and foremost congratulation.

    Now the tough question: what was in is bags? I understand, no camera, no charger and no computer, but just the tent, sleeping bag, mattress and tools take a huge amount of space. I really want to know, because I tried to pack small, and always end up with a big pilon bag :(

    Please help
  8. ROD CURRIE

    ROD CURRIE Been here awhile

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    Hi Frederic.
    Everyone takes too many clothes at first.

    In addition to your bike gear-that's after all what you'll be wearing day in-day out.

    All you need is
    1 pr zipleg trousers that will make shorts
    4 pr socks
    4 Jocks
    4 T shirt
    1 thin but quality fleece
    Sandals or non-bike shoes
    SMALL towel

    I will ALL easily go in a small supermarket-style plastic bag.
    Toiletries I just carry shower gel, toothpaste and antiperspirant. I don't think Girls need much more but I'm sure Tiff or another girl will chime in to help anyone with wifey or girlfriend on their trip. Suggest straighteners and a hairdryer are out but WTFDIK?

    Get lightweight i.e backpacking tent and always look for smaller-lighter. You get better at it and I'm carrying less now than ever. You'll get to a point that's right for you.
  9. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    well with the Magadan bags, I put camping gear - tent, mattress, sleeping bag and eating utensils - in one bag

    The other bag has spares, tubes, clothes, big bulky video gear that I didnt use.

    Small rear bag has laptop and electronic equipment, bathroom bag, one or two changes of clothes ... i.e at the end of the day all i needed to remove was the rear bag.

    Next time, I will not take the big bulky video camera gear and will try and do it just with the two side bags, and a very small rear bag. The laptop and sensitive electronics is still best in a rear bag. The most protected spot on the bike.
  10. live2ridetahoe

    live2ridetahoe RN

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    Walter,

    Did you have a small tank bag as well? What kind of rear bag are you talking about?

    Jeff G.
  11. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    My rear bag is an ortlieb 49 litre (L) sized rack pack. See in this pic

    [​IMG]

    They come in 4 sizes ... the XL (89 litres) is by far the most common on motorcycles. I used to use one, but realised its way too much weight up too high and too far back. Better to have bigger side bags (where the weight it lower and further forward) and as small as possible bag on the back

    Mine in the pic is the L (49 litres)

    I will in future use an M (31 litres)

    See also: http://www.ortlieb.com/_prod.php?lang=en&produkt=rackpack

    Touratech try to rebrand them and sell them too, but they are really ortlieb bags.
  12. CharlestonADV

    CharlestonADV I do my own stunts!

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    I used a Large Ortlieb as a tailbag on a northwestern USA trip this summer with soft Happy Trails mojave panniers. Liked this system much better than the aluminum hard cases used previously.
  13. huguesfrederic

    huguesfrederic HF

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    Thank you,

    I will try it, mind you on the last trip I had only 3 changes... The big challenge was that I had to deal with temperature variation from 30 to minus 5 and sun to snow. It was hard to find the right gear.

    Thanks all for your recommendations I will keep tring stuff and get better at it.

    First thing will be to get the Badlands and get rid of my bulky raincoat and pants, almost 1/3 of one of one of my bags. :huh
  14. tmotten

    tmotten Lefthand ride Dutchy

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    :clap:clap:clap:clap:clap

    Great posts.

    Once you change the mindset of "that little bit won't matter" to "every bit counts" you're there. What you spend going light you'll save in big panniers, racks and crash bars.

    Couple of additions to the above. Puff jackets are lighter, warmer and pack smaller. It's not all about weight. Bikes are dynamic so volume is just as important.

    Instead of tents think about shelters (single wall tents) which are half the size and weight. If you can deal with not having running water, you can deal with a bit of condensation. Super absorbent fabrics can be used to mob some up if it is really humid. But if you have a high mat like the exped type (heavy BTW) it's not that big of a problem if a problem at all.

    Cut that fabric as small as you like to turn it into your travel towel. The really good fabrics allow you to wash it whilst you are having a shower and use it right after. In the morning I use the pillow cover of the hotel.

    The best test I find is if you pack all your gear minus bike stuff and are happy when you go hiking for a weekend, you're almost there. It could/should be lighter and smaller. :wink:

    My wife's toiletry case is bigger than her packed clothes, but those are half the size than mime. So she's still ahead. Don't bother arguing about the need for conditioner and moisturizer. Not worth your time and you'll enjoy the long silky hair and smooth skin. :deal:evil
  15. tmotten

    tmotten Lefthand ride Dutchy

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    Could have done with that photo a few months back.
  16. kolja

    kolja n00b

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    perhaps i might add to rods post:

    Just returned from an Iran-Trip. Way lessssss offroad than you had. Much to heavy bikes and luggage anyway. Nevertheless - the less you carry, the more fun you have.

    My - subjective - conclusion for myself so far:

    Beside the clothes i'm wearing:
    2 quickdrying T-Shirts (even one would be ok)
    1-2 boxershorts (how do you call undertrousers?)
    1-2 pair of socks
    1 fleece-pullover
    1 pair of sandals
    1 lightweight, quickdrying cargotrouser (to change once you leave the motorcycle, zip-legged, pockets big enough to carry your papers, money, small camera)
    1 small, quick drying towel
    1 lightweight string (to dry your clothes)

    add 1 PIECE (hard) of soap and you can wash all - the gear and yourself - once you hit a shower, water or whatever.

    from hygienic point of view, what really more do you need than:
    1 piece of soap (works for every kind of washing - can buy it everywhere)
    1 deo
    1 toothbrush + toothpaste
    (shaver)

    add the odd creme that cures wounds, perhaps something that heals deeper, something against headache, inflammation?, ... and some more minimal bits and pieces and off you go.

    beside motorcycle-wear i'd always carry lightweight rain-jacket and -trouser as it not only protects you from rain, but delivers an additional insulation if it get's cold. (all inner layers of my motorcycle-wear stay at home - unnecessary hassle, you'll never zip your waterproof inner layer in when it starts to rain - first fully undressing on the road and than redressing)

    if you always sleep in houses/huts, leave a tent at home. unnecessary weight. insulation matress, sleepingbag alone are enough to sleep outside - add something against midgies.

    if you plan to camp from time to time,
    1 lightweight, self-standing, 1-person-tent with enough apsis to put your gear under a roofy type of thing - msr hubba hp i can recommend (1.4kg incl. footprint), wechsel pathfinder zg (heavier - 1.9kg, much smaller apsis, no height for sitting, more storm-stable)
    1 lightweight insulation matress (small, thermarest, exped, ...)
    1 lightweight down sleeping bag (around zero - 500g - mostly enough, combine it with a second layer, your clothes to get it going for deeper temperatures - i'm using ajungilak sphere spring, but would go for a polish cumulus in the future)

    always leave home - or throw away ;) - what you don't REALLY need and what mostly doesn't solve at least two problems at once. less weight, less trouble, more fun. (take care, that your whatever-luggage leaves a bit space inside and is not filled to the max - accelerates packing and unpacking a lot - saves stress). plan your luggage in a way, that you can leave it all at the motorcycle at night. have a small bag, you can quickly get out with everything inside for the night you need, leave the rest of the mess packed at the bike and off you go. refitting the little bag has to be similarly fast. take it, go, put it in, ready. no matter if hard or soft luggage.

    perhaps that might add to someones ideas...

    ps: i can really recommend the new nolan n44 helmet. my preferred setup: transparent thingy - visor? - off, sun-"umbrella" on, front-thingy on (in front of your chin?). nothing disturbs your view. if it starts raining stronger, you have the option to put the transparent shield back in front of your face (my friends always had it attached - i preferred the air and had it off). one friend even smoked while driving - he had the front-thingy always off so driving a jet-helmet.
  17. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    I missed it earlier
  18. just jeff

    just jeff Long timer

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    Hi Colbatch!
    I was reading an article you wrote about weight of bikes and how important it is to be as light as possible. You also mentioned the new bike you are building. Can you direct me to that article? For the life of me I can't find it again!
    Also...I bought a set of the Magadan soft bags and love them! I ordered them direct from AdventureSpec in GB and was/am amazed that they arrived in 3 days to my shop in Northern Alberta, Canada. Did you use the supplied drybag liners when you were on the trails? The bags seem pretty waterproof as is.
    Regards....just jeff

    Just found it of course! The link is in post 4715 by stemic01.
  19. FlyingPenguin

    FlyingPenguin Been here awhile

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    Jeff, I've used a set of Magadans all summer and right now I'm working my way up the COBDR to the KTM Rally. My experience is the outside material is very water resistant however dust works through the closure and settles atop the dry bag. And the outter bag is not water proof if submerged .....
  20. Colebatch

    Colebatch "Moto Porn"ographer

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    I post commentaries like that on my webpage www.sibirskyextreme.com ... and link to them on the sibirsky facebook page (in my sig line).

    It was the first in a series of articles on bike selection. I will put another up later this week.

    As far as a new bike build goes, it should be something for the coming winter months :)

    PS.. yes adventure spec ship fast to north america. Its as quick as having it shipped within north america these days, thanks to the amount of transatlantic air freight services.