Sleeping bag suggestion.

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Emanuele, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. Emanuele

    Emanuele Adventurer

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    Hi all,

    could you guys suggest a great sleeping bag for spring/summer/fall in 40/50F weather, to keep in the BMW cases?

    thank you!

    Emanuele
    #1
  2. Patch

    Patch Been here awhile

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    You're gonna get a ton of responses... most of which will tell you to use the search function :evil

    My opinion is the EMS Velocity 35 http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=4420541
    ...under 2 pounds, synthetic, packs to the size of a nalgene. I've been really happy with mine!
    #2
  3. Afry

    Afry Why hike?

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    Big Agnes Buffalo has what no one else does. A sleeve that the pad or air mat slides into so you never roll off. Its a wide comfortable bag made for 40 degrees that packs smaller than many mummys cause it uses the pad as the bottom insulator.

    I just slept warm at temps below 30 in it at Warped.
    #3
  4. Jim Colombotos

    Jim Colombotos Been here awhile

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    the down works
    santa cruz ca
    #4
  5. mike54

    mike54 You don't get me

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    If you're going to keep it in your cases then don't get a down one. They need to be stored uncompressed. Same is true for synthetic really but they don't suffer from prolonged compression as badly as the down ones do.
    #5
  6. FatChance

    FatChance Road Captain

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    Hopefully Emanuele meant the bag would just be put in the cases from camp to camp each day and not stored in the cases long term...


    To the OP: I just got a Kelty Light Year 20 degree down bag at the REI outlet store. Normally $200 (for the men's long), overstock price $133, with their recent 20% off sale and a $29 dividend I had there, mine was delivered for $86. It came with storage and compression bags, has a zipped storage pocket and four outside loops to attach two lengths of parachute cord to hold it on an air mattress just as effectively as the system on the Big Agnes bags. Even without the discounts I got it is a great deal on a very good bag that would work well for your specifications. REFERENCE.
    #6
  7. Namecheck

    Namecheck Like a Sir!

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    Check out golite.com I have an adrenaline which is a four season bag, but they make the best lightest stuff around. If you want something REALLY small check out Snugpak sleep systems. I got one in 2005 and it's the size of a cantaloupe when compressed.

    I've been preparing to be a guide for a few years now and people in here have alot of good comments:

    1. Down bags do need to be hung so then don't lose loft, but they remain king in warmth
    2. That big agnes bag is really innovative for sure

    Remember when buying a sleeping bag that the temperature standard (at least in the US) starts from the zipper up - it is an old throwback which assumes the use of a ground cloth and insulative type pad.
    #7
  8. ssevy

    ssevy Been here awhile

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    Wiggys.
    #8
  9. fbj913

    fbj913 On the Beemer Kool-Aid

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    Any Big Agnes with Big Agnes sleeping pad.
    #9
  10. perterra

    perterra -. --- .--. .

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  11. AlanCT

    AlanCT The Byronic Man

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  12. frogy

    frogy Been here awhile

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    +1,they really do control moisture...cause man I sweat.
    #12
  13. perterra

    perterra -. --- .--. .

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    Just call Wiggys and ask a pointed question. :lol3 He's a jerk.
    #13
  14. akrider

    akrider mild adventurer

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    I'm a happy Alaskan, Summer and Winter in my Wiggy Bags. Also us his boot liners in place of felt pacs in my boots.
    When it comes to outdoor gear I only speak up for what I find works best for me, and I have more than one Wiggy bag.
    #14
  15. DFWBo

    DFWBo Been here awhile

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    +1
    #15
  16. Joey Stalin

    Joey Stalin Been here awhile

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  17. ssevy

    ssevy Been here awhile

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    Fortunately, he doesn't come with the bag.:eek1 While his manner can be abrasive (to say the least), his gear has far surpassed any other insulated gear that I have owned, and I have owned a bunch. His two bag system will give you the flexibility to cover very wide temperature extremes most comfortably. When you are sitting in a freezing cold tent listening to the rain turn to sleet, you won't give a shit about his manners, as you'll be warm and dry. Forget down, when it gets wet it is useless, and when you are on a trip with a motorcycle, the smart money will always bet on at least a few days of rain.
    #17
  18. PhilzLeads

    PhilzLeads Goin' mobile

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    To the OP, when you say you want a bag that will cover a certain temp range, keep in mind that that particular temp range does not necessarily mean you will be comfortable. It means you will most likely not suffer hypothermia. Bags are rated a certain way, and most with the use of a ground pad. You should go with a bag that is rated 10-15 degrees lower than the lowest night time temps you expect to encounter. If you are a "warm sleeper", you can always open a bag that is too warm. But if you are a "cold sleeper", you may have a long night in a bag not rated for low temps.

    I have a Wiggys, but I would never carry it on the bike, its for car camping/hunting. I've slept in it at about 14F in a tent and was toasty.

    My bike sleeping bag is a Marmot Never Winter. It is rated to 30F. I also have a Sea-to-Summit Thermolite REACTOR bag. I have the extreme model. This is essentially a fabric bag that you put in your sleeping that will increase its rating to a lower temp. It packs to a size smaller than a Nalgene bottle. I just used this setup tent camping in N. PA. When I awoke, my water bottle left out all night was just slushing out of the bottle, I was comfy with this setup.

    Other factors are, I bring along a sleeping hat. Knit cap type of thing. The Marmot Never Winter is a down mummy bag

    Here's a guide to the EN rating and Marmot's: http://marmot.com/product/content/en-tested.
    #18
  19. perterra

    perterra -. --- .--. .

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    I've heard it is good quality, after the phone call I pretty much just bought a kelty and let it go at that. Could be smaller but I hate tight bags.
    #19
  20. mookybird

    mookybird Gramps

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    Just my opinion based on my own experiences whether you choose down or synthetic be sure to take girth "how big around at the chest and foot" as well as length into account, the best bag in the world blows if it's too snug or short.

    The difference between high and low priced bags is how much they weigh and how small they compress, if you have room for a fairly large stuff sack "watermelon size or so" there isn't any reason to go buy a Western Mountaineering bag, I have two of them and use them a bunch but my favorite bags are the heavier bulkier bags that I've used for well over twenty years and cost about 1/3 the cost of my WM bags.

    There are no magic sleeping bags, if it weighs 9 ounces and packs the size of a grapefruit it either cost about $400 or your going to freeze in it unless your in a really warm place.

    For most of my excursions space always seems very limited and a synthetic bag isn't an option, I like them when I'm car camping or in the wall tent but comparing bags of equal warmth the down bag will be the more compact package.

    As to down vs synthetic when wet? I agree a wet down bag is useless but then a wet synthetic bag probably wouldn't be as comfortable as a dry one so just keep your bag dry. I've used down bags for years worth of multiday creekboating trips, we managed to camp in snow and spend days running rapids and waterfalls with the bag jammed in the nose of an 8 foot kayak and kept the bags dry so it has to be manageable in a pannier.

    Western Mountaineerings website lists the specs of their bags, measurements and weights and they have an enviable reputation for accuracy in temp ratings. I'm not suggesting you buy one as they are expensive and overkill for hauling around on a motorbike but you can use their specs to compare other bags with keeping in mind most companies bags fall far short of the specified weight and warmth rating listed.

    Based on the responses you've probably gathered that opinions on Wiggy's runs a little strong, if your set on synthetic and don't mind spending a pile of money you might google Kifaru and see what they are offering these days as well. Enjoy Denny
    #20