Slip-n-slide

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by Culveres, Sep 13, 2016.

  1. Culveres

    Culveres Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2015
    Oddometer:
    24
    Location:
    Maryville, TN
    Rode 250 miles in east Tennessee sun and wind with a group. 2 miles from home, seeing storm clouds but still dry streets, I turned onto a 25 mph side street to go to my subdivision. Saw wet shoulders, then wet pavement ahead. I made a 20 mph lane position adjustment on the wet street and bike just jettisoned out from under me. I ride a Suzuki Burgman 650. I've put over 25 k miles on this bike in 5 years. This is my first moving drop. The bike slid away faster than me and we both stopped before arriving at the curb ahead. An oncoming car stopped and he helped me pick the bike up. I was wearing helmet, gloves, boots, heavy jeans with Kevlar knee and hip pads. I did not put my riding jacket on after lunch so only had long sleeve nylon shirt.
    The tupperware foot pan, muffler, and folding turn signal assembly took the brunt of the damage to the bike. And that was minimal. That tupperware is tough stuff. I had scuffs on boots, gloves and jeans; no tears. Shirt had a tear at sleeve cuff. I got a small scrape on baby finger, small rash near elbow and small scrape near elbow. Right foot was sore. I think the bike crushed the foot laterally. Some swelling and a lot of bruising behind toes. All healed now.

    I always wear the jacket. In this group no one else wore jackets.
    I can't say this was a problem on this incident; just slid to a gentle stop on slippery wet asphalt.

    I can say that the predominant factor in the minimal damage in this incident was LUCK or fate or somesuch. The cause was freshly wetted roadway and too much torque and turn and lean for the road condition. Not much, mind you, just too much!

    The road surface was almost new, very smooth, and with fine agregate. Did I say slippery?

    I've studied uncertainty, I've calculated it, and I'm usually surprised by how much there is out there. It seems we tend to rely so much on what we think we know about things, and not enough on what we don't know or can't quantify. My Dad was an experienced engineer and he used to say "I don't understand all I know about [insert topic]". This didn't keep him from analyzing what he knew and making a decision then moving forward. It was sort of like paying homage to the relevant uncertainty and factoring some safety factor in to cover some unknown portion of it. So we all do this to some degree in every day life.

    Figuring in adequate safety factor to cover unknown quantities of uncertainty (some is merely unknown quantity, other is significantly simply unknown) when we are riding usually means turning up awareness of conditions and uncertainty, and turning down bike speed.

    So, the big YET happened to me. I was irresponsibly lucky. YET can always happen again and probably will. I am certain of that!

    Slow down and enjoy riding safely.

    Sent from my SM-T320 using Tapatalk
    #1
    LostInPA and Ohthetrees like this.
  2. LostInPA

    LostInPA Professional American

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,068
    Location:
    Central PA
    The main factor in all my crashes, was me going too fast. All off-road, but that's what it boils down to. Too fast for the conditions I entered into, splat. I ride very conservative on the street but on dirt I go full retard. Which we all know one should never do.

    In order to develop a sense of speed for off-road, and what's too fast for a noob, a guy advised me to take my current speed and double it in my mind and see if it seemed like a good idea. Point being to force myself to take it easy.

    Glad you got out relatively unscathed. :-)
    #2
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  3. BMWDavid

    BMWDavid Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    177
    Location:
    Southwest Indiana
    Reminds me of my first get off way back in 1974. Three of us out on a nice two lane county road and I'm riding my brand new '73 Yamaha TX500. I'm number 2. Me and the first guy are relatively experienced even though we are only 20 years old. I've been riding four years and had some dirt bike riding under my belt. Anyway...the third guy is a newby. Well, car in front stops quickly to make a left turn. Me and the first guy make a controlled quick stop with plenty of room in front of the car.

    All I hear is sreeeech then bam! Right in the rear I get hit. Flung off bike and rolled down the embankment. I'm OK, a little bruised. Even back then (1973 and at 20 years of age) I wore a helmet, jacket and gloves. Bike is beat up but we bend some levers, fenders and it's ridable. The guy manages to stay upright after punting me.

    No cell phones and since we're all OK. So no cops are called and we ride home. Guy is nice enough to pay all of repairs needed on my bike.

    Ever since that I always put the new guy in the lead. Better to let him hit what ever we need to avoid rather than us experienced riders.
    #3
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  4. GETTHUMPER2

    GETTHUMPER2 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2013
    Oddometer:
    513
    Location:
    SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
    :wave Hi David,,,, PLUS 1, when I used to train rookie M/C couriers their first week or two would be "probationary" and I would always put them in front. Many would say "so you want to see what I can do huh?" and my response would be something like "No, not what you CAN do, but what you WILL do".
    THUMPER>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    #4
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  5. mudmonster

    mudmonster Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Oddometer:
    546
    Location:
    Sydney , Australia
    Most of us have had crashes and survived ,the main thing is to learn from it and not get in that situation again !
    #5
  6. shovelstrokeed

    shovelstrokeed Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,148
    Location:
    South Florida
    How many miles on the tires and what brand were they?
    #6
  7. Culveres

    Culveres Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2015
    Oddometer:
    24
    Location:
    Maryville, TN
    Shinko 567 front and 568 rear. About 1k miles.

    Sent from my SM-T320 using Tapatalk
    #7
  8. WVhillbilly

    WVhillbilly Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2010
    Oddometer:
    25,341
    Location:
    WV
    :fpalm

    I know everyone says those are the most awesome tires ever, because they are cheap.
    But I've also seen quite a few instances of that brand of tires giving up on wet pavement.

    Someone will be along to tell me how wrong I am in a minute.
    Did you go back and see if there was anything (fuel, oil) on the road.
    #8