Slow-ish lowside into rail

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by metale, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. metale

    metale Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
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    84
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    Portugal
    The road where this happened is used by many trucks on work-days. Could have been diesel on the road, or oil, orr resin, or just my lack of experience.

    I had a car crash 11 years ago which involved tree resin. But looking back to that one, I had time to react, even though I was a new driver at the time. With this one, as soon as I knew something was wrong, I was already on the ground, it was really fast.
    #21
  2. Fajita Dave

    Fajita Dave Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    717
    Location:
    Barboursville, VA
    On corner entry there isn't much you can do to lose the rear end so suddenly unless you were adding throttle + lean angle (which you weren't) or using the rear brake to heavily (which you weren't doing either).

    The seating position on your CBR doesn't give you enough space to move forward so far that it would unload the rear tire (unlike what you could do on a flat track bike). Unless you somehow got your head so far forward it was over the wind screen. And you said you were slightly on throttle to hold your speed steady so the front wasn't all that heavily loaded if you had at least some throttle applied.

    Since you said you were riding at a pretty fast pace you were probably looking pretty far ahead. So it was probably something on the road that you didn't see.

    Tires could have played a part in it, especially if that was the lowest you've ever gotten the bike leaned. The smooth surface of fresh rubber is slick until it gets scuffed in especially when cold. Cold weather will always reduce grip but a street tire should still have quite a bit of grip. Lowering tire pressure wouldn't do anything, you might get an extra 5 degrees F in the tire which wouldn't have much of an effect at all on the street. I ride in below freezing temps on my gsxr-600 with track day tires (Dunlop 211GP at 36psi) and have gotten to some very low lean angles without slipping.

    I would take a VERY detailed look at your rear suspension for any sort of play in the bearings and that the rear shock is operating smoothly.
    #22
  3. metale

    metale Adventurer

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    Correct on all accounts.

    I was stable on the throttle as to avoid engine braking (which is strong on this bike, unlike the 13hp engine :) )

    Is there such thing as too much counter-steering? I'm thinking if I could have upset the rear through it, like some micro-correction I may have unintentionally done?

    Because apart from body placement, countersteer was the only input I was giving the CBR.
    #23
  4. Fajita Dave

    Fajita Dave Been here awhile

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    May 13, 2007
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    Barboursville, VA
    You can counter-steer to quickly but only if the surface conditions are poor or when the tires are cold. It still makes the front end let go however, not the rear.
    #24
  5. RaystheBMW

    RaystheBMW 1986 R65

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    Jun 29, 2012
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    Maryland USA
    It seems a lot of these posted mishaps involve sweeping left hand turns on smooth roads. Maybe there's a natural tendency during the weight shift and extra g-force to push your left foot down and causing an unintended downshift? Just a thought.
    #25
  6. metale

    metale Adventurer

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    I don't think that was the case, because I have a bad riding tecnique: I ride with the ball of my feet on the footpegs, instead of the center/heel of my feet. This means I have to move my feet forward on the footpegs to shift or (rear-)brake.

    I also haven't felt anything upsetting the drivetrain or any difference in engine rpm/sound before the fall.
    #26