SMALL bike camping thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by RAZR, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. tshelver

    tshelver Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    568
    Location:
    Beween here (SE Asia) and there (NH/VT)
    I was camping off my Husky TE610E, equipped with a rear rack and bag protectors.
    Used a 50L Ortlieb dry bag to carry tent and allied equipment, stove and sleeping bag and associated stuff went in one Ortlieb saddlebag (the old 25 liter throwovers) and clothes and so on in the other.
    WOflman dual sport tankbag for tools and heavier items.

    That whole setup (excluding the racks, I am still working on that) is being moved to a Yamaha YBR125G, a 'dual sport' model made in China and imported into the Philippines and several other countries.

    While that seems crazy, the bike has a higher carrying capacity than the Husky, and the saddle is actually bigger (wider and longer). A 3.2 gallon tank takes me over 240 miles if I am pushing it.

    Bike is quite competent at trail crawling: low weight and low saddle height and narrow width let you go places that will give a rider on a 'real' adventure bike fits.

    For a stove, it is hard to beat the Trangia system: http://www.trangia.se/english/5615.27_series_ul_ha.html. Alcohol, so you can get fuel around the world. Mine is a 30 year old knockoff, comes with an extremely efficient windshield / base / pot holder that makes up for the lower efficiency of alcohol. I've used it at 10,000 feet in sub zero temperatures without too many issues.
    No need for plates as the Trangia comes with two pots and a fry pan, base / stove holder and windshield in one compact package.
    No moving parts, no wearing parts, really robust, simple and easy to use. Very stable in all conditions.

    For a tent, I've switched to a Nemo 3P. The extra space (50 square feet) costs only a pound in weight over the 2P. Great for tropical climes as well, with doors and mesh on 2 sides for optimal flow, and I don't get claustrophobia if I have to spend a few days in one spot.
  2. FMFDOC

    FMFDOC Long timer

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    Mount Airy, (Not Mayberry, the Maryland one.)
    Bump
  3. nuggets

    nuggets Fries with that?

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,874
    Location:
    Virgina
    This is my bike fully loaded ready to camp. I will not be wearing a backpack.
    [​IMG]

    I have gotten the total gear weight down to 23.6lbs(10.7kg).

    I am packing:

    In side bags,
    Hammock
    Rainfly
    Para cord
    50ft small rope

    Alcohol stove, cookpot, stand, spoon, Heet, lighter.
    2 days food, coffee, and tea.
    1 liter water
    water purification tabs
    first aid kit
    water shoes
    Tools and repair supplies

    In dry bag
    20 degree Sleeping bag
    Change of clothes
    sweater
    long underwear

    This setup keeps me pretty comfortable.

    With this camp set up, I do not have any camping gear getting near my seating area, and do not have to wear a backpack. The bike also handles a lot better with a smaller load.
  4. UpST8

    UpST8 turnin gas to noise

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    7,342
    Location:
    californication
    Lookin good nuggets! Funny how I have acquired all this camping stuff over the years and now I find myself wanting to get smaller, smaller, lighter and lighter.

    Still keep all the big stuff for when Mamma wants to go truck camping :D
  5. nuggets

    nuggets Fries with that?

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,874
    Location:
    Virgina
    Hah! Look at you slumming over in Thumpers! :lol3

    I can help you go light.

    Funny you say truck camping, I just got a big 2 burner coleman stove.
  6. drikko

    drikko Been here awhile

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    Sep 3, 2010
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    495
    Location:
    Brisbane
    No beer/port/rum?????? :eek1:eek1:eek1:eek1:eek1:eek1
  7. nuggets

    nuggets Fries with that?

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
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    Sorry no, can usually snag a night's supply at a gas stop.

    I should have packed a bit more. That 20 degree bag was a lie. Cold at night.
  8. duanew1

    duanew1 In my Pajama pants

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2008
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    Location:
    Huntsville, AL
    A 20 degree bag will only keep you alive at 20 degrees. It will not keep you comfortable at that temperature. I am pretty sure that is the way the ratings work for sleeping bags.
  9. nuggets

    nuggets Fries with that?

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    True enough, but considering lows were mid 40's at worst, I should have been warmer. I have a 40 degree bag which has kept me warmer in similar weather.
  10. cug

    cug --

    Joined:
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    That's the way rating works for "cheaper" sleeping bags. Quality ones will normally give you a "comfort" and and "lower limit" rating where the lower rating is roughly (although not exactly, the "exact" definition is the "temperate an average man can halfway comfortably get through the night while wearing a base layer and a hat") what you refer to here.

    My 15 degree Marmot Helium (15F lower limit, 28F comfortable for women) was comfortable around 20F two years ago. But, and that's another big one: these ratings assume that you are out of the wind and have an insulating sleeping pad. So, as long as you don't put an insulation layer in that hammock, the rating won't even come close.
  11. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    BRC \ NYC
    Here's a tip, do not carry the stove, cookpot or alcohol for it in the side bags. If the bike goes down you'll crush it all and have spilled fuel all over everything. Keep the squishy stuff in the side bags.

    Of course this is if you are off roading, if you're on the street disregard.
  12. nuggets

    nuggets Fries with that?

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    This is my stove: http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=21234815&postcount=267

    It is small and tough, and the heet bottles are very tough also, so I am ok with letting them live in the side bags. I know a lot of other stoves would not do well in a crash.
  13. bymbie

    bymbie Adventurer

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    Jan 10, 2012
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    Location:
    Canadian Subarctic
    There is no mention of any kind us insulation underneath you... Hammocks are more sensitive to convective heat loss than traditional tent/tarp setups. At least you need a sleeping pad, but an under-quilt is preferred... Without that, your sleeping bag is relatively useless... No wonder you were cold.
  14. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
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    Location:
    Lost in the jungles of Thailand

    Nuggets - I use the same basic set-up as you; small pot with everything stashed inside( Stove, alcohol, utensils, lighter, rag etc). I'm not as worried as Hachayalboded about spilled alcohol as its kept in a soft plastic bottle and does not crush so seems fairly bulletproof. However as he stated your pot is at risk to getting smashed.

    [​IMG]

    The above pot was kept in the side portion of my bags and some offroad crashes later ended up with my pot in this shape. I could still make meals with it, however the lid would not seal and it did not balance on the alcohol stove easily post get off's. Everything inside the pot was fine. Needless to say the bottom of saddlebags was not the optimal place for good pot survival odds. If you can get them up top it will keep you from having to buy new pots each offroad trip. If kept in the sidebags the very top of the saddlebag is a better protected area moreso than the bottom or directly against the sides of the saddlebag/GL. Or just never crash:lol3.

    I was actually thinking some small steel pots or titanium would hold up better to offroad use than the aluminum and tin most used in these applications.
  15. nuggets

    nuggets Fries with that?

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    All fine points. My cookpot is steel, and always lives on top in the saddlebag. I can always get another one if this one gets bashed.
  16. sandalscout

    sandalscout blah blah blah

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    Nashville, TN
    Funny you mention this. On a trip this weekend, a fellow rider mentioned having a seemingly fine bottle of Heet (properly closed) leaking all of his bag when on a previous offroading trip. He couldn't find anything wrong with the bottle, and the seal looked fine, but it still leaked. I would feel much more comfortable with a MSR bottle or the like, versus a plastic bottle of Heet.
  17. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    Location:
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    I changed to a stainless steel billy a while back & it has certainly held up to a few tipovers better than the beat up old old alu one. Mind you it's usually pretty easy to beat the alu one back into shape with a rock when required.

    Cheers
    Clint
  18. tshelver

    tshelver Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    568
    Location:
    Beween here (SE Asia) and there (NH/VT)
    One thing about Heet is that some types contain a lot of additives that are not conducive to clean burning or your health.
    I much prefer the alcohol available from the hardware store: again, some types burn better than others.
    I've also experienced the leaking container thing, not all fuel bottles are created equal, so choose a good brand.

    I use it in a 25 year old knockoff Trangia system. Robust, compact and light, considering that 2 pots, fry pan, windshield, stand, potholder, lighter and stove all fit in a package the size of most pots.
    The windshield and stand are about the best I've seen on any hiking stove, and combine to give this stove it's stability and efficiency.
  19. snare

    snare sittin and breathin

    Joined:
    May 20, 2007
    Oddometer:
    406
    Location:
    In Pisgah
    My adventure bike is a Super Sherpa.

    For a base load I carry the same I carry when i ultralight backpack:

    Shelter / Sleeping

    - DIY gathered end hammock made of 30D unfinished ripstop nylon (with knotty mods), Whoopie sling, toggle and tree strap suspension.

    - single layer poncho liner under quilt (I have a 2-3 layer one for winter)

    - ozark trails cocoon 200, 32*F, down bag that i modded in to a top quilt (removed zippers and hood )

    - sil nylon tarp

    - optional.... DIY Bug Net (bottom entry 'Fronkey style' ). I actually do not need it most places and times of year here in the mountains....havent needed it yet this year at all actually)


    Cook Kit

    - DIY Fancee Feast Wick alcohol stove

    - 10cm IMUSA Mug with DIY pie tin lid as my cook pot

    - HD aluminum foil windscreen

    - Armour Vienna Bites aluminum can for coffee cup ( another good option is the Blue Diamond Almond can , which is steel, but very light. Either the Armour Vienna Bites or the BD Almond can can be used directly on the stove if need be or to reduce the weight further by eliminating the IMUSA cook pot)

    - lexan spoon

    I often just boil water to freezer bag cooking.

    My shelter/sleeping and cook kit weighs out at less than 5 lbs total. Shelter / sleeping at about 4 lbs, cook kit weighs in at 5 oz without fuel.

    __________________
  20. veriest1

    veriest1 Grand NOOBlet

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2011
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    2,724
    Location:
    Central Tejas
    Really? Are you on BPL?

    I just got a new little bike (DR350). I've missed having something I could run nastier trails on.

    I hope to test my kit out on it in the near future.

    Sent from my HTC using magic.