Small wool stove

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by AMSBIKER, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. AMSBIKER

    AMSBIKER Adventurer

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    #1
  2. ph0rk

    ph0rk Doesn't Care

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    I bet you're going to have to re-lanolin that thing every time you make a pot of coffee.
    #2
  3. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    Will you use it to cook mutton?
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  4. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    They're great for when you're on the lamb!
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  5. duck

    duck Banned

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    You're gonna get cold after you burn your socks and sweater.
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  6. enduro0125

    enduro0125 Sticks and Stones™..

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    Will steel wool work?
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  7. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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  8. Joetool

    Joetool Been here awhile

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    Are you going to be in New Zealand a lot? You may have difficulties with that stove in a lot of the U.S. Although areas of Utah in the spring and SouthWest Colorado might work. You may be able to go to thrift stores and get really cheap sweaters that may work. Be careful, I think a lot of wool items have some acrylic in them that may not burn well, or at the very least, may stink.
    Can you burn cotton in it too? or is it limited to wool?
    My neighbor has sheep, and maybe I could get you some scraps, although usually the scraps are from the 'end' and are covered with poop; Maybe it would work though, kinda like burning cow pies...:D
    #8
  9. concours

    concours WFO for 41 years

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    I love this place! ONE little typo... and the man's balls are BUSTED! :lol3 :rofl

    ANYWAY, just for some useless trivia, on a serious note, WOOL DOES NOT BURN. I remember my welding instructor in trade school telling me "a wool shirt is best to wear to resist sparks' and I remember thinking, "THAT sounds comfortable, NOT!" I've since proven it over and over. The MIRACLE fiber, insulates well when wet, won't burn! :freaky
    #9
  10. AMSBIKER

    AMSBIKER Adventurer

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    To all. Bugger off. :)

    AB
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  11. tattoogunman

    tattoogunman Been here awhile

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    I'm not a big camper, but why would you want a wood stove to take with you? Can't you just build a fire and put a rack over it when you camp? I had always thought the point of bringing a portable stove was to have something you could burn gas or other fluids in, not some metal box you put wood in?? Or am I missing something? :ear
    #11
  12. ElMartillo

    ElMartillo I See Faces...

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    Yup, you are. By containing and focusing the combustion, a wood-burning camp stove will cook a meal with very little fuel material, perhaps equivalent to what one may need to simply start a normal sized "campfire". Large pieces of wood may not always be available, but one could cook a meal using damp fuel or even newspaper if used correctly in an efficient, small stove. Small enough, a stove similar to the above would be a good backup, whether intending to cook by liquid fuel or campfire.

    Cheers!
    #12
  13. Handy

    Handy Sunburnt

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  14. AMSBIKER

    AMSBIKER Adventurer

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    The reason I like this stove is because it can burn wood or other solid fuels or I can use the Trangia fuel burner depending where I am. Some campsites won't let you use wood over here so I have a choice. I can also use the Trangia gas burner I have so I don't have to buy anything else to fit the new stove. I can use what I already have.

    AB
    #14
  15. rjsurfer

    rjsurfer Been here awhile

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  16. AMSBIKER

    AMSBIKER Adventurer

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    I looked at at those but only burns wood etc. can't use gas or fuel burner, and the postage from the US to the UK along with the customs charge makes it a no go.

    AB
    #16
  17. K0m4

    K0m4 Been here awhile

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    I made a wood gas stove from two cans. Tutorials are readily available; this was the one I used the most for the basic design: http://www.instructables.com/id/Woodgas-Can-Stove/. Took me an evening, but I paid very little attention to neatness...

    The benefit of making it myself was i) I could determine the size and thus the potential burn time of one load of fuel, and ii) I could customise it to perfectly fit my trangia on top in case of unavailability or restrictions on fuel.
    #17
  18. bman

    bman Been here awhile

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  19. Buddy_Holly

    Buddy_Holly Imminent Train Wreck

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  20. panhead_dan

    panhead_dan motorcycle addict

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    I agree.
    I made a couple of those and use them often, even on lunch break at work. (for the price vs the whole day it took to make them, buy one from that link).
    Mine is a nice setup due to it being a complete kit.
    Using a large metal camp mug, the one available in the camping section of most stores for $5 and a plastic lid from Progresso bread crumbs (free). The stove fits inside the mug along with a ziplok bag with coffee in it and a couple of paks of instant oatmeal. It's all kept clean and secure with the plastic lid snapped on the mug. It can be attached to the bike easily by running a strap or bungie through the handle, taking up zero storage space. Another addition that also fits inside is a beer can with the top and bottom cut off and split. It's cut to length so that it fits in the mug. This is used as a wind block because the alchy stove doesn't like moving air.
    #20