Snow/winter riding information

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Dysco, Sep 21, 2004.

  1. rideLD

    rideLD The further the better!

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    Does anyone have a link for buying a stud gun and some studs. I already have a compressor. I have also seen those pre-studded tires at the back of cyclenews in the past. Does anyone have a link for Pre-studed tires?

    This is my second winter here in Nebraksa. The first one I rode everyday except the entire month of January. This year there is already snow on the ground and it is only December. I have to get some studed tires and give this a shot before I go crazy. When I was younger I used to ride an XR600 on the snowy streets of Reno with just knobbies. I crashed a few times but at that age it did not bother me. I don't heal as fast as I used to these days.

    TIA,
    #41
  2. Drif10

    Drif10 Accredited Jackass

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    Been winter riding for almost 25 years now. Rode to work this morning in 12f temps, as a matter of fact. 20-25 minute drive to work most days.

    Just using TKC's on my 640Adv. Wear a BMW helmet with a Pinlock visor. Bought that in Belgium, dunno if it's available here, but does a good job of keeping the visor clear. Heated grips, but don't bother with my vest on such a short ride.

    Didn't like steel studs on asphalt, way to squirelly, so I just go with knobbies. Used to ride an FZ750 year round, regardless of weather. Used my old rain slicks as winter rubber, worked VERY well. Wheelies at minus 30. :ricky Even dragged a peg with them on off-ramps when I was younger and dumber. Lots of stick.
    #42
  3. snowrider

    snowrider Long timer

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    Because of speeds and traffic volume, interstates maintain more surface temperature and are usually clear when everything else is slick. The problem is, sometimes they still get snowed under if there's enough coming down. When they're clear it means an easier ride home but if they're not it's an un-fun place to be. I've never gotten this one totally figured out, I still guess wrong sometimes.
    #43
  4. rideLD

    rideLD The further the better!

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    I guess I am answering my own question, but here is the place in case anyone else is interested.
    http://www.winterstuds.com
    I ordered up a set and found my old hippo-hands. I will be mounting everything up on my XR650 and hope to be back to my daily riding very soon. :thumb
    #44
  5. snowrider

    snowrider Long timer

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    I rode one winter in Nebraska getting around in small towns where maybe studs might not have totally sucked, but in a city like Omaha you should be spending well over half your time on mostly clear pavement. I don't know how it would be, never tried them, but I think they would make me unhappy in town. I'd love to get a place out of town and a stud gun.





    #45
  6. rideLD

    rideLD The further the better!

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    Yep I bet more the half the time I will be on clear roads but almost always there is some ice on them too where the snow melts and re-freezes. I'm sure the studs will be pretty squirly on dry pavement but when I hit the icey spots they should make it all worth while :D
    #46
  7. Dysco

    Dysco Puppy wrangler

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    My studs were enough to actually dig into dry pavement under heavy braking. I kept the turns slow and braked aggressively when necessary but otherwise I just took it really easy. A 21" front would probably eliminate most of the handling problems I had.

    In Denver, we get a few mornings where there's black ice from sidewalk to sidewalk in the residential areas every winter. I spun my truck last winter trying to slow down for my turn where on my bike I would have maybe fishtailed for a second and then gripped right up. In situations like that, the studs are invaluable. I always figured that it'd be worth all the effort of making the tires and running them for six months even if I only needed them once.
    #47
  8. Dysco

    Dysco Puppy wrangler

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    Those tires are not for road use. You'll really want to avoid them. All of my previous comments relate to studding DOT tires with DOT studs typically found on car tires.
    #48
  9. Dysco

    Dysco Puppy wrangler

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    There's nothing I saw about current draw on anything I read for it. It attaches directly to the poles of your battery and then connects via a coiled RCA jack to the visor. Starts heating as soon as you plug it in but it never feels very hot. If you want to try my old one out you're welcome to it if you can make it up to my neck of the woods.

    BTW- studs on your bike would last forever.
    #49
  10. snowrider

    snowrider Long timer

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    I'm enjoying that site though, just for the great pictures.
    #50
  11. Dysco

    Dysco Puppy wrangler

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    It definitely crossed my mind to pick up a set for trailriding the WR :D
    #51
  12. KL5A

    KL5A Bugs are the new black

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    I can't imagine anyone trying to ride 10/10ths on the street in the winter-like everything else, the stud/no stud is a compromise. You do lose a little dry road traction with the studs installed, but on the lake or on black ice they are very much appreciated. The black ice scenario was the real surprise for me. I was out on the highway, watching (nervously) as the cages around me slid around on the road, while I felt planted and secure. And the look on the Exploder driver's face as I rode past her after she drove right into the ditch was priceless :rofl .
    So, do the studs decrease dry traction? Yeah, they do.
    Are they worth it the reast of the time? Yeah, I believe so.

    Something that I haven't seen mentioned is the traction from your boots. The time I came closest to dropping the bike last winter was when I stopped on a pure ice surface, so slick that my boot almost went out from under me. Can you imagine trying to hoist a bike up when you can't even get good foot traction? I may stud my boots up :evil .
    #52
  13. RLK

    RLK 4,949

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    But how does the electricity keep the visor from fogging? is it like the electric defogger on the rear window of a minivan? Like a very thin energized conduit applied to the inside of the shield with insulation on one side to keep from zapping your nose? Is it a fused circuit??

    JC Whitney used to sell some stuff to repair those rear window defoggers. I'm wondering if there is a way to roll your own on this without buying a new helmet and $90 visor.

    Yeah, i'm that poor.
    #53
  14. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    I don't see why it wouldn't work, but the adhesive and little wires wouldn't do much for your vision. On the rear window it is so far away that you don't notice the wires and adhesive.

    This is why they don't use it on the windshield.

    Jim :brow
    #54
  15. RLK

    RLK 4,949

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    So how do these electric visors work? The seem pretty available through several vendors through snowmobiling dealers. Its not like HJC has cornered the market here. They all require buying a new helmet and $90 visor. There has to be a cheaper way.
    #55
  16. RLK

    RLK 4,949

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    On a face shield they would be close that as long as they are not right across your pupils you could see around them. It works for Hockey goaltenders and baseball umpires. Their masks are made of big fat bars, yet they seem to see the tiny little puck or ball and stop it or call balls and strikes pretty well most of the time.
    #56
  17. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do Super Moderator

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    Looking at the picture of the HJC heated shield, it appears that there's a loop of "heating wire" that runs along the bottom, right side, and top of the shield -- most likely between the shield layers (the HJC snowmobile shields that I've seen have been 2-layered, with a noticable air gap between them).

    [​IMG]
    #57
  18. GStupid

    GStupid Been here awhile

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    Studs and burnouts...wheelies even! The idea of shooting sparks & molten rubber at my next door nazis is almost too much.:D Unleash hell in a "keep your dog off my frickin' lawn" sort of way. Oh, and Merry Christmas!
    #58
  19. RLK

    RLK 4,949

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    OK thank you!! :thumb All that stuff about "Dual lens" on the sales websites has just been comprehended.

    I read "dual lens" and thought its for all these old guys who wear bi-focal eyeglasses with their winter helmets. I know they do.
    #59
  20. Dysco

    Dysco Puppy wrangler

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    Right. That-there dual lens thingy keeps it from fogging.

    The lame thing about the 'lectric visors is you can't buy them without all the wires to keep the cost down if you've bought more than one. The plastic is also really soft and scratches easily with road sand- the damn things are invaluable in falling snow, though.
    #60