1. FtheRedSticker

    FtheRedSticker Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    NorCal
    Quick question and yes I searched. How do you know if your 950 is a 05.5 model?
    #21
  2. Hobbes950

    Hobbes950 Darth Kitten

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,065
    Location:
    Nevada City
    Make sure you go through the H.O.W. and read about all the TSPs. I did before buying mine and knew what I was in for. I got a 2005.5 with 9,000 miles and had the clutch slave go out on me pretty quick. Did the fuel pump soon after that as preventative, and when the valve check came due I did the water pump, re-jetted carbs and few other little things. I ended up dumping more money into it a little faster than I thought I would, but am a bit at ease having it done. Only been stranded buy her once, and that was a total freak electrical fluke.
    Hopefully KTM comes through with a little something for you. On a 12 year old bike regardless of mileage, I kind of doubt it though. Keep us posted.

    I could tell the 2005.5 buy the seat. I believe the newer one had a step seat and the older ones were more flat. The heat shield on the exhaust has no holes and extends beyond the frame on the newer models too.
    #22
  3. LateNate

    LateNate Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    339
    Location:
    Walnut Shade, MO
    Had similar problems when I bought my KTM. Owner had it sitting around too long. I did all the work now she is running great. get thru all the crap and she'll be running fine. I love mine and will be trusting it coming up on a TAT trip this summer.
    #23
  4. FtheRedSticker

    FtheRedSticker Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    49
    Location:
    NorCal
    Ok. My seat has no step and I'm assuming you are speaking about the heat shield on the header pipe near the right footpeg? Mine has no holes. Is that all to look for? I suspected it would have to do with the VIN #, but I really have no clue.
    #24
  5. Hobbes950

    Hobbes950 Darth Kitten

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,065
    Location:
    Nevada City
    Hmmmm, no step means 2005, no holes on heat shield (yes that's the one) means 2005.5. I wonder if one of those is not original. Mine had both correct so I never looked any further.

    I read they widened the rear wheel from a 4" to a 4.25" as well.
    The .5 engines had a number of internal upgrades (clutch, oil jets, etc) and one major downgrade - the starter torque limiter.

    Check here and get to work on the bike. Do the needed maintenance and TSBs and you are golden.
    #25
  6. The Savage Rabbit

    The Savage Rabbit Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    85
    Location:
    Agoura Hills, CA
    KTM has agreed to provide a new stator and rotor.

    Now they want me to trade the 950 and my 2012 Softail in on a new 990 plus cash.
    #26
  7. knobbyjoe

    knobbyjoe knobbyjoe

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    544
    Location:
    N by NW of The Biggest Little City
    Hmmm, very interesting decision to make. If it is the dealer making the offer you can probably try and get the "cash" down. But just think...New KTM 990! :clap
    #27
  8. The Savage Rabbit

    The Savage Rabbit Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    85
    Location:
    Agoura Hills, CA
    As painful as it would be to get hosed on the value of the 950 and to possibly regret parting with the HD, the money I'd save by dropping from 4 bikes (which is just wasteful) to 2 (new 990 and the Ducati 848) would help recoup the loss on the 950 each year. The dealer says they can move the panniers and GPS mount over to a new 990 and are checking to see if the Akropovics on the 950 can be moved to the FI 990.

    KBB puts the HD's trade in value at about $13,500, the 950 at $4,400, and the KLR at $2,500. The KLR just sits now.

    This weekend's cold-ass ride to Tonopah will sort out a lot of hard decisions, which decisions primarily rest on how much I think I'd miss the HD.

    But I'm happy that KTM stepped up and is covering most of the cost to fix the stator issue. That makes sticking with a KTM product possible.
    #28
  9. Nowwhat

    Nowwhat I'll Go Second...

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,083
    Location:
    On the Ground Laughing
    Sell the KLR for a couple grand....put that money into the perfectly good low mileage 950..and ride the hell out of it...That bike looked great.....
    #29
  10. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    8,553
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    My experience of these things is that a good dealer will usually apply some pressure on KTM and you'll get the outcome you desire, or close to it. Best to let these things run their course. Glad it worked out for you, now you're left with a harder decision about thinning the herd :D

    If it was me, I'd sell the KLR and Harley privately, pocket the cash and just keep the 950. Tell the dealer you appreciate their efforts and they'll have your business next time.
    #30
  11. The Savage Rabbit

    The Savage Rabbit Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    85
    Location:
    Agoura Hills, CA
    That would be the easiest thing to do. I could use the money for the KLR to pay for a new fuel pump and some of the other suggested fixes. I have no mechanical skills or experience so doing this type of stuff myself is waaaay over my head. Then I just have the guilt of the 950 being slightly duplicative of the Harley in that the 950 can do everything the Harley can do on the road.
    #31
  12. ykrweb

    ykrweb 1% Spawn

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Oddometer:
    82
    Location:
    Bay Area
    #32
  13. The Savage Rabbit

    The Savage Rabbit Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    85
    Location:
    Agoura Hills, CA
    Cooler? Oh, dude, you must not have seen my chaps, fingerless gloves, the bitchen leather tassles I have comin' off the grips, and my 1/4 helmet with the Kaiser spike on the top. You don't know me! You don't know my crew! Sorry, I get carried away when in "harley guy" mode.

    Ya, I commute on my bikes. I have a facebook page called Motorcycle Commuter. Started it because the webforums usually didn't talk about commuting issues.
    #33
  14. Bgunn

    Bgunn Mucha distancia

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,444
    Location:
    Rockford Wa

    :lol3 Got pics?

    Glad to here that KTM stepped up.
    #34
  15. DesertSurfer

    DesertSurfer Tail sprayin

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,556
    Location:
    City of the Angels
    Hey TSR,

    Dump the other bikes and keep the 950. Owning an early Adventure is the best way to get introduced into the product line. 8k miles is break in for that bike. There are nuances to these bikes that as everyone has suggested you need to familiarize yourself with in the HOW. You will need to get several good service resources/ mechanics if you don't trust yourself with a wrench. Service on these bikes is not cheap. Basic oil and filter changes require a shop to bill you for tank removal. There is a series of part upgrades that keep this bike reliable... it's the price of admission here. You just have to bite the bullet and pay to play.

    But the ride experience it well worth the fees. Once you get caught up on upgrades you will reach a point where the overhead goes down and the fun factor goes through the roof. And the Adventure is a bike you'll continue to grow into. The best part is when you are dialing in your preference of travel bags and multi day camping trips. Then you'll know you've truly arrived!!!

    [​IMG]

    Welcome to the party.
    #35
  16. Deepc

    Deepc Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    299
    Location:
    St. Petersburg, Florida
    I feel your pain. I bought a black 2005.5 with 6500 miles in 2011. Since then, I have replaced the water pump seal, battery, fuel pump, and clutch slave. I'm pretty sure my next project is the starter torque limiter. She clacks a little on start up. I did all the work myself but the $$$ for parts adds up fast. The ex girlfriend couldn't understand why I kept a motorcycle that needed so much work but then again she never drove it:D I would suggest learning how to work on the bike. You will save some money and more importantly gain some knowledge that could save your ass if you ever take her off the beaten path. Good luck.
    #36
  17. TwoTiredRiders

    TwoTiredRiders Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    101
    Location:
    The Keystone State
    I tend to agree with learning to service wear items yourself. I have a small shop and restore old Hondas and Yamahas to control my ADD or whatever it is called when you can't sit still or watch TV.
    I replaced the clutch slave cylinder which was leaking on my 2004 KTM 950 ADV and various other wear type items.
    Obviously I don't have electronic equipment or "special" tools so would leave any major repairs to my local KTM shop.
    I've been dealing with them and KTM for over 25 years. (1986 KTM 250, evil and wicked machine).
    Oh, and there is a video of how to replace nearly anything on You Tube. Spend a few minutes watching it and then go out and do it.
    It's also good to learn what to do when you rip the wires out of the kickstand safety switch while accidentally taking a hero section with the wife on the back, in the rain, at the Hancock Dual Sport.
    Hint: at least two of the three have to be stripped and wired together or your bike will start and run great until you let the clutch out.
    Thank you dirt bike rider who stopped to help us with that basic knowledge. I was ready to push pull or walk but we were in an extreme location with deep mud and huge rocks, thus the initial hit.
    Which two wires? He said try these two, "it will either work or catch on fire" more likely blow a fuse, lol.
    It worked. I've kept it taped up with the same electrical tape since then. No safety switch.
    #37
  18. HooliKen

    HooliKen Awesome is a flavor

    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,031
    Location:
    Smithfield, VA
    There are three kinds of KTM owners. Group 1: Those with abundant disposable income to let a dealer do all the work. Group 2: Those who are comfortable wrenching on a bike so do just about everything themselves. Group 3: Those who know the way to get knowledgable friends to help them involves offering beer and possibly some steaks on the grill.

    Moral of the story is if you are not currently a member of Group 2 or 3 I suggest you become a member.

    Outside of a complete engine rebuild requiring machining and/or ridiculously expensive speciality tools there is nothing mysterious or out of the ordinary about working on a 950. I have rejetted, performed valve adjustments, done the H2O pump etc. Nothing to it that a little bit of mechanical skill and patience will overcome. Only thing to date that I have had done outside or my own garage is the suspension, simply due to the fact that my lovely wife does not like hearing me cuss that much. :D
    #38
  19. The Savage Rabbit

    The Savage Rabbit Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Oddometer:
    85
    Location:
    Agoura Hills, CA
    I'm leaning towards keeping the 950. i have zero experience in working on anything mechanical and the leople i know who do, know nothing about motorcycles. Presently, it sounds like the only way to be able to trust the bike is to have a shop preemptively replace the fuel pump, check the bolts on the clutch pressure plates, and replace (?) the clutch slave cylinder. Clearly, doing it myself would be ideal. But I am so clueless about working on machines that it seems impossible to do myslef. I don't even know what a clutch slave cylinder is. I accept that I may get flamed for that. My dad taught me to hunt. We never did anything mechanical. He didn't even change his own tires. I think I'm the only one in my family who has ever changed their own oil. So, paying a shop to get this 950 on the road and reliable now seems to be my only option.

    Pay the money to make the 950 reliable or simplify my stable of bikes by replacing the 950 and the Softail with a 990? That's my current quandary. Which, is of course a nice problem to have. Would be nice to reduce my insurance and registration costs. I rode the Softail 400 miles to Tonopah today. Bike just isn't as fun as the 950/990 platform. It's 10 degrees here right now, by the way. Last 30 miles were on a frozen highway.

    Are the new 990s generally more reliable? Seems like 90% of the known problems on the HOW pertain to the 950s. Granted, they're older. But the 990 has been around for awhile.
    #39
  20. TwoTiredRiders

    TwoTiredRiders Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    101
    Location:
    The Keystone State
    Savage rabbit, consolidate and update. I'm all about reducing the amount of vehicles that require inspection and insurance. I have a ton, (several dozen vintage bikes) but have no regrets about keeping them around as they aren't costing me anything or going down in value. It drives me crazy to see a bike unused and depreciating at the same time!
    Having a shop do your work is great if you know them. They will do the work in a clean, well lit environment with the correct factory tools and manuals. It's best to recognize that you are not mechanically inclined and not screw stuff up or make a mess in a shop or garage you may not even have. I have a well lit shop with a wood stove and air lift table. I have only basic repair skills but enjoy light maintenance: changing chains and sprockets, fluids, certain seals, accessories, etc... I love working on the bikes. If you don't have the set up for it just take it into the shop.
    I'm all in and rolling the dice with my new 990 R. One of the last of the breed. My 950 was great after working out all of the 2004 problems. It was a beast. We had water pump issues ( I think the shop said the impeller may have actually been in backwards or something, I forget but they finally sorted it out.) I like the idea of EFI and staying updated, thus the 990.
    For ME: Harley's are one of those bikes that you don't really love to ride or own but miss them when you don't have them. I keep buying them and selling them. I've sworn off buying any more because I know I will just want to sell it then.
    Now your Ducati, that's another story. I have a sweet spot for track bikes and recently got my racing license and competed in my first few CCS races. That's the best thing ever, besides dual sporting and road trips.
    #40