So we've all heard/seen the 650 xchallenge...let's see your XCOUNTRY!

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Olas, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. Pescador

    Pescador Adventurer

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  2. Dutchgit

    Dutchgit Completely clogless

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    Straight fit !
    You'll need to take the fork legs out of the triples but it's easy enough.

    You might want the hardware as well.
  3. c-m

    c-m Long timer

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    Sorry,

    I know this has been asked 100 times, but I can't find it now.

    What are all the differences between xCountry models?

    I know that one is taller than the other, one has a steel subframe, one of them has removable pillion pegs. I just don't know which is which.

    Thanks
  4. Dutchgit

    Dutchgit Completely clogless

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    Basically: The early ones 2007/2008 are black, have an aluminium subframe, demountable passenger footpegs, high suspension, have the Rotax engine.
    The later ones 2009 (and possibly some from 2008 ?) are yellow, have the steel subframe with welded on passenger footpegs, lower suspension and have the Loncin engine (which is just as good as the Rotax one.)
    The yellow ones also have adjustable clutch/brake levers and different mirrors.
  5. Dorito

    Dorito Dreamer and Doer

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    Jul 31, 2010
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    6,912
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    Maryland
    i am having an intermittent problem. bike wants to stall out when the clutch is pulled in. restarts fine, but then stalls out again. happens after motor is warm. seems to continue these spasms for 15 mins or so, then stops. runs fine under load/higher rpm. cycling the kill switch, and played a bit with the clutch adjustment, eventually runs normally as it started. any ideas?
  6. Square1

    Square1 Been here awhile

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    How many miles has your bike.

    Could be old oil and time for an oil change or if you have more then 23-25k miles you might need a new clutch cover and release mechanism.

    M
  7. Dutchgit

    Dutchgit Completely clogless

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    It might be the switch on the sidestand. (Asuming the bike dies when you put it in gear when you pull the clutch.)




    Just adding a few pics because I can hahahaha (evil laugh)

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  8. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

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    2,802
    Okay, coming fresh off the steering head bearing replacement, I tackled the rear swingarm. I may have some experience that will help others doing the same job.

    I had fully expected to find my bearings dry and rusty since there have been accounts of these being not adequately greased at the factory. In fact, with about 24,000 miles on the XCountry, the bearings were very good, soaked with grease and needed no attention.

    Since, I had already purchased all the needed seals, I proceeded to remove and replace all the seals as well as clean out the old grease and re-lube the needle bearings.


    1. Begin by removing the rear wheel and everything attached to the swingarm - cables, wires, chain and sprocket guards etc.

    After doing this, support the rear of the swingarm with something to hold it up.

    Using an Allen bit and extension remove the bolt and nut that holds the lower shock absorber eye on the swing arm. You do not need to remove the shock.

    2. Then, with a hex Allen bit, unscrew the rider's left side swingarm pin from the frame. Note there is a plastic washer or spacer under its head. This pin screws through a flanged inner race and tightens together when this pin is torqued down.

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    3. Remove the three small screws from the flange of the pin on the right side. Although this pin has a hex recess, it is not screwed into anything but rather presses into the internal race of the needle bearings. There is no tightening torque on this side.

    [​IMG]

    The shoulder of this pin can become corroded/crudded-up and stuck to the frame member bore through which it is inserted before going into the enclosed needle bearing cup on the right side of the swingarm.

    After removing the three small screws, you can turn the pin with a hex drive and hopefully it will break loose and part from the frame a little. It probably will not just come off.

    I then took a sharpened screwdriver are carefully worked it into the crack between the flange and the frame. This moved the flanged pin out enough for me to insert a larger screwdriver. Working the pin with an Allen and gently twisting the screwdriver easily got the pin free from the bike.

    Even better, there is an 8MM threaded hole in the bottom of the hex hole into which you can thread a bolt etc and use a slide hammer etc to simply jerk the pin out if it is tight. Mine was not so tight.

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    (remove the outer 3 screws first!)
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    4. Once the two pins are out, you can work the swingarm free.

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    I was amazed at how light it is, less than 10 pounds total.

    [​IMG]

    My needles looked good with plenty of grease still present.

    [​IMG]


    5. Remove the 2 seals from left side swingarm ear by prying them out with a screwdriver.

    [​IMG]

    This is the plastic washer/spacer and the old outside seal from the left ear. Note the recess into which the plastic washer/spacer fits on the swingarm casting.

    [​IMG]


    6. The right side bearing is in a blind cup since it does not have a through-pin that tightens up on it. Remove the seal from the right side bearing cup.

    [​IMG]

    7. This is everything set out in order of assembly.

    From the picture left to right-

    a. The right side flanged pin with sealing o-ring on it.

    b. The right side inner race that goes into the needle bearing cup and then receives the flanged pin.

    c. The right side seal that seals the right side bearing cup.

    d. The flanged inner bearing race for the left side. Note the black plastic washer/spacer goes under the head of this flange not outside it. I have it sitting on the outside in this pic but it goes under the head of that flange.

    e. The green inside needle bearing seal.

    f. The green outside needle bearing seal.

    g. The outside flanged pin with the black plastic washer/spacer under its head.

    [​IMG]

    8. The bearings are pressed into the swingarm and must be pressed out if they need replacing. Read the service manual about installing new bearings since they must be pressed back in with enough depth to allow for the seals and spacers.

    9. Clean and repack the needles with grease if you are not replacing them. Install new seals. Slip-in the inner races for the bearings being certain to have the plastic washer/spacer UNDER the flange of the inner race for the left side assembly. Also be certain that the plastic washers/spacers fit down into their machined recesses provided in the swingarm casting.

    **********PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THESE PLASTIC SPACERS ON THE LEFT SIDE. BOTH OF THEM GO UNDER THE HEADS OF THEIR RESPECTIVE FLANGES AND THEY FIT DOWN INTO THE RECESSES IN THE SWINGARM EARS. WORK THE INSIDE WASHER/SPACER INTO ITS RECESS BEFORE INSERTING THE FLANGE INNER RACE INTO THE NEEDLES. THE OUTSIDE IS EASIER TO FIT SINCE YOU CAN SEE IT. *********


    10. Using your swingarm support, work the swingarm back into proper position in the frame, slipping the shock absorber eye back to its slot and aligning the swingarm ears for their respective pins.

    11. The manual says insert the right side pin first but I threaded in the left side a short distance first. I then greased up the right side pin and wiped some anti-seize compound inside the frame bore and inserted the pin into the bearing cup of the swingarm. The manual advised putting thread lock on the three small screws screws of the right side flange.

    12. Install the wheel and chain along with everything that attaches to the swingarm.


    .
  9. motorrat

    motorrat Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the good write-up and detailed pics!

    in the right pin is Metric thread behind the Hex, so if it is stuck don`t ruin your pin by trying to pry it out with a screwdriver.
    Make yourself a puller with two smaller side bolts and in the middle the bolt screwed in the pin, an naditional nut will be the way to pull out a stubborn pin.
  10. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

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    ? say what?

    The rider's right pin that is attached to the frame by the three small screws has no threads anywhere on it. It slips through a hole in the frame and into the separate inner race of the needle bearings. The three small screws around the outer flange holds the pin in place.

    Only the rider's left side pin has threads involved.

    Yes, you are correct. I originally misunderstood your comment to mean that the right pin threaded onto something.

    There is a 8MM threaded hole deep in the hex hole of the right pin, as you say, to provide an attachment for pulling the right pin.

    Thankfully my pin was not difficult to remove and pulled out with a spin of the pin. For difficult situations, a bolt threaded into the access hole and a slide hammer etc should help remove the right pin.

    Thanks.

    (remove the 3 outer screws first!)
    [​IMG]
  11. Dorito

    Dorito Dreamer and Doer

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    6,912
    Location:
    Maryland
    The bike is an 2009 with 14,000 miles on it. Just changed the oil 2000 miles ago. Is the clutch cover a 2009 issue also?

    Hrm, unless it's intermittent. I would think that it wouldn't run at higher RPMs if it had a side-stand switch issue. It was also stalling out in netural. Here's some pics though of the last weeks riding;

    I think we found the largest unfinished Inukshuk
    [​IMG]

    I always love the subtle paradox of bikes and things that fly!
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  12. c-m

    c-m Long timer

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    Well I'm torn.

    A steel sub-frame is much better for touring especially when the GF is on the back. The pillion pegs also look further back on the yellow ones.

    Removable pillion pegs of the earlier models would mean they would potentially be repositioned, and the taller ride height would be a bonus.
  13. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

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    If you properly spring the rear shock on the 09 bikes and set proper sag, you will gain ride height. I am 6-2 and I'm not sure I can totally flat-foot my little bike with both feet straddling the Corbin seat. I don't think I'd want it any taller.
  14. Square1

    Square1 Been here awhile

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    Next time you change the oil , after draining the oil take the clutch cover off.
    On the inside of the cover there is a hole were the clutch release pin sits in.
    Measure if this hole is round or oval from the steel pin working in the aluminum cover.
    Also inspect the gears on the clutch release pin and the actuator shaft.

    Just a little bit of extra play and your clutch will not release.

    You don't have many miles on your bike.
    Maybe it is just not adjusted right or you used an oil that is not rated for a wet clutch.

    M
  15. motorrat

    motorrat Been here awhile

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    Deeply hidden behind the centre Hex there is aM8 thread on the RHS pin.
    There for use with a slide hammer, or pulley.
    Maybe it differs with my `07 stuff
  16. Bli55

    Bli55 -

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  17. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

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    Now that would be a handy thing to have ! Also, thanks for the links.
  18. icbraz

    icbraz n00b

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    Your bike looks great, this is what I am aiming for :) The extra fuel, the high fender the head lights, really nice. I only wish I could make the saddle a little higher, I am a bit tall to this bike, the only options I found here in Europe for alternative saddles are really high end and very expensive, too fancy for me.
  19. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

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    That looks pretty darned clean to me. Maybe you've already cleaned it.

    I've not heard about anyone having a defective actuator. Normally, it's just a matter of the needle and seat getting junked-up. If you clean it and occasionally run some extra cleaner in your fuel, you should be okay. Thankfully, I do not have these issues.

    If you suspect the actuator is bad, a new one is not cheap. US list is almost $100.

    Unfortunately, a malfunction could be from the electronics that control the actuator.
  20. Bli55

    Bli55 -

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    Whenever I turn the key on, all light except the coolant light switch on together with the display as a test. Then only the needed ones stay on and display goes back to normal.
    Once this is complete, I switch on the engine kill switch.
    Fuel pump makes a pump, and the coolant light flashes 3 times.

    After that, ready to start.