so who rides in the rain on pavement & what can you teach me?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by robfilms, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. James Adams

    James Adams ɹǝsn uʍop ǝpᴉsdn Administrator

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    I've recently discovered the magnificence commonly known as Gore-Tex, which keeps you dry and cool at the same time.
    #81
  2. Mambo Dave

    Mambo Dave Backyard Adventurer

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    What I know of Gore-Tex is that it can be waterproof, and will keep you dry... but sweat will pool in it and not really get out. And have no doubt about it, Gore-Tex lined boots are hotter. Maybe it doesn't make as much of a difference in motorcycle since we don't walk much in those boots, but I was never a Gore Tex guy for hiking boots.
    #82
  3. mike884

    mike884 Been here awhile

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    I find that Gore-Tex claims are a bit overdone. They are waterproof, but I have not found them to be more breathable than anything else, I hate the clammy sweatiness it induces.
    #83
  4. Dismount

    Dismount Boring bastard

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    The problem with all waterproof footwear is the giant gaping hole in the top.
    #84
  5. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    Don't tuck your pants in the top.......:D
    #85
  6. Dismount

    Dismount Boring bastard

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    I need some pants that zip to my boots above the ankle somewhere. I always manage to get the water pushed up my boots and then it runs down into the damn things.

    Get home, take off boot, Empty 3 gallons of rain out of boot, squish inside in frozen socks.
    #86
  7. DR Donk

    DR Donk Been here awhile

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    Another concern when riding in the wet is the temperature. If it is below freezing, well, that's obvious. However, yesterday I was riding the 20 miles home from work in 42 degree light rain. It was raining just enough to make things slippery but what was worse was the cold temperature. I was taking the corners carefully but was suprised when the rear started to slide around. When I got home I felt the tires and they didn't even feel warm. I think the problem was that because it was so cold the tires never got up to the temperature that they should for proper adhesion and that combined with the slippery roads made for a interesting ride home yesterday. :eek1
    #87
  8. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    Cut a couple heavy rubber bands from an old inner tube and slip them over the pants bottoms to seal the water out.

    I've also used the plastic boot covers made for pesticide applicators. They have an elastic top and come up over the calf.
    #88
  9. atomicalex

    atomicalex silly aluminum boxes

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    Don't most pants have Velcros on the bottoms to cinch the pantlegs down? Mine do....

    Comments on GoreTex are interesting. My Dainese non-GT boots lasted less than a year before they started leaking, so I'll likely be upgrading to the GT version in hopes tha they last a bit longer. Either those or the spiffy Daytonas I like.
    #89
  10. dbuzz

    dbuzz Citizen of the world

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    This man sounds like he speaks form both necessity and experience :D








    (and then I noted KLR in his sig) :rofl




    :lol3
    #90
  11. Barry

    Barry Just Beastly

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    I think you guys with wet feet are doing it wrong. I run waterproof boots year round. My feet sweat like crazy in general, and my waterproof boots don't bother me in the least, no more than sneakers.

    Also, I run some AeroStitch pants and have never had a problem with them or any other rain gear allowing water into my boots.

    That said, I agree wholeheartedly with staying warm. You are distracted and do not function optimally if you are chilled. Being cold on a bike is unsafe... and uncomfortable.

    Barry
    #91
  12. Fufo

    Fufo Adventurer

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    Well, I have always an extra clothes on my bike, after 30-45 min of heavy rain I couldnt find a good waterproof suit!

    But I think the worst thing is to drive at night when is rainy, cannot see anything!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tg7D5q80rM
    #92
  13. Mambo Dave

    Mambo Dave Backyard Adventurer

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    I did a ton of my commuting during the night hours ... and rain ... but all of it was on lit roads. Specifically, a lit superhighway for 35 miles each way, plus lit main thoroughfares. On the highway I was riding most all lights are mounted in the middle (on the Jersey Barriers), so in the rain at night it would be the left-most lanes I'd usually use just to see as well as possible.

    I've come within inches of ghetto wanderers who typically start moving at night when I couldn't see them at all between the night, the rain, and the intermittent street lights causing light and dark spots on the side roads. I'll never understand why they chose to step out from the median when they did just to have that close of a call with my bike, but had I kept doing the route I was seriously considering installing metal hand/lever guards on that cruiser just to keep from breaking a hand when I would hit someone. Thankfully I quit that job.

    Anyways, there is another tip for the OP if he decides to ride through Florida. The really random placement of ghettos and section-8 housing means that night pedestrian traffic will be higher in certain areas, and mixing the limited visibility of rain with it just makes matters worse. Be careful.
    #93
  14. glenn2926

    glenn2926 Been here awhile

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    Here in the UK we are not allowed to ride on the pavement even when it's raining. The pavement is for pedestrians.:D
    #94
  15. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

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    Yes. Several times. See the wiki link on hydroplaning posted elsewhere in this thread. Also, there are vids of dirt bikes crossing large ponds of water while completely on 'plane' at about 65mph on ADV. Near as I can tell, NOBODY on a bike carves a turn while on plane.

    Very generally, the long, narrow contact patch of the front wheel does a good job of slicing thru water and leaving some rubber on the pavement. Think of the front wheel as like a battle ship at sea that does not come up on 'plane' mostly because it does not have a flat bottom like a car tire. That said. the front bike wheel will come up on plane given enough speed and water. The poster who said that he rides the x-way at 80mph in the rain w/o hydroplanning very likely does not have enough water on the pavement. Road engineers are well aware of hydroplanning and do their very best to keep rain water sheeting off the roadway.

    Again, very generally, Cages tend to hydroplane with good tread depth tires at about 50-55mph in very little depth of standing water. Bikes will start hydroplaning in the same conditions at about 65mph. Due to the shape of the bike's front contact patch, it is possible to run a nearly bald (in the middle) front tire in the rain with very little loss of traction. Before anybody goes nutz about this, we are talking about a good clean road with nothing but rain on it.
    Figure that if the cages slow down due to hydroplaning, bikes are going to need to slow down too as traffic is worse than traction.

    If hydropaning was the worst/only part of the traction problem, we could compensate for that and do well. Knowing that we need to stay out of standing water at speed is good. We can ride in the cage tracks knowing that there is less water there. But any place that has standing water will have crud/slime collecting at the bottom of the puddle unless it is splashed away. How a rider decides that a given bit of standing water is splashed free of crud is not addressed here. Some riders crashing in 1/2" of standing water at 45mph may blame it on hydroplaning when the real reason is the slime on the bottom or the slick painted line. Touching the brakes while rolling thru puddles is not recommended. Let's fantasize that we are riding along a road at 65mph and come to a flooded depression. The edge of the road may be under a cuppla inches of water with the centerline crown under only 1/4". Good luck making the decision and execution for that given whatever traffic and conditions prevail at the moment.

    Figure that if it is easy to spin-up the rear wheel in the rain, it is going to be easy to lock the front brake.
    YMMV
    #95
  16. W4lnutz

    W4lnutz Adventurer

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    I ride year around and I have found that slow and easy are best but dont doddle in the intersectons and the rest has been said a dozen times!:deal
    #96
  17. TheMuffinMan

    TheMuffinMan Forest Ranger Magnet

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    Besides saying dry the only thing I ever worry about is painted lines, brick crosswalks, and other "alternate" road materials. Painted lines are probably the biggest and most common thing. They are much slicker when wet. Depending on your bike and tires you'll have to watch out for hydroplaning. I almost always run a semi-agressive knobby so I don't worry much about it but more street oriented tires might.

    Other then that just give other drivers lots of room for stupidity and life'll be good. Enjoy! :freaky
    #97