So you ride a pushie hey - The Aus Bicycling Thread

Discussion in 'Australia' started by clarky, Dec 27, 2009.

  1. Adventurepig

    Adventurepig the bike, not me !

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    Yer..but I like your avatar. risky!
  2. mekros

    mekros Adventurer

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    A bit late... still looking for trails?
  3. Nandewar

    Nandewar Sound sound the clarion

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    Between a rock and a hard place
    Just got a new bike. First MTB for 28 years. I have had 6 punctures in my first 25 km. The tyres and tubes are paper thin.
    My touring bike had thick tubes and kevlar tyres, but I didn't ride tracks and trails.
    My new tyres and rims are tubeless ready, so should I spend $$$ on rim tape, valves and goo and go tubeless, or stick with tubes and buy armour plating?

    What's the point of a freaking mountain bike if a cat head on the track kills it.
  4. Bluetonguejak

    Bluetonguejak Pretend racer

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    Tubeless is the way to go.
    Stans sealant works well.
  5. rocketwheel

    rocketwheel neil

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    I run 36 to 38 psi and ride really rocky tracks and I rarely get a puncture. Just like off road motorcycles, it's a trade off between grip and flats :)
  6. Dr AT

    Dr AT Long timer

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    Check the puncture resistance of the tyres it came with - it may be worth investing in something a bit more robust at the same time you upgrade to tubeless ?
  7. jardine

    jardine 86

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    I run the Maxxis Ikon tubless and Stans sealant, I have ridden that combo in the Mallee across serious 3 corner jack country where the tyres have picked up dozens of jacks and stayed up for the ride, once you pull them out you have to spin the tyres so the sealant fills the holes. Worked for me.
    DeLewis likes this.
  8. Nandewar

    Nandewar Sound sound the clarion

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    Thanks all. Looks like tubeless is the go. If they will stand up to 3 corner jacks I'm in. Years ago in the WA Wheatbelt I ran heavy tubes, heavy tyres and goo. That was before tubeless and presta valves. I reckon there was more goo than rubber after a ride around a few salt lakes. Double gees / 3 corner jacks everywhere.
    Christine94 likes this.
  9. OC

    OC Long timer

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    I don't worry much about the jack resistance of a tyre only the bigger stuff. I assume it is a given that jacks are getting through and it is on the sealant performance to keep the air in.

    TBH, I don't think much of latex sealants like Stan's in MTB tyres whether they're tubed or tubeless. Stan's imo is just okay in road bike tyres. The stuff dries out and needs to be replaced every few months too - if you're not a 'cyclist' this can be a bit of a drag.

    My preference is for 80ml of anaerobic sealant (think super glue - remove air and it sets up) like Slime's automotive products (not their bicycle products which iirc are latex based). By time my tyres and tubes are finished they usually have hundreds, if not thousands of little brown studs from jacks that have broken off and little green plugs where the jack has come out. I can't place the end of a pencil on the tread of a tyre without it touching either and before I started using sealants I couldn't get more than a couple of hundred metres without a puncture. Stan's doesn't survive the briar patch.
    If the tyre ever goes down, usually overnight and because the sealant didn't reach the hole properly, just give it a spin and re-inflate. It is too effective in some cases. It''ll plug the end of a 100ml hydroponic syringe or a presta valve with the core removed if I fiddle around... it goes in fast or I have to clear the plugs and start again. Easy with tubeless.

    The con is that in comparison to latex it is a mess to deal with - the reason I don't like it in motos and tyre fitters hate it.

    Regarding tubeless... I'm using Schwalbe Procores which are very similar in principle to motorcycle Tubliss (which I also use). They'll keep the tyre properly seated (dirt in the bead can be problematic) and expensive carbon rims off the ground at low pressures and remove most of the headaches people encounter fitting tubeless tyres - they can be seated with a micro pump.

    If you're just wanting to get out and ride occasionally and don't want to spend hundreds or spend hours fiddling I'd recommend just pushing some Slime into tubes.
    Christine94 likes this.
  10. theMISSIONARY

    theMISSIONARY hunting and riding!!

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    i dont know how or when this thread disappeared off my sub list

    My Current rides
    2016 Giant Reign2(with a replacement Reign 1 frame) Hope pro4 wheels,minions,1x10 (32t oval with 11-42),150mm dropper,785mm bars 35mm stem sixpack racing.
    [​IMG]

    2006 kona Stab Supreme....so i can throw it and myself DH without killing the reign.
    [​IMG]

    2005 giant Trance(the first model) throw together from bits
    [​IMG]

    2004 Giant NRS1 Composite 2x10...still trying to break the frame with my fat guts
    [​IMG]
    jardine, Reeksy, OC and 2 others like this.
  11. Reeksy

    Reeksy high state of hiatus

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    So, there must be a good reason, but why is it that wheel bearings on an mtb last me 6 months, yet my WR250R has gone 60,000km without needing a change?

    Attached Files:

    theMISSIONARY likes this.
  12. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    What hubs?
    What conditions - mud, water sand dust.. ?
  13. Reeksy

    Reeksy high state of hiatus

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    Hope Pro Evo 2 ... not seeing a great deal of mud, plenty of dust, a bit of water. ~3,000km, including a decent amount of road. I believe they're stainless inside, so will replace with good quality steel and see how that goes. $70 for 5 of the best priced Japanese bearings I can find.
  14. Warin

    Warin Retired

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    Easy enough to replace cartridge bearings.
    When you get them out have a look inside the seals for rust, dirt... your not pressure washing them?

    Not seeing any negative reviews yet.
  15. Not the Messiah

    Not the Messiah Old enough to know better, but slow learnin'

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    Axial load is the biggest killer of cycle bearings. Many wheel hub and even some bottom bracket designs don't make it easy or even possible to check or adjust the sideways load on the bearings.
    The best results I've had BMX race bike wheels is to use a socket (or the outer race of an old bearing with the outside ground down a whisker) to give the outer race a tap or two with a hammer to push them inwards a poofteenth. Then when you tighten the axle nuts (or quick release) the inner race will be pulled inwards too and hopefully leave the bearing with no axial (sideways) pre-load. Depending on how tight the bearing is fitting in the hub the tap or two with a hammer are "light" to "nearly firm".
    And of course make sure that the bore of the hub is clean before you push the bearing in. Any crap behind the bearing outer race will stop it going in far enough to allow the inner race spacer to do it's thing, and you'll always have side-load on the bearings.
    If the seal design allows you to, pick the seal out and check the amount of grease in there - many new bearings have bugger all. I like to fill them up on the basis that this leaves less room for water and crap.

    And of course there's also the issue of size. Bike wheel bearings are so damn small that the pressures on the components are probably way higher than those in a similar location in a motorbike. So the bicycle bearings are always going to have a shorter life because they're stressed higher.

    Cheers
    Brian
    Reeksy, DeLewis and OC like this.
  16. OC

    OC Long timer

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    That covers it very well. :thumb

    Probably worth checking the run out on the axles and hubs too if riders are particularly hard on their gear and issues are ongoing.
  17. theMISSIONARY

    theMISSIONARY hunting and riding!!

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    the Hope pro 2's seemed a bit random in the bearings(i havent had the Pro2's) but the Pro 4's are really good......i am a fat bastard and currently have over 1000km's on them, a mate is larger than i and has had them longer.
    chuck some new bearings in...and be happy they are not Shimanos

    my WRr is at 66000km's ;) standard bearings :D
    FLICKIT likes this.
  18. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

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    Something wrong Reeksy. Never had to do wheel bearings on any of my bikes all the years I rode, and that was all off road, mud and dust.
    How tight are your quick release?
  19. darren70

    darren70 KTM, Ready To Spend

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    Do push bikes have bearings??
    bigborett likes this.
  20. Reeksy

    Reeksy high state of hiatus

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    The guys at the bearing shop reckoned a lot of the bike bearings are cheap Chinese. I got some Japanese good quality NTN ones ... but my frigging tool won't even get the sram XD cassette off so took it to the LBS before I wreck the cassette and I want to ride tomorrow. I'll have a look and see what comes out.

    He didn't seem to think it was unusual for the bearings to be shot


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