Socket Head Cap Screw Problem

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Hootowl, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. Hootowl

    Hootowl Long timer

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    I've been looking at micro torches today that run on butane. Might work. Frame rails limit access
    Thanks
    Richard
    #41
  2. Hootowl

    Hootowl Long timer

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    Plenty of good ideas
    Thanks
    #42
  3. Benesesso

    Benesesso Long timer

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    Thanks. Just had my monthly blood test today, and started round 11 of chemo. So far it's working well, but it isn't a permanent cure. Nothing is except bone marrow/stem cell transplant, and for me that is a last ditch consideration (~50% survival rate, even with my brother being a perfect match). As long as I don't get ACL (nasty form of leukemia) I will avoid the transplant.

    One of the very few minor side effects from the chemo is really weird. After day 2 (of 7 in a row) of the triple injections, I would almost always get some lower jaw pain that night. The specialist doc couldn't figure it out. I had him look it up on the 'net and sure enough he found it, that a very small % of patients taking this chemo report the jaw pain. Pain wasn't severe, and a couple mg. of Percocet took care of it.

    Last round one of my injection nurses told me to take 2 Tums that evening. I did, and no pain at all. She was rewarded with a nice chocolate/raspberry cake from a real good bakery here. Tomorrow night will be the proof, to see if it was a fluke or if the Tums (calcium) really works. Besides being real smart, she is an absolute doll--married tho.

    If I have no pain tomorrow night, I'm going to get her an incredibly good 7 layer cake--$25! Hmmm, maybe I'll take half.

    :clap
    #43
  4. Benesesso

    Benesesso Long timer

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    Don't think so. The bolt is surrounded with oil, so corrosion should not be involved. Might be best to MIG weld something to the head and back it out. Unlike most US socket head cap screws (SHCS), some of the foreign ones are pretty soft--thus the rounded socket.

    I'd replace them with at least metric grade 10.9, and 12.9 is even better. 12.9's are even harder and stronger than most US SHCSs.
    #44
  5. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    you can screw around with all these other methods, or spend 30 seconds with a hammer and chisel. you can even cut the slot with the chisel. you don't even need a 1/4 turn. you don't need to be at an exact right angle to it - even a bit of an angle and downward, and enough to turn the head left just a bit.
    #45
  6. Hootowl

    Hootowl Long timer

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    I'll try that tomorrow.
    My only concern is that if the bolt was over torqued enough to cause the socket to strip is a hammer & chisel going to be enough?
    I'll find out
    Richard
    #46
  7. pennswoodsed

    pennswoodsed lizards,bugs and me

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    Am I missing something about dropping motor ? I wouldn't risk sending chips and shards into something like this 990 engine. Drop motor , remove fastener(s all needed) clean area thoroughly. Reinstall engine, Change oil,Ride!
    Regards,Ed
    #47
  8. rapidoxidationman

    rapidoxidationman Easily trainable

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    dunno if it's been suggested yet:

    An extractor that has been ground down at the tip so it won't bottom out in the socket before getting a solid bite on the walls. Worked for me more than once.

    Edit: the greasey monkey on post 29 beat me to it...
    #48
  9. Hootowl

    Hootowl Long timer

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    Everything but the bolt head is covered with rags. I'm extremely obsessed with cleanliness around any open engine area.
    Even if the engine is removed from the frame the problem of contamination remains.
    The bolt that I'm working on is inclined steeply from vertical so that any metal chips will tend to fall away from any openings into the engine. No so with the bolts on the front of the cylinder.
    I wouldn't do anything that would jeopardize the longevity or mechanical integrity of the 990 engine
    #49
  10. D.T.

    D.T. Difficult but useful

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    Haven't got it out yet?? What is the torque spec of that bolt?
    #50
  11. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    yes a hammer and chisel will be enough. you may have to wack it a few times. you have so much more force applied with the hammer and chisel method. you may want to use a flat ended punch first directly on the head to shock the threads free. i really should make a video of this method, i use it 99% of the time when i'm splitting cases on vintage motors.. - i can't believe i couldn't find a good one on youtube. here's one (although not a very good shot) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ci7l_Ir5gso countersunk screws are by far the hardest to get out..
    #51
  12. D.T.

    D.T. Difficult but useful

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    #52
  13. Smoke Eater 3

    Smoke Eater 3 Been here awhile

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    Screw pliers are life savers. I've used them on more than one occasion.
    #53
  14. dmn0507

    dmn0507 Been here awhile

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    BTDT, in a friend's engine one of those bolts was so damn tight i've almost bent a wrench to remove it.
    I had luck with a good quality allen insert, the fit was really tight so i wasn't afraid to apply torque.

    I would hit it with a punch in the center, but I don't remember how beefy is the head there.
    Instead of dropping the engine completely, if you swing it down you should have enough room to grab the bolt with a vicegrip, but still some stuff needs to be removed.
    #54
  15. Hootowl

    Hootowl Long timer

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    Tried it today. No workie.
    The chisel just pealed away part of the cap. The bolt didn't budge.
    I thought these bolts were hardened steel? Didn't act like they were.
    #55
  16. Benesesso

    Benesesso Long timer

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    Try reading post #44. :doh
    #56
  17. Hootowl

    Hootowl Long timer

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    Right. the next step.
    #57
  18. stainlesscycle

    stainlesscycle Long timer

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    dull chisel or flat punch for turning it then. or slot was not cut deep enough.
    #58
  19. griffo1962

    griffo1962 Long timer

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    I find a centre punch works really well.....
    #59
  20. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Seems like it may be time to drop the engine. If you'd done that at first this would be a done deal. Sometimes what seems to be the hard way isn't in the long run.
    #60