Solo Chick livin' a Dream: North Rim Grand Canyon loop Via Sedona

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by nicomama, Oct 22, 2009.

  1. nicomama

    nicomama Rugged Rider

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    Now, for the deets on my windscreen setup. I did a lot of research looking for all the cool ones out there. As you DRZ owners know, there isn't one made especially for the DRZ. So, it's up to us to modify what we can find. I knew I didn't need a tall one, so I checked into the flyscreens, which are tiny windscreens to keep the flies off your face. Ha.

    Wouldn't you know it. The only ones I liked were in England. It was worth it to me to pay for the shipping. Paid $119.95 for the Dart flyscreen that fits the Triumph Scrambler. The brackets that come with it have a good amount of play in them, because of the rubber grommets. All I had to do to fit it to my 8" headlight frame was buy a $2.99 mending brace at the local hardware store and have that cut into two 4" pieces with holes already in it...

    [​IMG]

    Then I just spray painted my custom brackets black and bolted that baby right onto my headlight frame. I loved this setup on the road and in the wind. Saved my neck.

    Finished product. See the black angled bracket with the hex bolts? That's my cheap solution...
    [​IMG]


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  2. sab

    sab Been here awhile

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    Fun report! I have the same pillow from REI and found I prefer the Thermarest version. I think it compacts a little more, but is much more pillow-like when expanded. It's foam filled. Decadence but worth it. :)
  3. NSFW

    NSFW ktm's "the tourist"

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    :clap love the rr and pics.

    thanks.........:thumb
  4. Jonzilla

    Jonzilla Adventurer

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    A huge factor in perceived tenderness of jerky is the direction the pieces are cut in relation to the grain of the meat. You may know, but if the meat is cut perpendicular to the grain then the pieces will practically fall apart in your mouth. Even the toughest cuts of round will be not too bad when cut this way. Oh the things I learned during my one year run at a slaughterhouse.

    Thanks for the great ride report! It's interesting how much quicker solo reports flow. For obvious reasons of course. Solo is the way to go!
  5. sam1905

    sam1905 Been here awhile

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    Great ride and report - thanks!

    I always laugh when I read these because all us ADV'ers are the same. Its just not a trip until you have some kind of packing list (or in my and many cases a color coded spreadsheet) and a picture of everything laid out neatly! :)

    Attached Files:

  6. rockydog

    rockydog just a guy

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    I had just purchased a cr or cb500 honda(guzzi looking thang) from a friend who couldn't ride because of bleeding hemmoroids(sp), cheap cheap price and named the bike appropriately. i was living in the bay area, ca. and an old girlfriend called me from new york saying i'd really like to see you. 3 hours later, after 'borrowing' a set of cheap canvas saddle bags from a bike in front of the irish bar i hung out at, after I swung by the bezerrkley Rei for a stove, tent, sleeping bag, pad, cook kit i was on the way. fueled by irish coffees, wearing my hein gericke leathers and hitting only two lane roads and two bit towns through montana, canada, etc wherever the locals told me were the best roads . this was when spread sheets pertained to beds
    and if you couldn't wear what you carried, it didn't get carried. but times change, i have lists, bins with bike junk, and the same redhead just called. from new york. Saying I'd really like to see you. maybe the southern route?
  7. hahmule

    hahmule Balding Gloriously

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    Cool Ride! Great views! The postmortem was interesting too. Thanks for the info on the Dart wind screen. You came up with a much easier solution than some of my buds and I have been contemplating. I think it will work perfectly on my 610. :thumb
  8. Pantah

    Pantah Red Sox Nation

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    Wow - You are into it! Thanks for your RR and looking forward to your review of what worked and didn't.

    I've done a fair amount of long distance motorcycle camping, including the Canyon country you passed through. I have more storage on my large KTM, but I probably carry even less then you did on this trip. Generally a couple sets of wicking poly clothes and only 3 days of underwear. I can wash at a camp and they are pretty dry in the morning. One pair of sandals and a pair casual slipons. Ball cap too. Of course my ride wear and gerbings liner.

    My luxury is also an REI crush pillow and a camp chair. I carry a laptop and enough tools and spares to make roadside repairs. I use a Big Agnes air mattress because its very comfy and packs the size of a paperback novel. My headlamp, Jetboil and plastic rain slicker are also important. My tent/groundcloth/bag combo is similar to yours. I generally eat in restaurants late morning and late afternoon. I carry emergency food, but I rarely cook anything in camp other then boiling water for coffee or tea.

    You rode right past Tuzigoot Anasazi ancient ruins just north of Jerome! It is an ancient settlement similar to the cliffhouses in NM. Too bad you missed that. Also, you could have ridden Toroweap easy enough. The road would have been a cinch on that DRZ. Only maybe 70 miles from the highway. Campground is dry, but really nice.

    I love your bike set-up and rack! I wish KTM offered something like that. Looking forward to your wrap-up.
  9. chain

    chain Long timer

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    Great Trip:clap :clap
  10. nicomama

    nicomama Rugged Rider

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    So, now it's time to check in and see how the ol' bod held up on this 1,533 mile trek. Other than the minimal bruises from throwing the bike and load around, I have to say that one biggie health issue caught my attention.

    I got tendonitis from throttling a few hours daily for a week...

    [​IMG]

    I think somehow the tendonitis is in my right elbow and is pinching off my ulnar nerve, because I have lost the strength in my grip and can't straighten my fingers all the way. I can't tie shoes or turn the key in my car ignition. It was hard to be self sufficient towards the end of the trip, but I just barreled through it and used my left hand for gripping things.

    Isn't this crazy?! Has anyone else out there had this problem on distance rides?

    Unfortunately, I think I have to lay off riding until this heals. Oh well, I have to wait for my 602 flashers to be shipped from Wheeling Cycle Supply anyway.
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  11. stickman1432

    stickman1432 Crusty Adventurer

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    Your write up was great............as for the tendious try a Crampbuster for the throttle http://www.crampbuster.com/ and maybe go to locking throttle on the end of the bar. This is a friction devise and works great since you can tighten or loosen it to your own requirements ( http://www.kaoko.com/cruisecontrol.html ). I have both on the GS and they worked great on the Alaska 10,000 miler this last summer. The cheapest way is the crampbuster and you just palm the throttle and don't always have to have that firm grip on the road.

    I really like your back rack on the DR, do you have anything in the making for a XR650R? :thumb :ricky
  12. WaywardSon

    WaywardSon Long timer

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    Nice write up and pics! I was through most of the same area a couple of weeks ago...beautiful country. It was difficult to make any time though, having to stop constantly for another pic:-)

    Thanks for taking the time...nice job.
  13. Thumpercrazee

    Thumpercrazee Long timer

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    Great report and photo display! Thanks for sharing your trip with us.

    TC:D
  14. rockjohn

    rockjohn Been here awhile

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    :thumb Great RR, Your organized for sure. I catch a lot of shit from my riding partners because I stress over having the right gear for the current ride, until they screw the pouch and need something I have. As for the tendinitis I use a cheap ($15.00) throttle rocker its easy on and off when you don't need it (never off road). I'm sure by now you have seen a doc, I had this problem last year and had to ice my elbows every night for months. My elbow pain was from the gym :lift not my bars, just a thought a new bend might help. Hope you heel soon, thanks for sharing your adventure. :jose
  15. bg

    bg Rainbow puppies Super Moderator

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    Awesome report. I especially appreciated seeing your pack list, the details of your set up and what worked/didn't.

    I also loved your pictures, especially Joshua Tree. I've been riding there but it's been a couple of years and it was fun to see through your eyes. I can't wait to get back.
  16. rodr

    rodr Been here awhile

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    Sorry to hear about the tendonitis. For what it's worth, on my Weestrom I installed a Grip Puppy on the throttle side only. This allows a lighter grip, and in fact I mostly ride with only my ring and pinky fingers around the throttle, and the other two fingers resting on top of the brake lever. This helps to feel more in control of throttle and braking, and I don't have any trouble with cramping or pain.

    I used to have a throttle rocker, but couldn't get used to it and took it off.
  17. rckt grl

    rckt grl Sportbike Addict

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    Minnesota
    As others have said, great ride report! Pics are awesome, as is your writing... thanks for taking us on your journey. I have yet to see the Grand Canyon and I will tell you that your pics brought a tear to my eye and I can only imagine how I will feel when I get to see it personally. I'm hoping to do so in 2010.

    Peace
    -Denyse
  18. Dirtdigger

    Dirtdigger Adventurer

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    Finland, Europe
    Nice ride and good report! I really enjoyd the photos!
    Grand Canyon has always been a place that id like to visit some day, so it was nice to "live" it through youre report!
  19. RicH2

    RicH2 Ric H2

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    A lot of folks simply don't realize they're griping the bars way to hard. The suggestions here for throttle assist/control are great. But, you might want to practice relaxing your arms and hands to train yourself not to have a death grip on the bars. Relaxed arms are best for control of the bike anyway.

    Great RR BTW....
  20. JBSmith

    JBSmith Ink-stained wretch

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    Something I've noticed--the type of glove I wear can make a difference to my throttle hand. Some gloves have liners that aren't sewn in at enough seams, and shift around inside the leather outer, sort of like a glove within a glove. I find myself gripping tighter with gloves like this to maintain good throttle control. Also, some gloves are made of a material that doesn't provide a lot of friction on the grip, also leading to holding on tighter. My favorite gloves are unlined deerskin. I can ride all day in these, but when it gets cold, and I put on my thicker winter gloves, I almost always get right shoulder pain from holding the grip too tightly.