Some questions on a Europe trip, and motorcycle shipping...

Discussion in 'EMEA' started by cialowicz, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    True. Route planning consists of sitting in a restaurant, tasting the wine list. The best domaine gets to be the recipient of a visit.
    Look at the map, and plot the most sinuous route. Add some gratuitous cols and gorges.
    The Luberon is not the Alps, often quite a bit less than 1000m, but plenty squiggly and with elevation changes to match. Of course if you want a higher altitude fix, then try Mont Ventoux, but take your warm clothes.
    The excellent Col de Murs on the D4 is only 640m, there are lots of alternate routes to places, so even if I have been to somewhere before, I can usually make a different route.
    Mostly gnarly single carridgeway, narrow with crap surfaces. Almost traffic free, beautiful views with an olfactory back ground of garrigue and hot aromatic herbs. Plus the interesting villages and towns. With little cafes, bars and occasionally a restaurant. Win!

    Spent years doing the 4\5000 miles in a fortnight thing. Great fun and really enjoyed it then. Now many of the roads I enjoyed in the south back then are clogged with tourist buses and campervans, many of them rentals, so the drivers really have no idea.
    robxxx and wheatwhacker like this.
  2. GvG

    GvG Been here awhile

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    When I went at the end of April/beginning of May 3 years ago, the roads in the Luberon and Verdon were mostly empty.

    I should do that again. It was awesome.
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  3. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    After years of high summer while working when it was our southern node, then September into October.
    A couple of Easter visits, but it was still too cool, we visited in late May into June. What a transformation! GREEN! Poppies and other wild flowers thick and dense. The cherry trees ablaze with ripe fruit, like fields of huge candles.
    We stumbled on the cherry festival at Casenove. A great day out in a village half ruined, but enough people from the commune to put on a show. A farmer had brought out his cherry picking tractor, an interesting attachment. A whole lot of shaking going on.
    A burger stall where you had to order, get a ticket and wait, because each was made individually. Frites sold separately.
    They also had a larger beer and wine stall, so the waiting wasn't too hard.
  4. robxxx

    robxxx Adventurer

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    I still do this now, and still loving it as well. I think a psychologist might read somthing into the fact that I need to get as fast, and as far, as I can from the UK during my limited time. Sad really.
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  5. lhendrik

    lhendrik Putins Puppet

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    This is a great read. I recall my first (and not last) drop of my overloaded R1200GSA was 5 years ago on a road "mined" with cow patties. Came around a gentle curve on a narrow French country road, moving real slow just ambling along, saw the cow poop, slowed even more and stupidly ran over on immense turd, and over she went at 10mph. No traffic. Picked up the beast with adrenaline boosted super-power before anyone could come along and laugh at me. Left the little crash bar scar to remind me to avoid that particular hazard.
  6. NumberCruncher

    NumberCruncher Been here awhile

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    Every road I have EVER been on is worth seeing both coming and going. Some more than once. The road from White Pass down to the tourist spoiled town of Skagway comes to mind. Learned a lot in this thread despite some of the name calling.

    1) Agree that taking MY bike for the experience is worth quite a bit of $$ over just using someone else's bike. This is one of those you agree or don't agree and there is no in-between.

    2) Which bike/engine size to take? Completely personal in nature. For sporty riding I like a bike with good torque down low but a very progressive power band for sporty riding that encourages me to keep the revs up. On a 1,000cc Japanese inline 4 or 1,200cc Italian twin I get so much performance that I cannot use it all and have less fun that on a mid-size sport bike. I follow the mantra it is more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow. But for touring I want the torque of a larger engine. I know one of the guys here was really down on the 1200 boxer BMW. That would be one of my two choices, the other a Multistrada. My only gripe with the boxer is I can't really stretch my legs out with the cylinder heads in the way. That actually got me to sell my R1200GS but I don't know what I'll replace it with. And if that bike doesn't have enough torque at 3,000 rpm try an single cylinder bike.

    3) The advice I'd give to ANYONE planning ANY trip is as follows: The bike, exact route, specific trip (Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa, North-Central-South America) will be much more enjoyable if you actually put a date on the calendar for when you are GOING to leave and MAKE IT HAPPEN! It is fun to be inspired by others but if you don't start planning now, it will never happen.
  7. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    I tend to agree. One major exception is if you want a good long test ride on a bike that you're looking at (assuming that it's available for rental).

    I rode one of these in northern Italy in the mid '70s ($1,200 new in '75):

    [​IMG]

    and have one of these in my garage:

    [​IMG]

    GOBS of fun being able to ride a bike close to its potential. Like fishing with light tackle - it's all finesse.

    I've rented GSes for 6 years in the Alps. LOVE the bike. When it came time to replace my trusty VStrom (wanted shaft drive and a bigger alternator), the GS was the obvious choice.

    Then I test rode a Tiger Explorer. Started signing papers when I got back. 30K miles later and absolutely no regrets. Absolute silly HP and torque like a mesa top. The GSes made me smile while riding them. The TEx makes me giggle.

    [​IMG]
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  8. Bill 310

    Bill 310 Poser Emeritus

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    Today's New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/04/...lights&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=sectionfront

    Mercedes-Benz Museum, Mercedesstraße 100, 70372 Stuttgart. mercedes-benz.com/en/mercedes-benz/classic/museum/

    Tuesday to Sunday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

    Adults: 10 euros, or $12. Children 15 to 17: 5 euros. Children up to 14: Free.

    Porsche Museum, Porscheplatz 1 70435 Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen. porsche.com/museum/en/

    Tuesday to Sunday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

    Adults: 8 euros. Children up to 14, accompanied by an adult: Free.

    The museums offer a 25 percent discount if you present a ticket from the other museum.

    Porsche factory tours start at the museum; the factory is across the street. Available Monday to Friday. Advance reservations are a must. They can be made at factorytours@porsche.de

    Adults and children (must be at least 12 years old): 6 euros.

    Italy

    Museo Enzo Ferrari, Via Paolo Ferrari, 85, 41121 Modena musei.ferrari.com/en/modena

    Museo Ferrari Maranello, Via Alfredo Dino Ferrari, 43, 41053 Maranello musei.ferrari.com/en/maranello

    Tickets for adults are 16 euros for each museum or 26 euros for a combined ticket.

    Museo Lamborghini, Via Modena, 12 40019 Sant’Agata lamborghini.com/en-en/experience/museum

    Tickets for adults are 15 euro

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/04/...lights&contentPlacement=2&pgtype=sectionfront
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  9. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    ^^^^^ I have asked for similar information to be made a sticky. No luck yet. There are a huge number of places similar to Bill 310's posting above.
    Not only save those of us from repeatedly typing them up, or worse getting fed up doing ditto.
    May also help visitors plan a better route and justify not having to ride like a demon while passing by sites worth a detour.

    De. The Ladenberg Carl Benz Museum. Sinnsheim Technical Museum. These two probably represent the two ends of the spectrum, museum wise. Both worth the effort. The Neckarsulm NSU Bike Museum. The Audi thing at Ingolstadt. Ditto the BMW place in Munich. Berlin Technical Museum.
    uk. Duxford - part of the IWM (and the IWM itself in London) near Cambridge with lots of US planes displayed in a dedicated hanger (and the not too far away American Military Cemetery). National Motorcycle Museum on the outskirts of Birmingham. National Railway Museum in York.
    Fr. The French National Motor Museum (previously the Schlumph Museum) and nearby French National Rail Museum. And on and on.

    There are also many small, personal collections open that people stumble across fairly randomly.
  10. Bill 310

    Bill 310 Poser Emeritus

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    I wrote the mod just now

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  11. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Good on you. If more people do it they may recognise the need/benefit.

    Hope you get a better response than me - "we have a robust search function"...
  12. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    I FINALLY hit the Sinsheim Technik Museum in July. Checked into a local hotel for 2 nights so to be able to spend the day there. No regrets. To add a bit of icing to the cake, it was the start point for a classic car rally which was just forming up when I got there. Some pics here.

    And the NSU Museum in Neckarsulm is a jewel. Some pics here.
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  13. NumberCruncher

    NumberCruncher Been here awhile

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    Key West. Fantastic. Ironically I bought my 1200GS in Sarasota and rode out to Key West then back to Washington State. The only pictures I have of that marker have me in them. I won't post that and scare the hell out of anyone here . . . :)

    Glad you like your Tiger. I don't know what I'll buy for my next long distance touring bike but I'll give that Tiger a look see.

    NC

  14. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    Precisely why I stand behind the camera. :D
  15. marty hill

    marty hill The Energizer Bunny

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    $150 was for dangerous goods doc. What a crock! Tied to s pallet/8th time, always safe. Panniers were packed full and on the bike. All I carried on the plane was my helmet and 1 days fresh clothes just in case. On the flight back to YUL I heard a page asking the bike owner to come fwd. I did, and the captain, who rides came out and spent about 20 minutes with me. He had no idea they carried bikes till he saw mine being loaded. He will now ship his bike to Europe rather than renting while there. Since I hold a commercial pilots license he invited me into the office after all the px's had departed. Fun!
    slowriding likes this.