Speeding and parking tickets in Europe

Discussion in 'Europe' started by motion, May 2, 2017.

  1. Johann

    Johann commuterus tankslapperus

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    In Portugal when approaching a 50km/h limt they have a very civilised system. There is a marker for 70km/h limit first then about 100m further on is a marker for 50km/h at the entrance to villages/towns/built up areas next to the road etc. If your speed is above the limit there is a set of lights shortly after the 50km/h marker which will turn red for about 20 seconds. This gives you time to think about how naughty you have been and then the lights turn green again and you can ride away suitably chastened. It really is a great country.
    #21
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  2. bozo92

    bozo92 Adventurer

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    In France they can shoot you front and/or rear, mobile or fixed devices.
    I've had troubles with the noise of an homologated exhaust, even being CE marked.... Too Noisy, period, 5 days to come back with the right one.
    And parking the bike in Parisis getting more difficult, I'm getting more and more 35€ tickets, even taking care to park the bike out of pedestrian access, nor bothering any one. They need money :hmmmmm
    #22
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  3. StartAdventures

    StartAdventures riders on the storm

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    I don't agree with this i have been riding in Ukraina 3 times, Russia 4 times crossing from Ukraina to kazakhistan , the all central Asia, Georgia and Azerbaijan and again the all Russia from Sakhalin island back to Europe and not even 1 bribe on the road. Never !!! They stop me ask for documents, where I'm from , where I'm going and how fast is the bike. Make a photo and goodbye. The only bribe asked was in Takijistan on the border ...i had to wait 3 hours to make it half.

    I actually live in Russia already over 2 years and they stop U just if u don't follow the rules or just to check if everything is fine with docs.

    In Italy as I'm Italian, speed cameras are normally made to see also motorcycles plates. The only motorcycle parking fine i got was in the airport wich the municipality had to make it as I park a bit on the way. I got speed tickets ....but now with application on the smarphone u can know where they are (box camera they stationary ) .... if u check the police website they write the day before where they gonna put the "moving" cameras . Municipality police are the worse they are just there to wait someone for speeding or doing something to make a fine.
    However if you where not flying i think u can speak nice and they will let u go as you as foreigner rappresent a problem for them.

    I just don't advise to brake rules in swiss/austria and germany. They are not tender those guys.

    However i did all local back roads in the all Europe (not just Scandinavian) and to say the true i did not see police at all.

    Reduce the speed and enjoy panoramas ;)
    #23
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  4. motion

    motion Been here awhile

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    A couple questions for those of you with Italy knowledge...

    I bought a tire at a tire shop in Italy, and the sales guy wanted my "book". I don't have a book. He was pretty incredulous. He said there would be big trouble if I were to be stopped by the police. Any idea what that is and if I should have something on me?

    I went on the Autostrada one damn time and blew it. I entered a Telepass lane and was confronted with a red light. Couldn't back up, of course. I blew the red light. Drove for about 30 kms and exited in a Telepass lane with a motorcycle lane to the right of the arm. I went onto the Telepass website, but don't see a way to enter my plate number and the date to pay online. Any ideas on what I should do?
    #24
  5. itinerant wool stash

    itinerant wool stash Adventurer

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    They almost certainly mean the vehicle registration papers (not the title, that should stay somewhere safe; as in the US, physical possession of the title creates a supposition of ownership) that were issued together with the license plate. Unlike the title you're supposed to carry them with you every time you ride.

    Regarding your Telepass: If you get in that situation what you're supposed to do is to hit the help button (if there is no English label look for "Richiesta di Intervento" or "Assistenza"); this will connect you to their support, and they can remotely issue you a payment slip you can use to pay at the next tool booth. Or failing that, just stop at the next toll booth.

    Since you didn't do either for that the Italians are liable to come after the bike's registration holder, because from their perspective that is quite indistinguishable from trying to skip the tolls on purpose, and hence they're liable to see it as such.

    If you're still in Italy, the best option probably would be to hit one of their service stations (go to google maps, search for "Punto Blu") in person during business hours (mo-fri, 09:00-17:00); failing that, try to get in contact with Autostrada per l'Italia: http://www.autostrade.it/en/rmpp/
    #25
  6. motion

    motion Been here awhile

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    Thanks. I will try contacting them via the website or email address.

    I did show the tire guy my registration, but he was looking for some sort of motorcycle information book that would show the manufacturer specified tire size, tire speed ratings, etc.
    #26
  7. khpossum

    khpossum poster

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    I just spend another month in Europe, this time in a rental car. Mostly in Spain and Portugal, but also France, Belgium and Holland. I would be shocked if I don't receive at least one speeding ticket thru Avis. The way they change speed limits, sometime multiple times in less then a quarter mile and the illogical / unpredictable limits it is next to impossible not to exceed the speed limits multiple times a day. I tried very hard and generally drove at the speed limits, I was in no hurry.

    I downloaded the Garmin POI for speed cameras / traps. You can get a free trial for a month, which worked for me. It is far from fool proof, but it helps.

    This is my solution: I also have a bike parked in Holland for the last 8 years that I use once a year for a trip for 1 or 2 months going as far as Uzbekistan. I have never received ticket with it, because it still has my Colorado plates on it. That has worked like a charm it appears. Fortunately "live" speed checks with cops and radar guns are a rarity, speed cameras are how countries in Europe collect their speed tax. Low overhead and easy money.
    #27
  8. Dieselpwr

    Dieselpwr Been here awhile

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    seems the Waze app is becoming popular in Europe as well. Not sure how well it works over there since Waze is useless without alot of user's input.
    #28
  9. ThorH

    ThorH BMW R1200GS

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    Location:
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    Norway:
    Parking on the pavement gets you a €100 ticket. Larger cities will have designated free MC-parking, else you have to park (and pay) as a car. Many parking garages will let you park for free, as long as you can pass the gate and do not take up a car space. Some let two bikes share a car space (and the bill). Others ask for full car price. Oslo is banning all street parking in the center these days, so we are loosing a lot of the bike spaces now.

    Speeding:
    Speed cameras (point and distance), but from front only. Do not even register bikes.

    The main roads (E6, E18, etc) are mainly supervised by (unmarked) cars and bikes. They especially love dark VW Passat estates, but also use VW Transporters, BMW, Mercedes and Volvo. The bikes are mainly BMW K1300S, I think. These guys will generally leave you be as long as you are not more than 20% above the posted limit or very aggressive. Sometimes they may follow you for a while to see if you are the stupid kind, and then just flash the blue light to tell you they are watching and that you need to slow down. They are really out looking for the dangerous ones.

    Ride normally, and the laser speed traps are what you need to worry about. They are usually in built up areas on heavily trafficked secondary roads. Here they do not care about anything but the number, and there is no leeway. Sometimes, you may think the location is chosen to make the most money, rather than from a safety perspective. Anyway, it quickly gets expensive here.

    It is OK to filter between the cars. If there are three lanes in one direction, you filter in the left gap. You are not allowed to pass on the right shoulder.

    Two-wheeled bikes are allowed to use the bus/taxi lanes, but not trikes or side hacks.

    For most ferries (there are a couple of bike hating captains out there) it is ok to ride up to the front of the line. Ask if you are a big group.

    There are lots of toll roads in Norway, but bikes are generally free. There are however obnoxious tolls to be paid on some private roads, e.g. up to Dalsnibba (http://www.dalsnibba.no/en/ NOK 130,- for bike or car!!!) and on Tindevegen (https://www.en.tindevegen.no NOK 80,- for bike or car). You will also be asked to pay on many private mountain roads.
    #29
  10. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    I've had a US registered bike in the EU since 2009. I know for a fact that I've had my picture taken a few times (the usual bit is not seeing a speed limit change until - oops)

    I've never received anything in the mail. My assumption (LOVE that word) is that if you have a non-EU plate, you just don't show up in their system.

    Switzerland is probably the worst - low limits and high enforcement. Pay at the roadside, and they take Visa. OTOH, they have superb roads and gorgeous scenery.

    Note: In addition to making you virtually invisible to photo RADAR, the US plates are one hell of a conversation starter.
    #30
  11. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Quite a few European countries have on-the-spot fines. As in Pay Now, before you move. Probably no way to avoid these, other than obey the signs.

    The other high risk area for aliens is if they are renting. The rental company will have your credit card details, and will be mostly obliged to divulged them to the forces of law and order.
    I have heard (over the internet, ha!) that the rental place gets the fine which they add to your card charges. Again, I have no need to ever rent a bike, so all this is hersay.

    I have been flashed both on the bike - which people claim are immune because the plate is the wrong end - and in the car, so far I have never received any communication about any penalty.
    Schengen means I currently don't have to be concerned about any remote possibility that a ticket will be lodged for me to be picked up leaving an EU country.

    I don't know how it works or locations are chosen, except in the UK.
    When they first became widespread, there was enough of a rumpus that strict guidelines were enforced. Camera box must be hi viz and visable ie not behind another sign, obstacle or vegetation. Only sites of repeated serious incidents\death could be used. Prior warning signs must be shown, and maybe a few more.
    All camera sites are on all the gps mapping, but the box is most likely not have a camera. My adjacent county of Cambridge has 53 approved sites, but only 3 cameras. Obviously deterrence works in rural areas.
    Mobile units can be anywhere - they are run by the police and if you are unlucky, they can prosecute you for being over the limit, no allowance, no leeway - 30mph limit means 30mph, no speedo error or allance for conditions. Usually though, there is some wiggle room.
    For aliens, as there are no on-the-spot fines here, you can just bugger off after your holiday, leaving us having to put up with the rabid right press shouting about all the foreigners abusing "our" hospitality.

    For Brits and people registered and living here, a nice refinement is the Average Speed camera. Which does what it says, measures your average speed over a considerable distance, as in miles. Get it wrong, and you get it in the post. At least my car has cruise control, the bike not so much, but I rarely use those type of roads for pleasure anyway.
    #31
  12. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    2007 - I was playing tour Guide for an old friend and his daughter - rental bikes from an agency in Oberentfelden, Switzerland. We were heading back to Andermatt from the Praegel pass when it started to rain. We decided to take the Autobahn rather the slow road through the towns. Julie had lagged somewhat behind us, and somewhere around Erstfeld she decided to catch up and in the process rode in excess of the generous 80 kph limit on the Autobahn - somewhere around 100 kph, if memory serves. A month or two later a request for $300+ dollars came in from the rental agency.

    Not quite hearsay, but well documented.
    #32
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  13. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Good to know (in the way that knowledge is good - not so much for your friends daughter). Hopefully help oveseas folks on a rental realise they are not immune.
    #33
  14. glitch_oz

    glitch_oz Long timer

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    ...and in today's age, that request is transmitted to the registered owner of the vehicle within 2 days.
    They're fully integrated systems, the software transmits the offence to the fine-issuing authority automatically, simultaneously with a docking notice to your demerit-point account if you're a local, and the notice is in the mail within a few hours.
    3 day rental...speed-ticket 18kmh over...fine present at time of return to base...amount was deducted from the security-deposit refund.
    #34
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  15. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    It used to be said the wheels of justice rolled exceeding slow, but exceeding fine. Now they have the speed thing nailed too.
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  16. glitch_oz

    glitch_oz Long timer

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    You bet your arse!
    Screw the public purse for however far it might possibly stretch!! :-)

    The Austrians are worse...the local "track-marshals" can judge-by-dead-reckoning and fine you on the spot !
    #36
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  17. MichaelJ

    MichaelJ Long timer

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    The Wheels of Justice still roll exceedingly slow.

    The revenue-generating wheels however...
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  18. Frank59

    Frank59 Adventurer

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    lucky Brits. In Merkel-Country authorities found a new business model: speed cameras are installed and maintained by private "service" companies. The companies and administration share the profit generated from the traps. As the purpose of private companies is to make money, the traps are placed where they generate as much profit as possible. You pracitally never find traps in front of schools or hospitals :)

    Germany was not the original question but could interest somebody else: speed trap coverage highly differs between regions, eg. regions with high coverage:
    Region Aix la Chapelle - Nurburgring: in the 90th we had what I called the "route des radars". Nowadays camouflage police bikes ride around the whole day waiting for bikers they can follow to see if the latter commit an infraction (we once did a day trip and were followed by one of those police bikes).
    Region south of Frankfurt: entirely covered with speed traps (with video analysis) during the last years, 1-3 traps each village, traps between villages, traps on high speed roads , traps on small country roads, mobile traps at sunny days... it's up to a point that motorcycle tourism has nearly vanished. When I go out on a ride here I encounter 10 - 20 traps within 3 hours. When I go riding in France I encounter 1-2 traps in one week.
    Regions with little to no coverage : alpine region, Pfalz, Hunsrueck, Spessart Rhoen, eastern Laender, bavarian forest etc.
    #38
  19. Herman1

    Herman1 Been here awhile

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    We were in Austria last week and the speed trap was conveniently situated at the bottom of a hill in a car park which had a bank and ATM in it. However that said slow down for built up areas and you wont have a problem generally in Europe and beyond. Pay attention if on coming motorists are flashing or waving at you.
    #39
  20. glitch_oz

    glitch_oz Long timer

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    Merkel +Co stole that one from the Aussies, we've had Private Contractors for near on a decade.
    It sure pays handsomely, as the legislative ensures permanency of the system by dropping speed-limits continuously and randomly.
    Schools, hospitals etc have proven the fallback turnover-guarantor as they are designated slow-zones...but only during certain times of the day.
    And their clock is always right :-)
    #40