Splicing Wires

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by trscott, Nov 4, 2007.

  1. Rampage1967

    Rampage1967 Been here awhile

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    #81
  2. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    :nod Way better to use positaps.

    Jim :brow
    #82
  3. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    That's true for the red yellow blue insulated crap you get at Harbor Freight and various other places. Same goes for the simple plier type crimpers.

    Proper terminals crimped with the correct ratchet type crimpers are just as good as solder. The wire will break before it pulls out. Crimped connections are used on virtually all modern commercial aircraft.
    #83
  4. t6pilot

    t6pilot Been here awhile

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    Forgot to add use quality wire, auto parts/ hardware wire isn't really all that good
    I bought a couple spools of different size aircraft wire, use it on bikes, cars and even airplanes.
    #84
  5. eric1514

    eric1514 (R)

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    One other trick. After you've soldered the wires together but before you shrink the tubing, put a small dab of silicone sealer on the connection and then slip the tubing on. When the tubing shrinks down and the silicone cures, that connection is absolutely waterproof.

    Eric
    #85
  6. Dolly Sod

    Dolly Sod Red Clay Halo

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    Where is a place to get good quality wire online? It's really hard to gauge (pardon the pun) quality while shopping online.
    #86
  7. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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    lay the double wires flat against eachother and continue as before. get the heat shrink with hot glue coating on the inside (or put a small piece of glue stick inside the heatshrink) and as the heat shrink does its thing it squeezes glue through the whole joint and seals the gap between the two wires. you end up with the same joint but with two wires coming out one end
    #87
  8. chasbmw

    chasbmw Long timer

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    The small butane fueled soldering irons work very well and can put out enough heat to solder quite large wires. Really useful if you don't have power in your garage.
    #88
  9. tundradirtbiker

    tundradirtbiker Been here awhile

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    MCM electronics.

    NTE wire, all colors, gauges and lengths. If you order a back ordered item, they ship it when available. Shipping in the $8 range for small orders.

    http://www.mcmelectronics.com/search.aspx?C=0000001536
    #89
  10. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Anatomically Correct

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    crap -- 40 years of non-professional wiring behind me and NOW this piece of advice comes to light.

    thanks!
    #90
  11. engineman

    engineman Been here awhile

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    Where to I find the heat shrink tubing with the glue in it? I've never seen it before. I've been trying to find a good tap splice method for years

    Sent from my SCH-R530U using Tapatalk
    #91
  12. troidus

    troidus Long timer

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    #92
  13. IDRIDR

    IDRIDR Take me to the River

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    Check Harbor Freight and look for the marine grade stuff. Of course from HF it can't be the best, but I've been very happy with it so far. Sticks well to the wire sheathing and oozes out the ends just a little bit. I get little boxes with a variety of diameters in about four inch lengths for a few bucks.

    google fu: http://www.harborfreight.com/42-piece-marine-heat-shrink-tubing-67598.html
    #93
  14. upshiftst4s

    upshiftst4s "stud" machinist

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    Sorry for the hijack, I am thinking this subject pertains.
    I used black silicone sealant on 2 temperature sensor wires I solder spliced an additional switch on them. I smeared the silicone on after soldering and cleaning with water (water soluable flux), and before the silicone set I wrapped with electrical tape.
    I am wondering if the black silicone might be conductive enough to foul (short) or be a high resistance with the temperature sensor signal to the fuel injection ECU and cause a engine stumble?
    #94
  15. hpsVFR

    hpsVFR Hoosier Daddy

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    You spliced a switch between a temperature sensor and the ECU? Dare I ask why?

    As for the silicone, it's generally an insulator, and a good one. You could test for continuity easily enough by simply placing the probes of a DMM on a lump of the stuff and checking for continuity, or by probing the wires you gooped up to see if your meter can detect the sensor signal through the goop.

    Just off the cuff though, I doubt it's the silicone that's at issue here. YMMV, of course; there's not nearly enough information to provide a firm opinion.
    #95
  16. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Yep, I've been using this trick for years, though I usually lay the glue down with a hot melt glue gun , wait until it's cold, push the heat-shrink over and hit that with the heat. You get a gas tight seal, which means no corrosion, and the glue does a LOT towards stabilizing the joint against vibration.

    Pete
    #96
  17. ttpete

    ttpete Rectum Non Bustibus

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    Make sure you don't use RTV that smells like vinegar. That variety contains acetic acid and will cause corrosion.
    #97
  18. upshiftst4s

    upshiftst4s "stud" machinist

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    I put a switch to short the sensor to turn on the cooling fan. Was a previously posted information on Ducati.MS about 10 years ago. I since removed the switch from the sensor and fused and switch supplied direct battery power to the fan for city riding. Was just wondering about any conducting by black silicone across a low Mv signal wire set.
    #98
  19. hpsVFR

    hpsVFR Hoosier Daddy

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    Plain silicones are unlikely to conduct anything. Do you suspect this sensor specifically?
    #99
  20. upshiftst4s

    upshiftst4s "stud" machinist

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    No, I swapped sensors, since identical PN's. Was working a diagnosis for stumble at 3000 RPM on Ducati EFI. My next step is to see if I connected a farkle power from fuse that supplies EFI, install a separate fuse panel.