Sprockets - what is the 'life duty cycle'?

Discussion in 'Crazy-Awesome almost Dakar racers (950/990cc)' started by BOB RAMSAY, Apr 28, 2012.

  1. TcRulz

    TcRulz Been here awhile

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    +1. Lube that doesn't dry just picks up the dust and dirt and becomes grinding paste. Actually causes the rollers to wear faster:eek1.
    #21
  2. mousitsas

    mousitsas Long timer

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    Some interesting thoughts on non-lubing the chain! I think I have started buying into the theory!
    #22
  3. spencergt66

    spencergt66 Been here awhile

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    Buy a scottoiler best thing I ever did chain is always perfectly oiled and people are going 30k miles before replacing the drive components
    #23
  4. DetR6oit

    DetR6oit Been here awhile

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    I have tried both ways. With little to no lubing, my last DID X ring lasted only a little over 10k miles. That was with new sprockets at the same time. With lubing constantly I got much closer to 20k miles with the stock chain. So in my experience no lube cut my chain life nearly in half.
    #24
  5. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Well, with no lube I get at least 15K miles, but I change out the front sprocket every oil change and I think that is the key. With the amount of off road riding I do, I would change the chain out anyway at that point. So, ymmv I guess.
    #25
  6. mousitsas

    mousitsas Long timer

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    Probably we could 'save' a bit on front sprockets if we reverse them once before throwing them away...
    #26
  7. WhereIsBobL

    WhereIsBobL Adventurer

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    Thanks. I find it easy to get someone to tell you how long their chain (or tires etc) last, but hard to find out what they consider "worn". A good example is the chain I just replaced at 22k miles. The front sprocket was toast, thin teeth starting to hook. The rear sprocket looked pretty good and had little wear. The chain would pull away from the rear sprocket a half tooth with a good strong pull. With your method (mine, partly, as well) my chain would be considered almost gone, but not quite. Maybe worth replacing the front sprocket and continuing, maybe not.

    I measured the links very accurately. They were getting towards at the spec limit that Triumph puts in thier service manual. Actually had a long way to go to get to where the ownners manual stated they should be. For me, and my uses I think I did the right thing changing the set, but it would have been smarter for me to have changed the front sprocket about 6k miles ago, then run the chain for a bit longer. Well, that's my opinion of the moment anyway.

    I have seen people change their chain when it first starts getting noisy, and I have seen people run their chains until the chain breaks, skips over the teeth or some of the links won't bend. So, when someone says their chain lasted 2 million miles, you don't know what they did and the data is mostly useless. Funny though, how the old tried and true method of pulling the chain at the rear sprocket works about as good as anything........... BUT, I would add that it is also important to check the chain at different points, and inspect each link for damage as the majority of the chain can be in great shape, and one link be ready to go due to a lost o-ring or something. (I assume you do that) I saw one chain like that.
    #27
  8. mousitsas

    mousitsas Long timer

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    Yes, funny how sometimes 'backyard mechanics' recipes work.
    To be honest, I never go to the lengths of inspecting every link individually, but then again, I never totally neglect my chains and always buy the safe best. For me 'safe best' is golden series DID X-ring at the manufacturer's specified width. No thin chain conversions for me.
    The 'pull the chain' check I do throughout the length of the chain, when I go past half my expected mileage and every time I lube the chain I put the bike on the center stand and turn the wheel to see if there is an obvious kink somewhere.
    #28
  9. FINNDIAN

    FINNDIAN Mine goes to 11

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    Amazing how results differ. i've been using good d.i.d. Erv3 chains and only get about 10k kms. My rear 45 is petty much toast by then
    Too but the front looks mint. this year i've switched to 17/47 as it will provide less tooth repeats on the rear.
    Like geek says riding style has the most to do with it.

    Sent from my XT910 using Tapatalk 2
    #29
  10. mousitsas

    mousitsas Long timer

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    I suspect that your chain and rear sprocket are exposed to a lot of grinding material, sand maybe? That might explain why the front sees less wear.
    #30
  11. BOB RAMSAY

    BOB RAMSAY Not in the Clique -

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    #31
  12. Balsta

    Balsta Been here awhile

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    #32
  13. charlie264

    charlie264 Long timer

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    I need to do some back peddling. I’ve always changed all three together, since they wear simultaneously. If the chain is warn putting a new sprocket with that chain wears the sprocket out faster and vice versa. I measured the DID chain at 15k miles and it’s still in spec, the rear sprocket has very little wear....I should have flipped the front at 7k miles... Point is these x ring chains don’t half last; I would expect a normal chain to be shot at 20k miles max, so my thinking now is in tune with others, measure chain and change the front sprocket when needed.
    #33
  14. syzygy9

    syzygy9 Been here awhile

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    Here is a slightly off topic question; has anyone had a catastrophic chain failure on a 990 with a reasonably new (<10,000km) chain. Just wondering how important it is to carry a spare chain or links. I guess the older the chain the higher the chance of failure.
    #34
  15. charlie264

    charlie264 Long timer

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    I’d say if you’re travelling in remote areas a few spare links and tool is advisable, never bust a 525 chain myself. As for wear, measure the chain, if in spec I wouldn’t worry, inspect for play, missing x/o rings and rollers. I am impressed with the OEM DID x ring chains, amazing longevity.
    #35
  16. Apple Jam

    Apple Jam Forest Flyer

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    #36
  17. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    I broke a 525 Regina on a rocky 2 track in Mexico about 4 years ago, with less than 3000 miles on it, and I was not running it too tight. Maybe just a bad link. Of course, since I had a fairly new chain I figured that I wouldnt need links or a chain tool. :lol3 Had to get a 530 (which thankfully just barely cleared the clutch slave) shipped out of Guadalajara as I couldnt find a 525. The end result was that it cost me $180 USD, two nights in a hotel, and a $200 bar tab. :lol3

    After that experience I have always carried a chain tool, links and masters and of course have not had any chain problems in the last 55,000 miles. :rofl
    #37