Static Tire Balancer--Is this one any good?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by espacef1fan, Nov 14, 2012.

  1. espacef1fan

    espacef1fan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    692
    Location:
    Clarksville, TN
    #1
  2. bhorocks

    bhorocks Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Oddometer:
    346
    Location:
    Phoenix az
    #2
  3. espacef1fan

    espacef1fan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    692
    Location:
    Clarksville, TN
    I just read all the reviews for that balancer, it seems all of the shafts are bent from the box...no good. I want to like the $39.99 thing..but..yeah. :/
    #3
  4. clapped_r6

    clapped_r6 The Spoad Warrior

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,744
    Location:
    Ridgefield, WA
    "marc parnes" balancer

    sometimes they pop up used
    #4
  5. espacef1fan

    espacef1fan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    692
    Location:
    Clarksville, TN
    I like it...but how important is it to get the shaft perfectly level? I mean jackstands only get so close....
    #5
  6. Rd650

    Rd650 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    Oddometer:
    238
    Location:
    Clemson SC
    +1 on the HF trueing stand. Worth $40 for sure.
    #6
  7. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,289
    Location:
    chicagoland
    Do the search for balancing stands on this site. You can build yourself a 'dead on rails' balancer for about $10. It works so good that it is scary. Original article can be found some years back in Motorcycle Consumer News under DYI Motorcycle Wheel Balancer. Visit http://board.mcnews.com/ and look at the article index till you find it. Annoys me no end that the info isn't on the 'free' section of the site.
    #7
  8. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,824
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap
    I built one very similar to this but did not want thumbscrews. So I simply made the cones "stepped" to fit my Husky and KTM wheels. I also simplified the mounts. I used 1/2" drill rod and 1/2" shielded bearings. It's very accurate. If you don't have a lathe, you'd have to have a machine shop turn up the cones. I tried it once with sealed bearings and they have too much resistance. Shielded works great.

    Here's a pic I found of the dead on rails.

    [​IMG]

    I drop mine down on jack stands, takes seconds to set up. Mine is pictured with the KTM cones on it which are 20 & 26mm I think. The Husky ones are setting next to it. I also made some housings for the bearings but they serve no purpose.

    Total cost was maybe $20.

    Here's what I used, Mcmaster catalog stinks for linking parts, but I listed the part numbers.

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/118/3673/=k6iwi2

    Tool steel 0.5000" ±0.001" 8893K451 $5.06

    1/2" ID 1 1/8" OD double shielded ball bearings 6384K61 $7.98

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #8
  9. ohgood

    ohgood Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,209
    Location:
    alabama
    I don't get it... what's wrong with the stock axle and two lawnchairs ?

    no, really.
    #9
  10. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,824
    Location:
    Turning expensive metal into scrap
    The friction of the seals in the bearings is enough for it not to be accurate.

    I tried mine with brand new precision sealed bearings and it was not accurate. Asking old wheel bearings to do this work not happening.

    With the shielded bearings, it's much more accurate. I will let it settle, and move the wheel maybe 1-2 degrees and it will go right back to settled after clocking back and forth.

    With open bearings it would be even more accurate but they are really hard to keep clean.

    I notice a huge difference on the road with my dirt bike tires, especially since I am running rimlocks. My KTM has the valve core and rimlock in the same 30 degrees so it's really out of whack the Husky at least offsets them.
    #10
  11. ragtoplvr

    ragtoplvr Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    6,697
    Location:
    central USA
    I have a Harbor Freight one, it is within about 1/2 ounce. How do I know. I balance as perfect as I can. Then take wheel off and remount. Then I re-balance, taping the weights in place. Doing this several times, I never have needed over about 1/4 oz to rebalance.

    I have tested the tires to 120 and no vibration. Beemer likes that, ran a LOT smoother for a while. Good enough for me.

    Rod
    #11
  12. Jamming

    Jamming Desert RAT

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,916
    Location:
    Buckeye AZ.
    #12
  13. mendoje

    mendoje Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    251
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I also have the Harbor Freight balancer. Take the bearings out, peel out the bearing shields and toss 'em. Then flush out the grease and lube with very light oil. You'll be able to balance to a 1/4 ounce or less no problem.
    #13
  14. espacef1fan

    espacef1fan Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Oddometer:
    692
    Location:
    Clarksville, TN
    This sounds like good advice!
    #14
  15. racer1735

    racer1735 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Oddometer:
    376
    Location:
    Amarillo/Canyon, TX
    Not all the shafts are bent. I can attest to that. Genreally the bent ones are the few that speak up about them (that thing about the 'greasy wheel', you know?) You may have to true up the uprights, but that is easy. And the bearings work exceptionally smoothly.
    #15
  16. ragtoplvr

    ragtoplvr Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    6,697
    Location:
    central USA
    then when your bearings get dirt in then they will work much worse.

    You can pop a shield, wash out the grease, oil and put the shield back in. But really, it is plenty close with them in. I never feel a shake

    Rod
    #16
  17. ParaMud

    ParaMud Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    Oddometer:
    631
    Location:
    Orange, CA
    psh make your own. I made this out of wood lying around.
    [​IMG]
    #17
  18. buls4evr

    buls4evr No Marks....

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,318
    Location:
    Michissippi & Nuevo Mexico
    Or picnic table, chunk of 4X4 just right and stock axle.... Really cheap.
    #18
  19. triplenickel

    triplenickel Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,430
    Location:
    Campbell River, BC. Fantasy Island
    I use 1/2" round stock with a magnetic torpedo level hung from it, pretty simple. No point in over thinking this shit eh? I have my favorite tires like everyone and when chainging like for like it pretty much never changes.
    #19
  20. buls4evr

    buls4evr No Marks....

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,318
    Location:
    Michissippi & Nuevo Mexico

    Seriously does not matter a hell of a lot. First time you hit a BFR it changes anyway! Only the Starbucks crowd agonizes over wheel balancing:D. They don't ride over BFRs.....
    #20