staying warm on a scooter

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by damasovi, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    HI,

    I need some ideas on how to stay warm on the scooter. Since the watts are on the low I can not rvn electric gear, so instead I have come with very few ideas.

    The only thing I am doing now is using Hand mitts that I bough from here: I had some made for an ATV but too big, this ones look and fit good.
    http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/5/18/173/21047/ITEM/Kwik-Tek-ScootR-Logic-Hand-Mitts.aspx

    So what else? I know a windshield will make a difference so I will try that latter, and and!!!????

    Damasovi
    #1
  2. Woodsrat

    Woodsrat Gone ridin'

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    Who says you can't run an electric vest? I ran my basic Widder vest all winter on an '01 Honda Elite 50 and had no problem with it running down the battery. It kept me toasty warm during a typical Indiana winter. No clue of how many watts it pulls, though. Maybe somebody else here can fill us in on that.

    For what it's worth I also ran this vest off of the lighting circuit of my XR-250R that had no battery whatsoever.

    If the worry of your battery discharging keeps you awake at night plug the little bugger in--or pack a small trickle charger if you travel.

    I guess I ought to mention that this vest use was on a 15 mile commute to work plus local running. Would it discharge the battery if I rode it all day? No clue. It had a backup kicker and started easily with it even in cold temps so I wasn't concerned.
    #2
  3. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer

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    Try to figure out where you are loosing the most heat and do something about it. It does no good to have a really warm jacket and lose heat elsewhere. One area many riders neglect is their head & neck. A thin Balaclava that covers your head ( under a full face helmet of course) and tucks into your jacket collar makes a HUGE difference. How about your legs? Are they really warm or are you loosing heat there? Wind proof riding pants with lots of insulation underneath works best.

    If you can keep most of your body warm, then blood will keep flowing to your hands and feet which tend to be the first things to feel cold.

    Exercise a little and be thoroughly warmed up before you start riding. This works well on shorter rides.

    Of course, when all that is not enough.....go electric. Your scooter may be able to handle the load when engine RPM is up. Most likely your battery will discharge when the engine is idleing so you may have problems if in heavy traffic where you sit a lot.
    #3
  4. Simplyred

    Simplyred Been here awhile

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    Yes you can! You can use electrics even on a scooter. I have build a personal heating belt which I carry between layers of clothing, and the heat will typically flow upward between the layers. Energy comes from a 10cel NiMH racing pack 2700Ma.
    Total warming capacity is 22 watts (I use 2 heating foils that are 11 watts each) which is enough to bake you if you do not run a heattroller in the system somewhere, which is what I still have to implement. But the system in itself works at only little expense. The most expensive part was the racing pack.
    #4
  5. Fast_Boy_Slim

    Fast_Boy_Slim Don't call me Wighty

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    One of these?

    [​IMG]
    #5
  6. JerseyBiker

    JerseyBiker Living the life!

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    ^
    Yes! When I had my Helix I bought a lap cover like from from Italy. Between that and my fake hippo hands, I was able to ride until the high 20s with no heated gear and still feel toasty.

    Also, keep in mind there is also heated gear that runs from self contained rechargeable batteries. I think they last up to about 5 hours or so.

    Kudos to you for riding when the weather is cold! :clap
    #6
  7. La Machine

    La Machine 2>4

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    "No such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing."

    Invest in a quality set on long underwear and some windproof pants/jacket, and you'll be all set. Electrics are optional.

    After that, absolutely get a big windshield; the big "riot shield" on my ET4 kept me warm all winter, and even kept me dry in all but the heaviest rain.
    #7
  8. Tarka

    Tarka Doesn't wave back.

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    I`ll resist the temptation to be smug about my Burgman 650 Executive with its heated seats, heated grips and fully adjustable,effective screen. :evil :D

    But in all honesty,decent thermal lined and windproof bike gear is all you need.

    I don`t have heated clothing...and apart from on the Burgie (which I won`t really use much through the Winter anyway because of our heavily salted roads) I don`t have heated grips,or anything on any of my other bikes,not even a screen....and I ride in all weathers....and do several Winter camping rallies.

    But thanks to my (admittedly pricey) Hein Gericke thermal lined Goretex gear I`m warm and dry throughout even the worst weather.

    Only very occasionally in severe frosty conditions do I put some 'Hippo Hands' on my main Winter-use Ural...they do help,but my Hein Gericke Pathan gloves are okay without them to be honest.

    I`ve always wondered just how much someone would suffer in misery if their heated gear packed up while miles away from their destination....and once you start using it I think you`d end up relying on it too much.

    I think it better to have good gear on yourself rather than specific 'add ons' on a bike that may not be transferred from machine to machine.
    #8
  9. Woodsrat

    Woodsrat Gone ridin'

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    Worries me, too. When I go away from home I pack the original controller for the vest (I have a waterproof unit hardwired on to the bike) along with repair items for the plugs. In ten years of use/abuse the vest has been totally reliable, though--and my buddy used it for awhile before I got it so I have no clue of how many hours use are on it.

    They definitely spoil you. The medication I'm on now "thins my blood out" and I chill pretty easy. There's no way I could ride now without my vest/chaps and I even use it on those cool rainy days in the summer to break the chill. I highly recommend anyone who rides during the winter to look into electric clothing. I rode year 'round for twenty-five years before I tried them and as Tarka says now I can't live without them!!
    #9
  10. tastroman

    tastroman Long timer

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    If you don't have a tall windscreen, get one and ride tucked behind it. A full face helmet and a neck gator are also essential IMO if your going without electrics.
    #10
  11. Hoseman

    Hoseman pushing rocks.....

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    I don't mean to sound like an ass but........

    Does it really get that cold in Ensenada?


    Summary of monthly average temperatures and precipitation.
    Month: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
    High Temp. 66 68 68 70 72 73 75 77 77 75 72 66
    Low Temp. 48 50 50 55 57 59 63 66 63 57 54 50
    Precipitation 1.9 1.5 1.5 0.8 0.2 0 0 0 0.1 0.3 1.2 1.7
    The above numbers are degrees fahrenheit and inches.

    Source
    #11
  12. lowbuckrider

    lowbuckrider Been here awhile

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    I figure our weather isn't that different. I have always been able to ride year round with a windshield, Tour master Vision pants, GP moto jacket with liner and insulted gloves.
    #12
  13. damasovi

    damasovi Long timer

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    and your point is? lol!!! yes I know COMPARE to other places it is not "cold". How ever I do ride before 7 am and after 7 pm so that means no "average" temperatures for me.

    Thanks everybody for the answers so far. I have invested more time and reso
    urces this winter. I have a thermal base layer that I had been buying for the last e-4 years, I think I need some good socks, because there is were I get cold the most.

    The winter gear I have is what everybody has mention, the jacket, balaclava, winter gloves, pats with liners and I added
    the Tall neck dickie from schampa and the hand mitts. I am missing the wind shield, next week I will go and look at them.
    That blanket like is nice, I may want one, depending on price if it is not too expensive, if it is, then I still have the rain gear that can be p
    ut on.

    Damasovi
    #13
  14. Shirker

    Shirker Been here awhile

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    "and insulted gloves."

    <!-- / message --><!-- sig -->Is that like a distressed finsh on them?
    #14
  15. alicethomas

    alicethomas Been here awhile

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    Protect against the wind!
    I use rain overcoats, not only an overall (or separate jacket/throuser), but overcoats for gloves (imho very important!) and shoes too.
    And of course the usual warm stuff too (perhaps ski/mountain/arctic equipment).

    But in any case undercooling might be a hazard, so plan your breaks at a place which provides some shelter (fuel station, ...) where you can walk around/make gymnastic, have a warm drink ...

    You might need a good helmet too. With pinlock visor is a matter of course, but perhaps you need a heated visor.
    Or you take a cross helmet and ski goggles, then your face doesn't need to warm up much air in front of your eyes.
    If you think you are well prepared, you can join the krystall rally (-30°C is common) or something similar in Alaska.
    Once there was a tv documentation about some siberian bikers who did their trip to the "cold pole" during winter times and camping in the taiga - they experienced nearly -50°C.
    #15
  16. fullmetalscooter

    fullmetalscooter Let me take this duck off

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    You could get heated grips but really Cold it's snowing outside here with 6 inches on the ground. I ll be riding around the 6 days in weather between - something and around 50 F. At the Canada in border they wore so helpful and joyful today when they said it's going to snow. I guess they got tired of raining on other peoples parades. Oh well You should see the us guards. They joyfully haul you in, Tell you to take off you clothing and place a finger where the sun don't shine. :eek1 In View of giving good service they ll also tell you if your prostate is healthy. :lol3 You also have to dress for the weather guy as dumb as that sounds. My gear for the roads tomorrow is going to be long johns, winter riding pants, layering clothing etc. If your riding with summer gear head over to motorcycle supper store .com , ironpony.com etc. For a small lay out you can get winter / fall riding pants and jacket.
    #16
  17. la's

    la's Adventurer

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    Full face helmet with chin thingy, buff cyclone neck thingy, battery heated vest/jacket under mc jacket and battery heated mc gloves. A big thing that I occasionally forget about is the importance of only wearing poly, wool or silk against the skin. I minimized their importance the other day and was slightly miserable (wore a cotton shirt). This includes silk or wool liners with either my heated gloves or regular winter gloves. I have each temperature range figured out for my comfort and ride happily. I have been able to avoid getting a windshield. I know that others swear by them. I am just not interested. I do have hand guards on a bike and they do keep the wind from hitting my gloves, but I don't consider them necessary.
    #17
  18. bandito2

    bandito2 Been here awhile

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    Personally, I figure it best to have warm weather clothing that does not depend on any electro-mechanical force for generating warmth other than the natural chemical reactions my own body provides. I am my own heater.
    A good used snowmobile suit from a second hand/thrift store is economical to keep in the body heat. I mean what would you do if your bike craps out on you and you are on some long abandoned, God forsaken road out in Kow-Dung China or some such and you have to hoof it. Really it depends on how far you may need to walk and how long you may have to endure the elements if you must and how cold it actually is/may get that would determine what kind and how much weather gear you may need to take with you.
    Common sense should be your guide. Balaclava, boots, gloves/mittens. I have covers that I made for my handlebars much like "Hippo-Hands" that work just great for keeping the wind and rain off of my hands. It can get warm, so I just open up some of the layers to prevent overheating and sweating. (which paradoxically can be dangerous in frigid weather)
    Sometimes I'll even slip the rain jacket on over whatever else I'm wearing as an added windbreaker to lessen wind chill effect. It helps to keep you dry too. Cold... eh... OK. ... Wet.... eh... OK... Wet and cold at the same time.... NOT so good.
    Stay dry and dress in easy to open/ventilate/removable layered clothing. Easiest fundamental approach to keeping warm in any outside activity.
    #18
  19. wanna bECO

    wanna bECO Been here awhile

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    Wow, this is a great thread and Bandito... good points about being "self contained". I think we all wear jackets that would keep us warm while walking and (god forbid) pushing our bikes. It's that added chill ya get going even just 45 mph that really kills it for me.

    I live in phoenix and we can ride year round in flip flops and a tshirt if ya really want, but the bad thing is, after being here so long, my blood is so thin, that I start shivering at 70F :rofl

    I haven't bought them yet cuz I'm poor right now but...

    cheap hippo hands on amazon
    and...
    twice the price but twice as nice

    They both have good reviews and look sturdier than the ones from the OP. If anyone wants to buy me the cheapies for a late xmas gift let me know:D

    Stay warm!
    #19
  20. alicethomas

    alicethomas Been here awhile

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    Yesterdays ride was 300km and 2 hikes during constant below zero temperatures.
    Equipment: textile gear and additional rain suit.

    Moderate -5°C in the town this morning, but still no snow in sight. So I visited the snow in the "Schwarzwald" (black forest).
    Last mist at the "Mehliskopf", before walking up the "Badenener Höhe" (picures with deers and wild pigs in the forest and view from top omitted)
    [​IMG]
    My scooter at "Mummelsee", already 1029m altitude
    [​IMG]
    View back from the ascent to "Hornisgrinde"
    [​IMG]
    On the top, some (abandoned) military buildings
    [​IMG]
    View to France with the Vosges hills.
    [​IMG]
    I could even see the Swiss alps with the mountain "Tödi", but my old camera couldn't take the picture.
    Carefully back over some short patches of snow and ice.
    (My rekord was a ride at -18°C, but after some hours riding is becomes a little bit crisp and takes some time at home to warm-up again.)
    #20