Stella Advice ?

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by kdude, Dec 6, 2005.

  1. kdude

    kdude orgasmatron engineer

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    Are Stella scooters reliable. Do any of you guys or gals have one and would like to talk about your ride.

    What do you like about the Stella ?

    What problems have you had ?

    Did your dealer have problems fixing your ride or have trouble getting parts ?

    Would you buy another Stella ?

    thx, hp
    #1
  2. Photog

    Photog Charismatic Megafauna Administrator

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    It's a bonafide classic. Classic appeal that's instantly recognizable; people flock to it and are fascinated, usually start telling "when I was in europe" stories. Durable design that's been proven all over the world in crappy conditions. Cheap parts are readily available. Fun to ride. Easy to hodrod. Has a unique ride and "feel" to it. Manual transmission allows for control, fun. Old school cred. The 150cc reed valve engine is sweet. Stops quickly, handles exceptionally well. I've ridden it in monsoons w/o a problem, done dirt/gravel roads easily. Wouldn't hesitate to load it up for a camping weekend on the same dirt/gravel stuff I do on the GS.

    None. Just the usual tightening of loose bolts here and there occasionally.

    I bought mine second hand. 2003 with 116 miles, with Pinasco kit, 24G, and JL/SIP lefty pipe already installed by PO, but not dialed in. I completed the install and went from there.

    Top end of 70+, cruises at 60, happy as a pig in poo at 45. Will pull from a stop in 3rd with almost no clutch slipping.

    Yes, without hesitation. It's been one of the most satisfying-to-own motorcycles I've ever had and perfect for short-haul work as well as weekend touring.

    Caveat: though they are durable and reliable, I think that they are best appreciated by someone who wants to tinker a bit with them. Though they are an 80's era PXseries Vespa brought up to date with some modern upgrades, this isn't a Helix or similar modern product. I think motorcyclists who tend to like to customize their rides, and fiddle with them a bit, are best suited to these bikes. Someone who just wants a turnkey appliance will enjoy it, but not as much as someone who's into the history, mechanicals, etc.

    As I've tried to dial in my Stella (the carb I have on it is finicky) I've screwed it up yet it has never failed to start, never left me stranded.
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  3. kdude

    kdude orgasmatron engineer

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    thanks for the excellent info. re: Stella. Seems not only to be a reliable ride but because it's a hot looking sexy machine it will look really good next to my GS...... ciao hp:thumb
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  4. Photog

    Photog Charismatic Megafauna Administrator

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    Here's what sold me on it.

    Go to http://www.scooterworks.com/ and order a free printed catalog.

    That'll give you an idea of parts pricing and availability, plus it has some tips here and there. There are cutaway drawings of the mechanicals, as well as a huge selection of accessories. It'll give you an idea of how the bike is put together, what's available to add to it, and the replacement parts pricing. They're pretty cheap--a clutch cable, for instance, is about $4. Though the catalog covers all the Vespas, you'll be looking at primarily the PX150 series Vespa, which is what the Stella is.

    The Stella is an indian-built Vespa. LML built Vespas under license for a number of years, then provided the rebadged Vespa as the "Stella" to importer Genuine Scooters. It's also marketed as the Belladonna in NZ, and is sold as the LML Star series overseas. Whiile it's always been a sort of icon, it's also workhorse transportation for lots of people in asia, so it's designed to be flogged daily over crappy roads.

    The difference between the Stella and the current PX150 is here:
    http://www.provoscooter.com/px150/stellavspx.htm

    For a wealth of Stella info and the best tech stuff, go to www.stellaspeed.com. Keep an eye on their classifieds section for occasional deals. Cheapest I've seen one go for was $1900; most are in the $2K range.
    #4
  5. R1150GSA

    R1150GSA Saint "Alloy"sius

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    Get the Jet Black one. They're faster.
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  6. Photog

    Photog Charismatic Megafauna Administrator

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    Answer the questions! :thwak


    (seriously...I'm curious about how you're feeling about the Stella since you've had it a while)
    #6
  7. R1150GSA

    R1150GSA Saint "Alloy"sius

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    Are you kidding? How can I conceal my glee? She's all I think about anymore. I'm using her in parables. I'm calling it a "her".

    I've created a dysfunctional little environment in the garage where the Stella is the most prominent vehicle. The K75S and the GS have their own places, but Stella, well she's front and center.

    One of the things I'm enjoying most about the scooter is the freestyle attitude I've adopted for riding it. Carhartt jacket, elkskin roper gloves, lighter boots, lighter helmet, lighter everything. It's not as much of a big production as getting on the big bikes.

    Since most of the driving I do occurs in-town I don't have to get in the car. It's not even the gas issue (although I must admit I smile knowing I'm using less). It's got more to do with travelling small. It's biblical for me - Luke 10:3-4.

    Does that answer your question?
    #7