Straps for securing duffles, etc.

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by burmbuster, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. NJ Moto

    NJ Moto Running Free

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    That's what I was thinking. I would think elastic would have your load shifting all over the place on a bumpy road or offroad.
    #61
  2. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    I looked into getting the elastic cord, and buckles and such from strap works, and some other places, it really didnt seem much cheaper than just buying Rok straps.

    I still havent bought any though, I use cheap bungees 99% of the time.
    #62
  3. Walterxr650l

    Walterxr650l Long timer

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    I like bungee cords. The thick ones, 1/2 inch diameter. They are inexpensive, readily available at most good hardware stores, and easy to use. They work well when used right.

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    Walter
    #63
  4. eap

    eap El Adventurero Solitario

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  5. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    These are not rubber bands. But there is no convincing someone who will not even try them. Like making my daughter try bacon. Not going to happen, and she has no idea what she is missing!:deal

    Jim :brow
    #65
  6. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    Here's the difference. You are carrying a 100lb toolbox with the straps just to keep the load from shifting right?

    I use NRS straps to hold my cataraft together. And when that raft tips over and the hydraulics of a hole strong enough to flip an experienced rafter take over, the forces are severe. I can tell you I have had my specialized guide jacket ripped off because the zipper failed and my shorts ripped off because, well my waist failed in one really bad hole. I was underwater for at least 30-45 seconds getting the crap beat out of me. By the time it was done I felt like I had done 9 rounds with Holyfield and never landed a punch.

    here's a typical cat setup (not my pics)

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    and what happens when you "hiside":lol3

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    Cat was bouncing happily downsteam no drama. The drybags probably weighed 50lbs each and I had 2 or 3 secured with one strap.

    Here's how much I trust NRS straps. I had to do a waterfall rescue years ago, and it was a split decision type of thing where 3 of us guides had to get to someone sorta drowning very quickly. I needed to rappel down about 30' of rock. The only equipment we had was a few NRS straps, 5 carabiners, a pulley and a 75' rafting throw bag of 1/2' line. We used the strap to hook around the tree, carabiner to the pulley and I made a swiss seat from the other strap and used the line to rappel down the rock face. I have 2 NRS straps I am trusting my life to. Still have both and use both 10 years later.

    I'm sure the Roc Straps are great, but I use what I know. In response to gear flying off peoples bike, that doesn't happen to me. And it doesn't happen for a good reason. Anything that won't fit in my panniers, doesn't come. I'm constantly amazed at the luxo barges that roll into ADV rallys for a WEEKEND campout with gear lashed on all over the place. I've done two weeks of remote camping in Maine with nothing other than what I can fit in my bags. The only thing I strap on is a flyrod or something.

    I've refined my camp setup to include things that don't take up space because I don't like the liability of duffels hanging out for the safety reasons mentioned.

    Anyways it sounds like there are a lot of Rok Straps fans so they must be excellent. I have not tried them because I have had a system that has worked for me over multiple applications over the years. I think people need to learn how to pack efficiently that way they wouldn't need so much reliance on straps of any kind or maybe a small duffel etc.

    JMHO
    #66
  7. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

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    I use a Bison strap, pretty much the same thing as the NRS strap, but the cam has a large carabiner integrated into it and the webbing ends are sewn into loops.

    One end gets a girth hitch around a frame rail, the carabiner gets clipped to another frame rail, the strap is tensioned and bitter end secured. I use the compression of the load (or in the case of a hard object, compression of the pillion seat its sitting on) to keep everything from wiggling.

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    Also handy for holding the GS in stinkbug while doing transmission/clutch work.
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    #67
  8. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    I love all the proper nautical terms:D
    #68
  9. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

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    I've spent too much time working in the shipyard to *not* use them.
    #69
  10. sailah

    sailah Lampin' it

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    Hear ya. I routinely refer to the back of my bike as the aft end
    #70
  11. Twilight Error

    Twilight Error Going nowhere slowly

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    I have a hard time not referring to the cylinders as port and starboard.
    #71
  12. Backonthebike

    Backonthebike Giddy up

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    http://www.andystrapz.com/products.php?productCategoryId=17&Level=1

    Have a look at these, made by a one-man operation called Andy Strapz here in Australia. The 2" wide velcro holds very well. The hand loops enable you to get good tension. The webbing is nowhere near as stretchy as bungee rubber so it holds very firmly without having to stretch the living crap out of it.

    Here is an extreme application (my first time on a 2-up long distance adventure) ...I didn't know any better. That's his and hers bedrolls on the top of the panniers.

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    And here is more more usual arrangement

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    I have no commercial connection with Andy, but have always found him a top bloke to deal with, and his stuff works.

    Cheers
    Tim
    #72
  13. guavadude

    guavadude de-composer

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    Full size rok straps for the large duffel but I just got a set of the smaller skinnier rok straps that are perfect for holding a 30 liter dry bag that I keep on the bike for tools, rain gear and layers.
    #73
  14. _cy_

    _cy_ Long timer

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    that's a pretty endorsement for NRS straps .. using some generic version of same strap. but real NRS straps costs about the same. might as well get a few NRS straps.
    #74
  15. guavadude

    guavadude de-composer

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    yeah I wouldn't use the skinny Rok Straps to repel from the passenger pegs to the ground, but they seem to hold my drybag on.
    #75
  16. PMC

    PMC riding rider

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    :lol3
    They work great on my drybag too
    #76
  17. THUMPER0475

    THUMPER0475 Adventurer

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    I totally agree with Scqtt, I have the simple inexpensive campmor straps. They work very well. I accidentally had a strap end become entangled in my chain and sprocket doing 30 mph luckily when it caught it cinched tight and finally snapped the strap. I didn't go down the bike was fine. It did scare me, wan't expecting the noise but was over quickly. All I had to do was trim the broken strap burn the raw edge with a match and restrap my gear. You must tie nots in left over strap ends succurely, we check often
    #77
  18. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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    what is a buggy cord?
    #78
  19. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    I've used ROK straps in all my travels to hold all kinds of things to my bikes. From typical soft bags to very large logs, tires, pricey camera gear, folding kayaks, gas cans, Pelican Cases, beer, etc, etc. I've strapped it all down with ROK straps on anything from long street rides to the most difficult trails I can ride a bike on. I've even towed other bikes off the trail with them. Many miles on rough roads or no road at all. Before discovering them years ago I tried various other methods, but haven't looked back.
    I'm also a ESTA certified rigger and know a thing or two about safely rigging loads. I trust ROK straps for all my bike rigging needs.
    The hybrid design that will still keep tension on the strap if your load shifts or compresses is why I believe they are superior. Self tightening action, and I've yet to break one.

    I can't help but give ROK straps two thumbs up, if you use other methods and that works for you, great, but for those looking for a reliable, safe way to keep hold of your gear on a bike, they are hard to beat IMO.


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    #79
  20. cug

    cug --

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    I think that means quite something ... :lol3

    I mean, rigger and all ... have worked in that business long enough to know what that means - and I'm following your ride reports. Awesome btw!
    #80