Stripped oil drain plug

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by RedShark, Mar 1, 2013.

  1. RedShark

    RedShark Long timer

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    Neighbor of mine liked my Wee-Strom so much he went out and bought a nice clean used on last month.

    Looks to be in good shape and aside from some odd suspension settings and stranger tire wear (looks like the guy rode it with very low air pressure) the bike seems a good one....

    Except, it has - from purchase - slowly dripped oil from low on the engine.

    Upon inspection, it looks like it's coming from the drain plug.

    So we put it up on the bench and see if the plug is loose. Nope. Its on like Donkey Kong. Someone Gorrilla'd the thing on TO THE MAX. Moderate tightening pressure with a 8" ratchet yields 0 movement.

    So with some sweat and a long ratchet bar, I remove said drain plug and drain the oil into the pan.

    The oil-drain bolt has TWO smushed 'crush' washers on it - looks like someone forgot to take the old on off last oil change. I use a pick and small pliers and remove them both, put on a new crush washer and install the bolt without cranking on it hard - I use a nice short ratchet for that so as not to strip anything.

    Then I return the oil to the crankcase. About half-way into the pour I see circular metal 'shavings' in the oil still in the pan, so I stop. Upon inspection these are some of the crank-cases aluminum threads from the drain.

    Dammit.

    Drain all the oil back out, put bike in the "hold" parking and get out the beer, 'cause NOW I got some thinkin' to do.

    What it the best 'plan' ? Anyone of you guys have to deal with this ? How about on a DL-650 - the drain is in the case, not a separate 'pan' like on some motors.

    A) Spooge some sort of goop on the drain bolt and re-install

    B) Find some miracle plug

    C) Drill, tap and install a Heli-coil

    D) ???

    E) Profit

    Never should have fucked with it, I know....
    #1
  2. RedShark

    RedShark Long timer

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    Yeah, I know - check the Blinker fluid & replace the muffler bearings...
    #2
  3. RedShark

    RedShark Long timer

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    Kinda what I'm fearing - looks like a 12mm bolt with a 125 thread, wonder if they make a nice long Heli-coil for that ?

    Of course the thought of drilling up into the motor - even with a vaccuum collecting the drillings is pretty scary... Dammit.Dammit.Dammit.
    #3
  4. D_A

    D_A Long timer

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    Another vote for the heli-coil. I had this happen to me on an old car of mine once. The neighbourhood kids learnt some new words that day.
    #4
  5. tcourdin

    tcourdin Resident Spooner

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    #5
  6. AustinJake

    AustinJake TE450-KLE-FXDWG

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    Or a simple single, double or triple oversize drain plug, cuts its own threads, put one on my HD thousands of miles ago.

    [​IMG]
    #6
  7. Bounder

    Bounder ExternallyDisplaced

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    Drill and tap the existing plug with a 6 or 8mm thread, thoroughly clean and degrease the existing hole, use some JB weld to stick the old plug in permanently.
    A standard 6mm or 8mm bolt with a small copper washer will reseal the hole, and being steel to steel won't give as much grief as steel in aluminium.
    #7
  8. TeneRay

    TeneRay 2>4

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    IMO, You don't want to helicoil. You'll want to time-sert the plug hole. Had to do it to the Vee a year ago.
    #8
  9. Unstable Rider

    Unstable Rider Moto Fotografist

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    remind me to never buy a used bike. I hate those kind of surprises :puke1
    #9
  10. C-Stain

    C-Stain Accredited Nincompoop

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    I had a Drain Plug strip on a ZG1200 Voyager a few years ago. Took it to the local machine shop because I was too busy to fix it myself, for the machinist to put in a Helicoil for me. He didn't.

    He used a "Pipe Plug".

    Damn thing worked great until the day I plowed the damn Voyager into a guardrail. When I parted out the bike, the pipe plug was still there...
    #10
  11. tommu56

    tommu56 Long timer

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    from another thread I posted in



    I hit a rock with mine on my klr and it messed up the threads.

    I put a timesert in using the oil plug kit to keep it straight.

    I did it by pulling the battery out laying bike on its side and doing the repair.

    New threads are fine even with the guide aluminum gasket (I'm assuming KTM has same set up) it would drip 10 or 20 drops a night.
    I figured i didn't get insert straight enough and ran a feeler gauge around the gasket and one side had a small gap.

    I tried plastic 1/2" Chevy drain plug gasket a little better but still drips.

    then I got some hydraulic fitting seal washers with bonded rubber ring in them.

    I might loose 1-2 drops a night it sure beats pulling the motor and having it welded up and re tapped and who knows if it will be straight and have the same issue??

    I do carry a 14mm plug and and tap and easy out to remove insert for repair if I have a problem


    [​IMG]


    A Dowty seal is a washer usually made of aluminum or copper and occasionally steel. Unlike an original crush washer, however, this product has a rubber lip on the inside diameter. A Dowty seal is essentially the same thing as a bonded washer, and is used in high pressure applications where other means of closing off are ineffective. Most types of Dowty seal and bonded washers are now available in a self-centralizing form, which eliminates the offset of the closure and makes installation that much easier.


    #11
  12. stevie88

    stevie88 That's gotta hurt

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    [​IMG]

    If you can't find an oversized drain plug, the preferred method, get an expandable rubber plug.
    #12
  13. tommu56

    tommu56 Long timer

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    #13