Studs

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by randyo, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    it's getting to be that time of year, winter will soon be upon us and I am trying to decide which route to take

    my previous experience with studs, I drilled stud pockets in Karoo Ts and inserted standard automotive studs with a pneumatic gun, I got 1 season out of the rear then went to the darkside with a General Altimax Arctic in the rear which I will continue to use

    my front lasted 4 seasons but now must be replaced, I am debating using Aerostitch self tapping studs instead. Anyone with any experience that can tell me if they work better or worse than regular studs ? Cost for studs from Stitch is outrageous,$109 per bag of 100.

    I know I'll need about 180 studs for my front wheel, I stud the center heaviest and the further from the center the fewer studs, outer knobs I leave unstudded, my theory is on ice, I won't be leaning much and when I am on dry pavement, I will want a rubber contact patch instead of studded after 4 winters and some insane conditions, my theory has held

    [​IMG]

    auto studs are $75 for a bag of 1000, I'm also thinking buying my own pneumatic gun $350-$400

    [​IMG]

    because the pockets that get drilled are not the correct shape like a molded stud pocket in a car tire, it takes 50-100 mile of sketchy riding for the studs to get seated, but once they get seated

    in 4 winters/approx 14k miles of use, I didn't throw any studs in the front tire

    I guess mostly I'd like experience of performance, longevity and whether or not Aerostitch studs are subject to getting thrown
    #1
  2. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    I've used both, and find standard automotive studs will stay in place longer. Function wise there is absolutely no difference.
    Keep in mind I'm using them on a sidecar rig that subjects them to lateral loads not experienced on a 2 wheeler, and that I push it much harder than you can on a 2 wheeler, so YMMV.

    A local tire shop will stud my tires for $40, as apposed to $100 for 1.5 tires with the aerostitch studs.
    #2
  3. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    do you drill your own stud pockets or do they so that as part of the $40?
    #3
  4. iamcanjim

    iamcanjim Snorting snow.

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    Here are some.

    [​IMG]

    Wait, what?
    #4
  5. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    Started out that they would drill them, but they decided it was too time consuming, and wanted $20 more if they drill.
    #5
  6. RobbieO

    RobbieO Muskokatard

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    [​IMG]
    #6
  7. Kafn8td

    Kafn8td Been here awhile

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  8. KustomizingKid

    KustomizingKid Been here awhile

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    I have done a lot of research on studs... There is a big difference between street studs and ice racing studs. Tungsten carbide is expensive, but the best for on the street.

    Those gnarly tires and linked ones are much more ice racing oriented.
    #8
  9. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    I have heard for other sources that aerostitch studs don't stay in place as well

    as far as pushin it, when riding in blizzard conditions or other "only lunatics are on the road conditions" , I find myself catching up with what ever is in front of me, then waiting for them to pull off, so I can speed up again, the car tire in back was an experiment that was successful beyond my wildest expectations and its not even studded, just a regular old winter tire

    what tires are you studding ? I had good luck with the Karoo T, which I'll probably use again, knobs are deep enuf for a 10mm stud
    #9
  10. windmill

    windmill Long timer

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    I've studded the Heidenau K37, Duro 207, and the Kenda 335. Unfortunately there are no automotive winter tires that will fit a Ural, though the k37 is also available in a winter traction compound they call "snowtex".

    When I say "pushing it" I mean nonsense such as drifting, full throttle power slides, doing doughnuts, steep climbs over rocks and deadfalls when off pavement, and riding snowmobile trails, which are all tough on studs.

    [​IMG]

    If you look close, you can see aerostich studs in a Duro 307 on the spare tire. I usually save it just for bad conditions such as solid ice, or fresh snow over compact snow or ice.

    [​IMG]
    #10
  11. Kafn8td

    Kafn8td Been here awhile

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    Ahh sorry, I thought you were building them for the ice.
    #11
  12. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    #12
  13. i_isntreal

    i_isntreal Been here awhile

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    Concerning drilling your own tires for automotive studs, I did it for my truck tires. The local tire shop 'experts' said that they would all fall out right away because of not having the correct ' mushroom shaped' hole. So I proved them wrong by doing a two step drilling process that gave me the correct hole shape (time consuming). Not to mention that I also dipped the studs in rubber cement before riveting them in (extra time consuming and messy). Worked like a charm and only lost 1 or 2 studs a tire over two winters of doing donuts and tail slides at every opportunity. It was definitely worth all the effort (and always enjoyable to prove the 'experts' wrong)

    Back to motorcycles, a former coworker did a lot of research into tire studding while making his own studding apparatus that took far less time than the hand gun. He commented that they used a black locktite for extra assurance. His experience was that the locktite bond was stronger than the rubber and studs that did come out had literally ripped a chunk of tire out with it.
    #13
  14. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    I say not worth the effort

    I just drilled straight holes using a burr bit

    did not loose a single stud in 4 winters/14k miles on my front tire
    #14
  15. scottrnelson

    scottrnelson Team Orange

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    This is a nice problem that I don't need a solution for. [​IMG]


    I'm curious how those studded tires behave on paved roads that aren't covered in ice or snow. I would expect them to be kind of dangerous in those conditions.
    #15
  16. randyo

    randyo Long timer

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    I can't say about the aerostitch studs, but the drilled & pneumaticly inserted auto studs, yes

    they act and handle the same as they do on a car, you can hear the tic tic tic of studs contacting the pavement, braking distance is increased, ride accordingly, cornering traction is reduced, ride accordingly, its not like you ride 100mph in freezing weather anyway, I don't stud the outer knobs just so that if I do lean that much and need the traction cornering, I'm not on the studded portion of the tire

    dangerous, not if you understand the limitations and ride accordingly
    #16
  17. jkm

    jkm Been here awhile

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    I run the Aerostich off-road studs in the rear tire (Kenda TrakMaster II) of my TE450. I've used it on road and off for about 6 seasons. I've never lost a stud. They get alot of grip. I'm very careful if I need to ride on dry pavement with them tho'.
    Aerostich suggests studding every other knob, thereby taking advantage of the studs on ice, and the rubber on dry or wet roads. Kind of a trade off for the best traction in different conditions. I put one stud in each knob on the rear tire and that was almost 100 studs.
    I've always used ice screws in the front tire.
    This year, I'm going to stud up both ends of my DRZ using Aerostich's 'every other knob' system.
    I think WER sells 'grip studs' too. Same product as far as I can see.
    #17
  18. AKDuc

    AKDuc Alaska Born Ducatisti

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    Randy, you been winter riding long enough that I thought you had it all figured out. :D

    I've never thrown any of my auto studs either but have heard of Aerostich being thrown.

    I've totally been amazed with the performance of one car stud per knob in Kenda Trackmasters. Six good scratches in the ice when I stomp on the rear brake and enough rubber on the pavement that I've always felt confident out on the highway. Maybe part of it is the great geometry of the KLR, eh?!? :lol3 Tell you what tho, I am glad I only have 37hp so my wheelspin is very controllable. I've not laid it down accidentally in 4 winters with the front always holding and the rear kicking out very predictably.

    Randy, I suggest doing what we've done up here. Have a tire studding party where folks can come over and practice drilling on a test tire and maybe contribute towards a gun or studs. There are always some used stud guns up for sale in the Fall and winter up here.

    Good luck and have fun, Mark H.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #18
  19. DC2wheels

    DC2wheels Castle Anthrax troll

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    I like the snowman. Is that your good luck charm to ward off evil snowplow drivers? :rofl
    #19
  20. atomicalex

    atomicalex silly aluminum boxes

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    A small but apparently non-functioning part of my brain is suddenly thinking this is a good idea.

    *added to the list of reasons to grab a little dirt bike!
    #20