Take The Wrong Way Home, Iran 2017

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Harti, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. Harti

    Harti Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    244
    Location:
    Berlin
    Hi Art,

    that's exactly the plan. I took the HP2 to Ireland earlier this year and now to Iran. 20.000 mls. on the clock and in great shape... Stored in my garage I let her age to perfection...
  2. Harti

    Harti Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    244
    Location:
    Berlin
    This is our hardware.

    Helis BMW F 800 GS

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    F 800 GS: Weight: 500 pounds
    Fuel consumption: 56 mpg - 4,2 l/100 km
    Fuel capacity: 4.5 gal - 17 l
    Range: 250 mls - 400 km

    Heli did not need extra gas containers...

    Martinas BMW F 650 GS

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    F 650 GS: Weight: 460 pounds.
    Fuel consumption: 67 mpg - 3.5 l/100 km
    Fuel capacity: 4.2 gal - 16 l
    Range: 250 mls - 400 km

    Martina had two little containers with 0.4 gal of gas in her side bags, just to be on the safe side...

    And my BMW HP2

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    HP2: Weight 440 pounds.
    Fuel consumption: 46 mpg - 5.1 l/100 km
    Fuel capacity: 3.4 gal - 13 l
    Range: 140 mls - 225 km

    I had two 1.3 gal jerrycans on board. But I needed only one. If at all, our gas problems were selfmade by our own miscalculations...

    Gas was way cheaper than in Germany. Georgia 2.50 $ per gallon, Iran 80 ¢ per gallon. Like back in the 80s...

    We checked the oil level every other day. We didn't notice any consumption whatsoever over 4.000 mls. Just out of old habits I put 1 quart in over time...

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    Heli dropped his bike a few times. Nothing serious. Only once he rear-ended my bike and crashed. The fall looked spectacular, but was harmless in the end.
    The battery connectors came lose. That caused a few wrinkles on his forehead. But the problem was soon found and eliminated for good.

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    Martina had driven her bike into a ditch. Also no harm. Only one plastic hook of a pannier broke off and had to be fixed by a strap.
    The mount for the two retracting springs of the side-stand broke off and had to be repaired temporarily by wire.

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    My side-stand came lose. Fixed on the go.
    In Kurdistan with all the winding roads I had a total rear break failure. Scary. Luckily I had a spare set of break pads with me and changed them in 15 minutes.
    I experienced from time to time difficulties to start when in gear with the clutch lever pulled. No problems when in neutral. Now, back in Germany, the problem is gone. Weird...

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    We opted for the Continental TKC 70. These tires were excellent onroad and good enough offroad. Only on mud we felt a little insecure, but I guess that's normal...

    For how we treated the bikes I must say, they did a great job with only insignificant glitches...

    Let's have a look at our Iranian bike competitors.

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    A Gold Wing as a decoration in a store.

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    He gets at least serious attention when needed...

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    I wonder, why BMW doesn't offer this design for the HP2...

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    Another "horny" bike...

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    Airfilter... overrated...

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    As long as the bike works...

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    Lights... also overrated...

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    You can't lock 'em though...

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    Iran has an upper limit of 200 cc. No wonder people are attracted by foreign bikes from the moon...
    Ccceric, yamalama, chudzikb and 3 others like this.
  3. Harti

    Harti Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    244
    Location:
    Berlin
    Folks,

    this is going to be my last post on Iran. I'll be around though for any questions or suggestions.

    I just want to talk about money and make some final remarks.

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    This calculation is for one person.

    We started with 2,500.- € cash. US $ would have been also fine, but we had only €.
    Our credit cards were useless in Iran, but were often used in Azerbaijan, Armenia and Georgia for gas and accommodation.

    We paid for the Iran visa agency: 306.- € - 361.-$.
    Visa Azerbaijan: 20.- € - 23.60 $.
    Int'l driver's license: 15.- € - 17.70 $.
    Int'l registration: 11.- € - 13.- $.
    Passport photos: 20.- € - 23.60 $.
    Carnet de Passage: 210.- € - 247.80 $.

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    Domestic bike transport to the shipping company: 113.- € - 133.- $.

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    Bike transport round trip Germany to Georgia : 1,490.- € - 1760.- $.

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    Flight ticket roundtrip Berlin - Tbilisi: 289.- € - 341.- $.

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    Accommodation for 42 nights: about 600.- € - 708.- $.

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    Gas: about 200.- € - 236.- $.

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    Food, pocket money, souveniers, entrance fees...: 420.- € - 496.- $.

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    Bike pick-up from the shipping company: 120.- € - 141.60 $.

    So this trip was in total: 3,570.- € - 4,213 $.

    And that's really not bad for a wonderful trip to a very remote area off the beaten track.

    As much as I critizise political systems and individual citizens for their sometimes absurd behaviour... I still like to go to these countries where I find mostly good people. The one's that are interested in progress, humanity, objectivity and impartiality, prosperity in a good way for all, not the brutal capitalism, where a few benefit and the supressed mass is at a disadvantage. It drives me to compare a cliche of a country or a religion or a lifestyle with what personal experiences I make.

    See for yourself and live to tell the truth.

    Thank you for watching.

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    Hans Petter, Herman1, DavidM1 and 9 others like this.
  4. Muncle

    Muncle Been here awhile

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    Pacific NW
    Thanks for sharing ,
    Your views of a country and the people were very informative to this NW American.
    Thanks for breaking it down into areas of interest and going into a bit more detail.
    Excellent ride report.
  5. chudzikb

    chudzikb Been here awhile

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    Thank you for taking the time to write this up and so thoroughly document your trip. Sadly, most of us in the U.S. will never get the chance to do such an amazing trip. But, viewing it through your camera and prose is a great second. And for that we thank you!
  6. X Banana Boy

    X Banana Boy stuck in the office

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    Loved following your trip. Thanks for the great report and pics!!
  7. enduro Dan

    enduro Dan Sticks and Stones™..

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    You might want to ditch that visa photo
    Your passport number is clearly visible.
  8. Harti

    Harti Been here awhile

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    Thanks Dan.
  9. de crowe

    de crowe de crowe

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
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    ireland
    thanks for all of that, definitely food for thought.
  10. young1

    young1 Long timer

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    We travelled with a small group in Iran for three weeks in October. The other 7 with us were all in UK passports so it can be done.

    Kiwi Mike
  11. Harti

    Harti Been here awhile

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    Did you roam Iran by bike? And how did you get them there? I don't assume you rented them there as they don't allow big bikes in the country...?