Tasmania - A lap of the Apple Isle

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by bull600, May 19, 2015.

  1. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    489
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Intro

    Back in January 2012 I was fortunate to ride a lap around Tassie with my great mate Paul on our trusty DR 650's. Although we had to contend with some atrocious weather we had a fantastic time and planned to one day come back to relive the experience. (A ride report of that trip can be found here)

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    Unfortunately, life threw us one of those curve balls and later that year Paul was diagnosed with an aggressive brain tumor which, within in 6 months, had cost him his life. Such a sudden an unexpected event like this makes one re-evaluate their priorities and getting away on bike trips became foremost in the minds of those who knew Paul well.

    So, with the highlights of the first trip still fresh in my mind another mate Russell and I planned a Tassie sojourn for April 2014. With planning underway in late 2013 it soon became apparent that a collapse of a section of the Western Explorer and its subsequent extended closure

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    would impede our trip a little, so we changed plans and headed to the Victorian/NSW High Country instead (a ride report of that trip can be found here)

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    Fast forward to 2015 and our plans were back on track for a return to Tassie in April. As Russell had missed our first trip due to work commitments we decided to follow a similar route as before as it was all new to him. It would incorporate basically a one way loop around the island with around 2800kms planned over an 11 day period.

    I'll try and incorporate lots of photos, maps and even some video of our trip!

    Prep and Transport (Day 1)

    To save time we trailered the bikes to Melbourne which meant getting things organised a few days before our Saturday departure. Except for a late minute spare tyre hassle with the trailer, loading and securing the bikes went without a hitch a few nights before we left. The only adjustment we had to make was removing my mirrors to get the bikes under the carport.

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    Ready to roll..

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    It wasn't long before we hit the road early Saturday morning, only to find heavy fog as we passed through Murray Bridge and Tailem Bend

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    As is our custom, the bakery at Bordertown was our first port of call

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    It was then pretty well non stop to Melbourne where once again our mate Dave put us up for the night. Now on our last trip over my camelbak had leaked 3 litres of water all over the bed while staying with Dave so this year when I opened the door to the bedroom I shouldn't have been surprised to find this

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    I guess he didn't want to take any chances this time :lol3:lol3

    Soon the bikes were loaded up and ready to go

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    So we sat back and watched the footy for the rest of the afternoon, ready for our departure to the Apple Is in the morning.

    Day 2

    The quiet Sunday morning traffic was a godsend as we left bright and early and headed down to Station Pier

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    Where our ride across Bass Strait, Spirit of Tasmania 2 was waiting

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    This time round the quarantine inspection occurred on the mainland and we had forgotten that gas cylinders (even the small disposable ones) had to be declared and stowed away by the crew. Luckily ours were within easy reach and we were soon past the checkpoint and into the bowels of the ship. Right on 9am we left the skyline of Melbourne in our wake and began the 9 hour sail to Devonport in Tasmania

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    For the trip over the ship provides plenty of entertainment, including bars and a restaurant but we decided to chill out and watch some footy replays away from the crowds

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    Of course once lunch came around we indulged in the stuff your face buffet but at $31 it was getting a little pricey :eekers:eekers

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    The day was perfect for sailing with hardly a breath of wind and flat seas

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    Then finally, as the sun began to set, we made our way past the breakwaters and up the mouth of the Mersey River into Devonport

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    The mad scramble to the bikes was soon undertaken and after waiting to pick up our gas cylinders we were off.

    By now it was dark and with a waypoint for a bush camp about 10kms out of town on the Mersey River from last trip loaded in the gps we headed off. Then, just as we came to the highway, I made the cardinal gps sin of having two tracks visible at the same time and in the confusion was soon heading up the wrong road :baldy:baldy

    After finally getting off the highway at the nearest exit we then stuffed around for another 10 minutes before finally getting our bearings and picking up River Rd towards Latrobe.

    The dirt track that led to the river was soon upon us and we then dodged potholes, puddles, wallabies and possums until finally landing at camp.

    Luckily, we had brought a few supplies and once the tents were up we settled down for a quiet ale by the fire

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    Link to Map of Day 2


    To be continued...
    #1
  2. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Day 3

    After a chilly night where the temperature dropped to -1.7 degrees it was nice to get a fire going as the sun came up on our first morning in Tassie

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    The Mersey River was at our doorstep and the forecast was for a clear and fine day

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    Our first task was to head into the small township of Latrobe to stock up on a few supplies before heading west.

    Of course before we did that we made the obligatory bakery stop

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    and then looked to grab some fresh food for the night. Although these seemed to be all the rage

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    We settled for some fat scotch fillets (from the friendliest butcher I think I’'ve ever met) and some Boags Draught, that soon went into the esky

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    On my previous trip we had travelled the bitumen tourist route along the edge of the northwest coast so this time the plan was to zig zag west staying on the minor roads/tracks that run parallel to the coast.
    Soon we were on the road first passing over River Forth and then stopping for a view of the Wilmot River at Alma Bridge

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    Before heading up Geales Rd towards the Leven River Valley

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    The country side was green and the traffic sparse as we wound our way west

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    Picking up South Riana Rd

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    Which ran over the Levan River

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    and up past the George Woodhouse Lookout

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    where a great view out over the valley could be had

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    From there we wandered over past Hampshire and crossed the A10 (that leads down to Hellyer Gorge) before hitting the dirt and taking Takone, Farquhars, Pruana and finally Bird Road.

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    Once we hit the intersection with Keith River Road we decided to take a quick detour left down to check out the Arthur River

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    We found a nice little spot to park the bikes

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    and then checked out the river, that was impressive at this point

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    A little further along Keith River Rd headed right down and finished at the water but the exit on the other side wasn’t very obvious. It would be a great place to explore if more time was available :wink:

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    After a snack for lunch by the river we loaded up and soon found our way to the Newhaven Track that then led to Rabalga Track.

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    Our plan was to visit Dip Falls so when reached the junction with Rabalga Rd we turned north through the forest

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    It was then only 5kms to the rather unusual falls on the Dip River where the water cascades over a series of cubic basalt rocks

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    After wandering around the falls for a while we realised that finding a camp was our next main objective. I had entered a possible bush camp waypoint in the gps from the WikiCamps app that was further north off Mawbanna Rd.
    The description indicated that the camp was found right after fording the shallow Black River. Once we reached the river we went for a look

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    and found a section that was shallower slightly downstream

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    So, off we went!



    What a cracker of a campsite it turned out to be!! A wide, flat grassy area where someone had even left some wood, and it wasn’t long before the tents were up and the fire was going

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    It was when I ventured down to the river edge sometime later to get some water that I came across one of the more disgusting things I’ve seen for a while.

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    Yep, that’s right… not 2 metres from the river someone had taken a dump and left it all there for the world to see (and smell). Unbelievable :nah:nah .

    I couldn’t bear the thought of it so I ended up digging a hole and burying it. I must say the task of burying a shit is more difficult when it’s not your own..

    After chasing the little wrens around for a photo

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    We got to work getting those Scotch Fillets cooked just right

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    And what a feast it was :clap:clap

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    A great end to our first full day on the road :1drink

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    Link to Map of Day 3


    To be continued...
    #2
    Ramdog likes this.
  3. Not the Messiah

    Not the Messiah Not the Messiah

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2013
    Oddometer:
    676
    Location:
    Melb'n, 'Straya
    Yeah, how good is this, eh?
    My turn in Feb '16, can't wait.
    And looking forward to the rest of yours!

    Nice work, thanks for posting it all up.

    Cheers
    Brian L
    #3
  4. TerryK

    TerryK Ulysses

    Joined:
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    1,903
    Location:
    adelaide South Australia
    Good to see ya back out Greg, missed the RR's

    Cheers Terry
    #4
  5. masterbrewer

    masterbrewer TDMster

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2005
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    3,087
    Location:
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Good work Greg, :thumb life goes riding on.
    #5
  6. TheDecepticon

    TheDecepticon Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2014
    Oddometer:
    442
    Location:
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Tassie is a beaut spot, looking like you enjoyed it. :D
    #6
  7. Mcgee

    Mcgee Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2011
    Oddometer:
    608
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    Tassie looks like a great place to be! Thank you for letting us ride along and see some great country. Looking forward to more of your trip.
    #7
  8. Goosefeather

    Goosefeather Captain Slow

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    985
    Location:
    Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    Looks great.

    Shame about the s*&t, but good on you for cleaning up after the wan*&rs. :clap
    #8
  9. jtb

    jtb Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2003
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    2,378
    Location:
    Hawkesbury NSW Australia
    Hell yeah! :clap:clap:clap

    Keep 'er comin'!:evil
    #9
  10. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    6,911
    Location:
    SW Victoria Oz
    NTM can I come too?

    I look forward to the rest of this RR Greg.
    #10
  11. Not the Messiah

    Not the Messiah Not the Messiah

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2013
    Oddometer:
    676
    Location:
    Melb'n, 'Straya
    For sure!
    But the "main event" is the Ulysses AGM, so you'll have to pretend be one the Disgracefully Aged - your youthful good looks might be an issue.

    Cheers
    Brian
    #11
  12. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    489
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Day 4

    With camp packed away and breakfast done we crossed Black River once more

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    and headed back past Dip Falls around a kilometre to the check out the ‘Big Tree Reserve’. With logging such an intrinsic part of Tasmania’s history the preservation of some of these giant trees is important and always worth a look.

    In this case the tree is a grand example of Eucalyptus oblique (commonly known as the Browntop Stringybark) that stands around 62mt tall and has a base circumference of 16mt. It’s thought to be up to 400 years old.

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    After leaving the forest reserve we headed south and picked up where we had turned off yesterday. The plan was to head over to Smithton as we would need fuel before the next supply at Zeehan.

    This involved a traversing a number of tracks and junctions, some in good condition

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    Others a little more off beat

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    That led to some slippery sections

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    While others couldn’t decide if they were open or not :lol3

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    At one point we passed through a logged area that showed remnants of where some of the giant trees had once stood

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    It was then onto Wedge Plains Rd

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    Before we meandered our way through open farmlands towards Lileah and Irishtown

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    With no standard unleaded available we topped up with premium once we reached Smithton

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    Before heading to the 2 most important places in town. The bakery

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    And the bottle shop

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    In fact this bottle shop had the dubious honour of selling us the most expensive beer of the trip - $42 for a dozen cans :eekers:eekers. For an extra 4 bucks we could have got a carton - pity we had nowhere to put them:cry
    (Editor’s note: the next time we found ourselves in this situation later in the trip we found a way to stash the other dozen :wink:)

    From Smithton we headed back south through Roger River and Trowutta and then picked up what is known as the Tarkine Drive

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    This section of the Tarkine Drive known as the South Arthur Forest Drive has seen the road upgraded (bituminised on the section we travelled) with new bridges over the Arthur and Rapid Rivers. This drive had been closed on my last trip due the damaged bridges so it was good that it had reopened… or so we thought. 20 minutes down the road from the turn off we came across a ‘Road Closed’ sign and workmen excavating a section of road

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    Fortunately for us after a bit of a chat one of the guys in charge went and had a word to the plant operator who laid down a little sandy path for us to get through on

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    Thanks guys :clap:clap

    The new road, as you would expect, was in great shape and even had lots of new signs to help try and protect the endangered wildlife

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    Not long after the new Rapid River Bridge

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    We turned off to visit Lake Chisholm, a flooded sinkhole that lies in the forest

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    It was in the carpark that we saw the first sign of anyone else travelling this area …and they were on a bike :lol3

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    The short loop walk through the forest leads to the lake

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    After a stroll around we headed back to the Tarkine Drive, passing the Julius River Reserve that provides tables and BBQ’s

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    It was then on to the Sumac Lookout

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    Which provides a great view of the Arthur River in the distance

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    From there it’s just a short drive down the hill to the Kanunnah Bridge that was replaced after being washed away a number of years ago. This is a really great spot to see the Arthur River in all its glory

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    The bridge is also the junction of Sumac and Blackwater Rd, so we turned left and headed down the latter towards the beginning of the Western Explorer. This road (C249) has a bit of a reputation for some reason but is basically a good quality gravel (silica) road that winds its way south to Corinna.

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    Although much of it travels through more open country there are sections that pass through the rainforest

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    And both the Donaldson and Savage rivers are crossed

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    The total distance to Corinna is only 78km from the turn off but we took our time and made a few stops, so it took a couple of hours

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    As we closed in on Corinna I found the turn off to a bush camp I had used on a previous trip. Now, on the last trip the track was rather overgrown

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    But this time it was worse. So much so that I had to get off and walk to see if it even was the right track. After being sure I was going in the right direction it all became a fruitless exercise when I was confronted with a large washaway



    As it was now getting late we decided to cut our losses in this overgrown part of the forest and went back a km or so to another waypoint I had sourced from ‘4WD Tracks of Tasmania’ by Chris Boden. The book is an excellent resource but there is also a CD that can be purchased that has over 600 waypoints for Tassie including Bush Camps, Picnic areas, Caravan Parks etc.

    We soon found a short track off the main road that led to a small cleared area that, despite a load of rubbish in a used fireplace, was perfect for our needs. Camp was soon up and running and there was no shortage of freshly cut wood :wink:

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    Unfortunately, there were no steaks tonight. Rather, our kitchen log was set up to heat up freeze dried meals (and yes a shit load of pepper is needed :lol3)

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    And some tins of soup

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    We were then able to use the ample wood supplies to warm the place up

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    And enjoy those expensive beers :1drink

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    Link to Map of Day 4


    To be continued..
    #12
  13. XRman

    XRman Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2006
    Oddometer:
    6,911
    Location:
    SW Victoria Oz
    That could be a problem!:rofl

    The BMW1200 is going with you?
    #13
  14. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    489
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Day 5

    Generally one of the first tasks undertaken after breakfast is the decision about where one might find a spot for a ‘number two’. On this particular morning I wandered into the forest, shovel and paper in hand, and blow me down came across this hidden in a thicket of trees 50 mts or so from camp.

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    Who put it there and why were far from my mind as I began the day in comfort (and my knees were for every thankful:lol3)

    Once packed it was only a short ride into the tiny hamlet of Corrina, which is nestled on the Pieman River. It is a beautiful stretch of water, surround by forest

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    The road south continues over the river and the journey across is on the famous ‘Fat Man Barge’

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    At $12.50 a pop it’s not the cheapest form of transport

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    But is unique all the same.

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    Once over the river it was 12km run until we came to the intersection with Pieman Rd (C252). Lake Pieman, that was created when Reece Dam was completed back in 1987, lay about 5km off to the east along C252 so we decided to take a spin out and have a look.

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    The road runs across the wall of Reece Dam

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    and gives a bird’s eye view of the power station at its base

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    As well as the upstream lake created by the dam

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    Once we had back tracked we picked up Heemskirk Rd once again and headed south towards Zeehan. Now, on my previous trip, Zeehan had been a place of few highlights.

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    Looking pretty tired and run down it is hard to imagine that this town was once Tasmania’s third largest but two things had been worthwhile on my last visit here -The Spray Tunnel and the local hamburgers. So, after wandering around trying to find the right road, we eventually made it up to the disused train tunnel which had once formed part of the nearby Spray Mine complex

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    Now, the ‘Cribb Hut Zeehan’ may not look like much

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    But I can assure you that this place makes one of the best hamburgers available anywhere:evil

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    The proof is in the eating:rofl

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    With a guts full of food we flopped back on our bikes and headed off to refuel. No fancy service stations in Zeehan just the unmanned, pay by card before you fill arrangement

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    With fuel on board our next stop was to the turn off to the track into Montezuma Falls. It lies about 10km out of town on the Murchison Hwy (A10) but when we got there we were disappointed to find the track in was closed due to repairs

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    Needless to say we were both a bit pissed, as both the falls and the track in were highlights on my last trip

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    There was nothing we could do as the sign indicated that the workmen were still in there (no sneaking in…) so we headed off on the way Strahan.
    Just before the main road crosses the Henty River there is a lookout that gives a nice view of the coast in the distance

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    Strahan is a popular and pretty town where tourism is flourishing. It lies on the edge of the Macquarie Harbour, where both the King and Gordon Rivers end.

    As well as the picturesque bay

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    Where many tourist and working boats moor

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    It also boasts one end of the West Coast Wilderness Railway

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    This iconic track runs from Strahan to Queenstown and includes the ABT Rack and Pinion section of track that enables the original steam locomotives that travel this tourist route to traverse steep section of the line

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    A spit and polish before the afternoon journey

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    The other part of Strahan that we wanted to have a look at was the ocean beach, 6km out of town. A fairly easy entry allows access to the hard packed beach

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    After playing in the sand for a while we then hit the road for Queenstown, that lay 40km up the Lyell Hwy (B24).

    The dark clouds gathered as we approached the valley where Queenstown lies

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    with some washing and chores to do we decided to head for the caravan park and the comfort of a unit for the night

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    We decided to head into town for a meal and found it almost deserted. The main pub had recently closed so we opted for a pizza

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    Which turned out to be bloody good:clap

    Link to Map of Day 5

    To be continued..
    #14
    MadRider777 likes this.
  15. Coffeeman

    Coffeeman Coffeeman

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2014
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Reading, UK
    Around a little seen part of the world from up here. Thankyou.
    #15
  16. davesupreme

    davesupreme grand poobah

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
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    3,971
    Location:
    palm harbor, fla
    now i wanna go!.... :1drink
    #16
  17. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    489
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Day 6

    Our decision to opt for the cabin was a wise one as the heavens opened up overnight. We went looking for a cooked breakfast but none was on offer so we headed west on the Lyell Hwy towards Derwent Bridge.

    The first section of road out of Queenstown winds steeply up the hill with a lookout perched above the valley about 4kms out of town. It gives a bit of an insight into the history of the area and shows how the Mt Lyell mine had such a huge impact on the environment

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    Over time there has been a gradual re-vegetation of the area but with the mines ultimate closure late in 2014, the town is now in mortal decline

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    Not far past the lookout a turn off to the left down Iron Blow Rd leads to a brand new lookout platform high over the Old Iron Blow Mine site, which is now full of water

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    We soon headed off away from the scarred landscape towards Lake Burbury which was formed with the construction of Crotty Dam. The Highway crosses the lake at one point and gives a good view on either side of the road

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    A little further on a short road leads in to a camping area and boatramp

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    From there it’s not far until the Franklin-Gordon Rivers National Park boundary is reached

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    This whole area, made famous by the an epic conservation battles back in the 1980’s to save area from dams being constructed on the rivers, is traversed only by the Lyell Highway that cuts through its centre.

    The area is rugged (and cold!) with views of the surrounding landscape available at various spots along the way

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    The Franklin River is crossed about 36kms from the park boundary

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    where there is a carpark, signage and track that leads down to the river’s edge

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    After a short stroll some final information about the area can be found

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    Before the river is reached

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    Our next stop was for a fuel top up and some lunch at ‘Hungry Wombat Café’ at Derwent Bridge.

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    As well as a haven for bushwalkers who had returned from the 65km Overland Track (that runs from nearby Lake St Clair through to Cradle mountain), it also had an impressive ’64 Falcon Squire in the carpark :wink:

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    About 20km past Derwent Bridge and just out of the park we turned south down the gravel of Fourteen Mile Rd. A few kms further on we found sign to Laughing Jack Lagoon (lucky we knew where it pointed :lol3)

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    The plan was to take a run into the lagoon and then loop out via some forest tracks. The first thing we noticed was the classic wood stave pipeline that ran alongside the track

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    Once at the lake we rode over the rocky dam wall

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    And had a look around but it was windy and cold with the breeze coming off the lake

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    After eventually working out which of a number of possible tracks we needed to take we were greeted with this

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    The newly reinforced gate had stopping motorbikes in mind

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    We probably could have gotten through but decided it wasn’t worth the effort (especially if there was one at the other end) so back-tracked to the Fourteen Mile Rd intersection.

    Once at the end of Fourteen Mile Rd we picked up the Lyell Highway once more and topped up again with fuel at Ouse as there would be no more fuel available for some time.

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    Not far out of Ouse we turned off on Ellendale Rd and then again onto Gordon River Rd on our way through to Maydena

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    As it was getting late in the day we began scouting for possible camps and found what looked like a promising spot, blocked by boulders, just off the main road

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    After a bit of sniffing around we soon found a way in

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    And discovered another fantastic camping spot

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    It didn’t take long to the get the camp up and running

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    And dinner organised

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    As the night wore on it began to drizzle so we put up the shelter and settled in beside the fire

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    Link to Map of Day 6

    To be continued…
    #17
  18. Dr3amin

    Dr3amin n00b

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
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    6
    Location:
    South Western Australia
    Nice to see some good photos of my old stompin grounds on the west coast guys. It certainly is a beautiful part of the world!
    #18
  19. tundradirtbiker

    tundradirtbiker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
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    607
    Location:
    Oregon City
    :clap Cool RR
    #19
  20. bull600

    bull600 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    489
    Location:
    Adelaide South Australia
    Day 7

    As we had sat at camp the previous evening we noticed that there was a constant stream of logging trucks running back and forward on the road nearby. One particular truck had seen our fire as he passed and given his horn a workout.


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    The problem was (for Russell at least) that every time he passed for the rest of the night he gave us the same treatment - lucky I had my earplugs in :wink::wink:

    As the sun began poking through the trees we got a fire going to take the chill off the air



    Under the watchful eye of the locals

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    we packed up camp and headed off

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    No far from camp we came to the Styx Rd turnoff. This road follows the Styx River but has a locked gate preventing a through trip to Karanja on the Gordon River Rd. However, by following a maze of logging roads it’s possible to branch off Styx Rd some way down and head south towards the Huon River. That was our plan, but first we enjoyed the ride through the Styx State Forest

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    Where we stopped at the ‘Big Tree Forest Reserve’

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    And parked the bikes

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    From there it’s just a short walk through the forest to the first of several ‘Big Trees’. Unlike the previous ‘Big Tree’ we had visited near Dip Falls these trees were swamp gums (Eucalyptus regnans) and grew to an even more impressive size of 86mt +

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    After wandering around the forest for a while we set off again down Styx Rd. At one point we passed this sign

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    This was interesting on a number of points. Firstly, I always thought it was Tree Felling (not Falling) and secondly, as is so often the case with signs like this restricting access, there wasn’t a soul around to cut the trees down anyway.

    Soon we turned off Styx Rd onto a well maintained gravel road, with an eye out for logging traffic (did I mention there wasn’t a soul around)

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    By using the gps log from my pervious trip we then were able to navigate the maze of roads that ran through the forest

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    Before stopping for a break mid-morning

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    Eventually, after negotiating lots of intersections, we headed steeply downhill and met Lonnavale Rd not far out of Judbury. We wanted to continue south, with the ultimate aim of getting down to the southernmost point of Australia reachable by road – Cockle Creek.

    As we were taking ‘the back way’ we first turned on to Denison Rd and then Weld Rd until we crossed the Huon River

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    From there we tracked south through the forest picking up some of the Arve Rd Forest Drive, including a stop here

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    This had a track that led past some old steam equipment

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    and ended in a ‘lookout’

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    But I must have missed something because there was nothing to “look at”, just forest :eek1

    Once back on the bikes we picked up Bennetts Rd and then Esperence River Rd on our way south. At one point we spied a track heading off on our left towards the river so went to check it out


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    Sure enough the Esperence River, with a nice little campsite nearby, was found at the end of the track.

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    We still wanted to get down to Cockle Creek so we pressed on down Peak Rivulet Road until finally taking Darcy’s Link back onto the main highway not far north of Southport.

    With our hearts set on a nice big cooked lunch it was then a mad dash down the bitumen to try and make it to the Southport Tavern by 2pm. We arrived just in time :clap:clap


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    And it was worth the effort :evil


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    After lunch we refuelled and then wandered down the road a kilometre to check out the bay at Southport. It really was an idyllic spot on this wonderfully clear day


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    Complete with a picturesque little boat ramp


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    Now, you might think that a little slice of this paradise is beyond your financial reach. Think again

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    You just need somewhere to put it :lol3:lol3

    After enjoying the sights for a while we backtracked past the tavern to the main intersection and took Lune River Road, heading south once more. It was a perfect day, with flat seas and the ride along this section of coast was memorable. We passed by Moss Glen which sits on Recherche Bay



    Before making our way to the tiny hamlet of Cockle Creek


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    Which lies along the edge of Rocky Bay


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    We would have liked to have camped along here but the sites were either taken up by ramshackle semi-permanent types


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    Or were water logged bogs


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    So, we decided to head back to Southport and try our luck at the campground (which just happened to be next door to the tavern :wink::wink:)

    As luck would have it the place was empty so we had the pick of the sites and chose one close to the creek

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    It wasn’t long after setting up camp that Russell discovered he’d had an unexpected guest with him

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    The leech had attached itself to his calf and gorged itself all day :rofl:rofl

    Link to Map of Day 7

    to be continued..
    #20