Technical TAT Difficulties

Discussion in 'Americas' started by WV4Life, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. WV4Life

    WV4Life WV4Life

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    I am working through the logistics on some TAT issues. I hope to do the trip, perhaps only the eastern section, with a buddy in the summer of 2018 but have already started preparing. I live in WV and will pick up the trail in northern VA. Bike and gear are not a problem. I am going to uncharted technical territory though. I plan to get a GoPro to record the majority of the trip and am trying to figure out the technical logistics. I am wondering if there is a proven set up for filming. I am thinking GoPro mounted to helmet being powered by a portable charger so the charge is never an issue. I plan to get a pass through portable charger so it can power the camera and be charged by the bike at the same time with no lapse in power. We will likely stay at a motel every third night for hygiene or a campground with facilities where everything can be fully charged by 120v outlet.

    The next issue is file sizes. I have figured a 64GB drive can hold about 8hr and 42min of 1080p (30fps). So each night use a small Windows Surface tablet to pass the day’s footage to a terabyte hard drive and start over. Each 10 days could require just under 1TB of storage. So at a minimum a 2TB external hard drive.

    This is my crude planning. Please tell me where my flaws are if there are any based on experience. Certainly I will have to keep the portable charger dry which could at times be a problem. My luggage is Wolfman tank bag (not water-proof), a 1550 Pelican top case (water and smash proof) and Nelson Rigg side bags (water-proof but not smash proof). Tablet will be stored in top case. Portable charger will have to be in tank bag or on my person.

    Any help greatly appreciated.

    This is my first post so please be gentle. If anyone is in northern WV let me know. I know the good spots.
    #1
  2. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z Long timer

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    What do you plan to do with the footage? I guess I don't understand recording every mile.
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  3. WV4Life

    WV4Life WV4Life

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    I am trying to get bulk raw footage for several reasons (at least in my mind). First and foremost it's a once in a lifetime trip for me. I think the more footage I capture gives me a lot of footage to edit down. I'm sure there will be stretches of boring road but Ive been riding down these types of roads before and wish I had a camera recording for one reason or another. Secondly, I don't want to constantly be worrying about turning a camera on and off while riding as a distraction. And because its not an everyday route I don't know when the cool stuff is coming nor do I want to. I figure this would save me a lot of backtracking to capture footage of something I just passed with my camera off. The coolest stuff always happens when a camera is off.
    #3
  4. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Nobody will want to watch your endless helmet cam GoPro video, and even if edited down, a single POV (Point of View), even with compelling footage, will bore anybody. Move the GoPro around the bike and especially off the bike and capture yourself as you ride by. The more people in your videos, and by that I mean people you meet along the way and whose stories you tell, will be the true memories of the trip. You are making a grand mistake thinking you are doing something by just planning on sticking that camera on your helmet and recording every mile. Nobody, and I mean nobody, will watch that stuff. You won't either, and processing it will be a nightmare. You're much better off copying Tewster2 or even Motoventuring (Becky and Andrea), who recorded themselves and their reactions to their experiences and the people they met along the way. Sure, there was road footage in their epic trips, but it wasn't the mindless, endless stuff you have planned. And sure, helmet cam footage has its limited place, but what you're talking about is a bad idea. Get a lavaliere microphone for that GoPro and place it on a selfie stick and do some 360 "Alex Chacons" while narrating what you're seeing, what you're feeling, introduce us to whom you've met, tell us about the thrills, the spills, the doubts, the challenges and on and on. Again, and I guess you'll have to trust me on this, nobody but nobody is going to be interested in your endless, single POV helmet cam video.

    All the above was a prelude to this: even if the video is for yourself, you'll regret missing the opportunities I mentioned.

    Good luck.

    Examples:





    And the Grand Finale:

    #4
  5. phreakingeek

    phreakingeek adventurer

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    I started out the TAT last summer with the intentions of recording the trip...and quickly realized that there was plenty of work to do just getting gear packed/unpacked and meals made every day. So my little point and shoot camera ended up being my go-to. I did miss out on a few things that would have been pretty awesome video, but I decided that I liked when I slowed down and planned shots with an eye for content when I didnt have the video rolling. I stopped, made u-turns, and went back to get some shots. That made me a lot more aware and appreciative of what I was actually getting. I still ended up with a lot of pics (3000+)...and only half were worth keeping.

    If you want to record all of the riding, plan to have a few extra memory cards and batteries so you can swap them out at lunch. Charge and download video each night.

    I do like what was said earlier to add in other points of view. Get a few mounts so you can move the camera from head, to bars looking at you, to rear-view if you have a buddy following. That way you'll be able to piece together a nice video when you get back.
    #5
  6. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    This should cover it nicely:


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  7. WV4Life

    WV4Life WV4Life

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    Thanks guys for the different suggestions. I plan to use a microphone so there is vocals. I never stop talking in my helmet when i ride.

    Of course I will get someone to watch all of it. At different parts of the ride I will say what different kids get in the will .
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  8. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    :lol3

    (Of course another consideration is to spend your kids inheritance on more adventures for yourself. They'll be fine.)
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  9. wilsonjw42

    wilsonjw42 Long rider

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    The challenge I had on long rides was recording all of my thoughts as I rode along: being able to recall what I was thinking and doing while experiencing all of those great sights (and photographs).

    For several years, I was using a digital recorder mounted up by the left mirror, with a wire up to my helmet -- okay, but the wires were a hassle, and making sure that the recorder was running was difficult because the recorder light wasn't engineered for outdoor use during the day. For a long ride this past summer, I got a Sena Prism (which is integrated with the Sena 20S that I use every day). This was a great solution for capturing audio, and I got the video footage for nothing. The camera can be charged on the fly (either from the bike or an auxiliary battery in a jacket pocket), and I can get several hours of occasional video and audio notes on each battery charge and MicroSD card. Sena also makes a Bluetooth add-on for the earlier GoPro models so you can integrate audio with that video, if you're running with a Bluetooth headset.

    I primarily use a point-and-shoot camera, on a lanyard, that I stuff in the breast pocket of my riding jacket for stills. There are plenty of times I don't get the shot, but I don't have all the editing to do, either.

    I agree that a lot of footage will be a challenge to deal with -- I find it tedious to watch my own stuff.

    I've studied some of the great ride reports (and ride reporters) here, to get ideas. The best authors are those who weave stories and photographs together. Taking good photographs is also an art -- good equipment, but more importantly, good style and composition.
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  10. trailer Rails

    trailer Rails Washes hands before going to the bathroom

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    That sounds like a lot of work. Have you done this before on other trips? I had a go pro on my TAT trip and only turned it on now and again. Maybe a few minutes, once a day. You may end up concentrating on trying to get a good shot more than just enjoying the ride. I had a point and shoot camera on a lanyard around my wrist, then stuff the camera up my jacket sleeve. I could have that camera out at a moments notice.
    #10
  11. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer

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    IMHO if you shoot that much footage it will take you months to edit....when I ride I never shoot more than 2 gigs a day if that. I only turn the camera on for a few seconds or a minute at a time when I see something interesting. Yes, I may "miss"something", but the ride is for me and nobody else, I can always remember what I missed. You can visit my Youtube to see some of my vids. There is not a lot editing each clip as what you see in the vids is pretty much all I shot. The link is in my signature line. Have fun and enjoy the TAT.
    #11
  12. AdamChandler

    AdamChandler n00b

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    I may have stumbled on the right thread! Here are a few 3-18 hour youtube videos that no one has watched :p






    I used to mount the GoPro on the windscreen via a suction mount:
    [​IMG]

    In addition to that, run a TomTom Bandit on my helmet and keep a USB cord running down to my pocket where I keep a 20K MAH Power Pack from Anker. The GoPro would plug into my USB port in the bike. Both could charge while recording...but I've changed things up a bit since then but i'll get to that.

    Hardware you're going to need:
    • GoPro Hero 6 (It has stabilization. Which takes more battery life but makes the videos watchable. none of the clips above are with the Hero 6 but the one below this bullet list is and it was a huge change in the quality of my videos.
    • 128GB Class 10/U3 MicroSD Cards. Get 4 of them if you can afford it
    • Anker Power Pack 20K milliamp and get 2 of these as well
    • Basically, assume you can only sync / charge every 2 days
    • Get a USB port onto your bike that charges...lots of options
    • This GoPro Helmet mount is my favorite. Very stiff but allows a little bit of motion w/o having to get off your bike - https://shop.gopro.com/mounts/swivel-mount/ABJQR-001.html
    • I did a RAM Mount Claw GoPro Mount which I mount to the crash bars as a replacement to my suction cup situation...regrets. It's fantastic for Time lapse which is a great way to get b-roll on rides like the TAT but for video, every vibration is transferred to the claw and then to the camera
    • A Tube Mount / turn signal out is best. basically put the GoPro as connected to the bike as possible. Any arm that's more than 1" will have a slight jiggle to it and that will transfer to the video. Keep it as close to the bike as you can.
    • A 90 degree bend USB cable will allow you to get the GoPro on your helmet & charging w/o a cable sticking 6" away from your face - link
    • If you want to record audio: Adapter, Lavalier w/ clip + GoPro's Microphone adapter
    • You can leave the microphone plugged in full time. I clip mine to the inside of my Shoei at the breath / nose shield
    • oh and if you want to not run a power cable into the GoPro, these add weight but are handy.they double the battery life(which is still only 2 hours)
    • you’re going to need a bus-powered 2TB hard drive for a TAT ride..minimum Why bus powered? The surface powers it, not a wall jack so you can offload clips from the road w/o having to find a power plug. there are expensive HDs that allow you to dump SD cards onto them (like $400) that are used on film-sets. don’t bother until you’re seriously made of money. I want one of these but would rather spend other ways.
    • Alternatively to a USB plug or battery, I have this. I can keep it plugged into the bike's USB port so I'm always charging 2 of the 3 batteries.

    Hero 6 footage



    Ok...so logistics and again I'm not challenging IF you should record all of this video, only how to do it effectively. I enjoy having everything captured and I make highlights video where I take 6 hours down to 15 minutes of my favorite clips but I still save the 6 hours because it's fun to have it..no one needs that much video and they're going to get bored.

    What formats to use:
    4K @ 60FPS is fun but your'e going to fill up your SD card and you can't do Stabilization in this mode.
    4K @30FPS, blurry video since you're moving fast
    So I recommend 2.7K @ 60FPS + ProTune + Stabilization w/ a microphone plugged in at the top of your helmet opening so viewers can get engine noise & your voice cursing at rocks.
    1080P will not significantly improve the battery life over 2.7K and presumably you're plugged in all day anyway.
    Superview is the only angle I use even though it's a bit of fish-bowl affect
    Mount the GoPro on the front of your helmet or just off to the side. top-mounted looks dumb anyway but also is a weird angle. I made this for front recording:

    [​IMG]

    Sometimes people like a POV view so you could use a Claw mount on your handlebars to have a camera facing you as well..I've used it in videos like this:



    The problem though is post production syncing the clips up

    ----

    One final thought assuming you have battery and storage space, you're going to need to process all of this video. I prefer to do bits from the road but if your'e traveling with a friend, it's sometimes odd to lock yourself in a hotel room every day and edit for 4 hours. So better yet just do it all when you're home at a real PC w/ a large screen. Adobe Premiere is the editor of choice. I use Final Cut Pro as I'm a Mac user.

    Transcoding and analyzing 4K of video...3 hours worth takes about 2 hours on my Core i7 iMac w/ 32GB of RAM and a dedicated GPU. It takes about 2 hours to stabilize 30 minutes of 4K video. So if your'e going to shoot in 4K, you should have a very beefy computer. 2.7K will obviously be easier to edit.

    Please quote me or tag me if you have any more questions. I do 12K miles a year w/ a helmet attached to my bike. Have learned a lot. I'm a complete amateur at this.
    #12
  13. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    True point, and a pretty good, technical post above, however.....

    Most people reading this will never do any real editing and even more don't have the computing power to effectively process 4k video. Most probably couldn't tell the difference between 1080 (or even 720p) and 4K anyway. 4K isn't the solution for most people who aren't producing deliverables to the industry.

    A few, fast forward clicks on the above helmet drone videos just to get a flavor is all I did, as there was no connected, compelling story. Great memory material perhaps for personal review by the rider later on. About 1-3% of GoPro users do any regular, quality work with these devices.

    That said, if GoPro depended upon sales to people who actually put their cameras to good use, they would have gone out of business their first year. Many of the people who will buy the Hero 6 are already owners of an earlier model GoPro they never really use and most likely have never edited anything from.
    #13
  14. Dorito

    Dorito Dreamer and Doer

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    Have you considered how much extra time videography is going to take? For example, the extraordinary tale usually means riding up, setting up a camera on the ground somehow to frame the shot, then re-riding it. Really interesting vid includes multiple vantage points/cameras and maybe a drone.

    Do you want to spend you nights charging everything up, or kicking it at a campsite? Sounds trival, but day after day, you will tire and is it important to you? Not to mention that TAT is best ridden light. Add in extra batteries, extra cards, extra harddrives, you are going to suck up lots of space/weight.

    Are you passionate about vid editing? Are you efficient at it? Are you really good at taking notes enroute on the time stamps you want to edit?
    #14
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  15. AdamChandler

    AdamChandler n00b

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    OP, while very non-professional i found this guy's TAT adventure well done. Small clips at end of day recapping with a couple of helmet shots..5 minutes per day. Looks fairly painless:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6cAc7jaGgvGRRLmc_PgdbA

    @tricepilot - as I said, "no one needs that much video and they're going to get bored." + "I'm a complete amateur at this." I'm just answering OP's question about how they can record the whole time. It's not something they should do but they asked and that's my experience.

    Personally, I watch YouTube on a 4K Television w/ HDR and so yes I can see a huge difference between my 1080P movies and my 4K ones. It is a huge difference. Most people couldn't watch 1080P video when vloggers were putting out 480P /240P on YouTube. But 10 years later, 1080P is finally mainstream. I try to shoot and edit the highest resolution and bit-rate possible. I edit in AppleProRes HQ and upload these massive 50-100 gigabyte files to YouTube. They then take that and make 12 different versions with high and low bit rate files and serve up the best one to the viewer depending on bandwidth and screen size....and in a decade, my videos will still look good so it's something I personally care about. Maybe today on 1% of the people watch videos on a proper 65" 4K television at the right viewing angle and distance from the screen with enough bandwidth to actually discern pixels but this is where things are going and it's good to prepare yourself IF your computer can edit it.
    #15
  16. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer

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    Yep, when I look at at a vid and it's just trees going by I turn it off after a minute or so. Plus, and it's only MY opinion, bike mounted video is the most boring thing there is. Add some handheld, some narration, and different angles and it's great.
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  17. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Not that I know that the following is the best example, but it's as good as I've found:



    That's how you wrap video shot from a motorcycle with a story tortilla

    Most if not all of Tim's (Tewster2) YouTube/travel videos are on his page here
    #17
  18. tricepilot

    tricepilot El Gran Payaso

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    Don't take this personally because I haven't seen any of your videos. My only comment is someone could make IMAX quality movies but if they're not worth watching because of the many reasons already talked about here, nobody is going to care what the resolution is.

    Tony Nothrup talks about the idea in the following video as it relates to the DSLR:



    Casual readers here should plug "Red Weapon Helium 8K Camera" into the YouTube search box. Forget 4K, 8K is already here and who knows what will be on hand in 10 years.

    What won't change is the ballooning of the YouTube universe and probably more like it yet to be unveiled. The mistake people make is thinking more pixels = better. While equipment and technical specs have a niche, that niche is shrinking. Fewer and fewer are caring. Content is king. If you can't tell a story, techno is not going to save you.

    Welcome to the Instagram World. It better be short, sweet and interesting because nobody cares about 4K, they care about the brief 30 second chance they'll give your video. And it better be good.
    #18
  19. AdamChandler

    AdamChandler n00b

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    I deal with this daily. Luckily, I'm not trying to get anyone to look at my content. I do it for myself. I still use Flickr and shoot in RAW :p Cell phones don't handle my file sizes very well. it's a journal for me. For some reason, I'm making $300 a month on YouTube so that keeps me uploading despite not really having a huge audience.
    #19
  20. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer

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    I only edit and post my videos in 720p....the vids are only the story of MY ride and not intended to be some technical marvels. The human eye can only resolve so much detail but the mind can hold much more. Keep it simple and tell a story. If someone gets too wrapped up in the gadgets, specs, and trying too hard they'll miss the whole point....and that is the ride. But that's just me and I'm known to be a retard :lol3
    #20