Tent Heater?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Dan Alexander, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. DriveShaft

    DriveShaft Long timer

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    I suspect these catalytic heaters are based on the same premise as the old platinum catalyst jon-e hand warmers, or the re-vamped zippo hand warmers, based on the japanese version. I find the catalyst method can be really really efficient with their burn rate. One of those suckers in your sleeping bag, and it'll last all night on half a fill of fuel. It won't help the tent keep warm...but you'll be toasty in the sleeping bag.

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=276195
    #41
  2. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    ive been reading about these too.

    from reviews ive read, the zippo burns longer than the peacock or JonE heaters, but doesnt get as hot.

    also, replacement heating elements for the zippo dont seem to be available, at least they arent listed on the zippo site, and I cant seem to source them from vendors.

    Id like to try these too, I think 2 or 3 would keep me warm in my hammock in pretty low temps ( with an underquilt)
    #42
  3. DriveShaft

    DriveShaft Long timer

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    I picked up a jon-e and a couple zippos last year, and now I have a couple more zippos that I picked up this year too. They work great. Sometimes lighting them can get a little iffy--like you're not sure it actually lit and it snuffs out. And if you jostle it enough, you can get the catalyst cap to come off, thus ending your warmth, so they're not so good for banging around while skiing for example. But for the most part, I really like it for what it is.

    The zippos are identical to the peacock. In fact, they use the same catalyst caps. So, if you can get your hands on a peacock catalyst, you can use it with the zippo. I haven't bothered to find an outfit that supplies them, but I found this on the interweb...

    http://www.peacockhandwarmers.co.uk/index.html

    They (supposedly) last a real long time though, if you take care of them--like by not touching the catalyst pads.

    So far, I've been paying attention to light it in the blue part of the flame so that it doesn't get sooty on the pad. Not really sure if that helps, but I figure it couldn't hurt. I have had no problems with mine.

    The Jon-E's do burn hotter. But they also go through much more fuel, and smell more when you use them. The fuel pad and catalyst cap actually have an open air design, so it just gasses off freely...very inefficient. The japanese/zippo arrangement is sealed and capped completely forcing all the fuel to seep through the catalyst pads. Much more efficient...and very little likelihood of stories about fuel catastrophically igniting from over-filling and other disasters. :) The zippos are hot enough for what I use them for, so I'm happy with the longevity of the heat. I actually like to move my zippo around occasiionally, bcs it gets *too* hot for one area. The only folks I hear of u singthese are hunters who like to use them to keep their fingers warm in the blind, or those who throw them in their ATV handle-bar mitts to keep the mitts toasty in the winter.
    #43
  4. punk_emo_tx

    punk_emo_tx Been here awhile

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    I'm bored so i thought I'd post pictures of my XtremeCat.


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    #44
  5. rapidoxidationman

    rapidoxidationman Easily trainable

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    I've not read the whole thread, just the front page. I DO however have a bit of experience in this, having spent my first couple of summers in Jackson Hole living on the Snake River (back in '89/'90 you were allowed to do this).

    I had a cheapo K-Mart Hotel Grande wall tent and a coleman sleeping bag, along with a closed cell foam pad I stole from one of the quad chairlifts back at Jay Peak where I grew up. Livin' the dream, young and dumb, and I stayed warm.

    A coleman propane 2 mantle lantern is all you need. It'll give you light AND heat. Those 30* F mornings were pushed outside the tent walls in about 5 minutes by that light, making the inside comfy enough to get outside the sleeping bag with and get dressed. Propane also made it easy to warm up at night and get ready for bed.

    Burns clean, gives ya light at the same time. I wouldn't hesitate to do it again (and often do)...
    #45
  6. Deuce

    Deuce Crazy Canuck

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    Just keep a candle burning. You would be surprised how the temp difference it makes.
    #46
  7. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman PROUD 2B Riff Raff!

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    Kifaru... This is my 4 man tipi with medium stove...

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    The stove is very compact...
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    Words just do not do this system justice.
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    #47
  8. Benjava

    Benjava ?

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    Hey Angryscot, do you have one of these yet?:lol3
    #48
  9. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    what are the walls of the kirfaru tent made out of?

    it looks to be 2 layers, is it coated poly for the outer ( tarp) layer?

    I want to make one.

    also, whats the duration or burn time of those little stoves?
    \from reading the forums ( kifaru) they seem to reload the stoves like every half hour or so?
    #49
  10. Marvin the Martian

    Marvin the Martian Long timer

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    Madness takes its toll. Please have exact change
    Although, an old trick is to build two pit fires and bury the second one with a foot of soil then sleep on the top. Some of the truly woodsy types have confirmed this this method. I have a -20 bags and with added heat retention layers have been down near 0 F.
    #50
  11. peterman

    peterman cop magnet

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    candle powered tent heater.[​IMG]
    It can sit on the floor or hang from the ceiling, I use a 10 hour votive candle, light the candle when your turn in, and it burns all night long. I won't really heat the tent much, but does make a difference in the condensation from your breath in cold weather.[​IMG]
    The ends of the rods will get hot enough to melt nylon, so it needs to be kept away from sleeping bag, tent wall, etc.
    I also made a shorter, fatter version with the heating rods spaced closer together, and nearer to the top. The fatter one will hold a soup can, or coffee cup on top, and an extra row of holes around the top keeps the flame from being extinguished.
    #51
  12. Lobby

    Lobby Viel Spass, Vato!

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    Dood. :rolleyes

    Whether you're burning with a flame or with a catalyst, the chemical reactions are the same.

    Propane + oxygen --> CO2 + water

    And if there's a lack of oxygen:

    Propane + Oxygen --> CO (carbon monoxide) + water

    Either one will consume the oxygen in your tent. And either one will produce CO.

    Be careful out there.
    #52
  13. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman PROUD 2B Riff Raff!

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    And seeing these first hand I think they are great... I still want one :nod
    #53
  14. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman PROUD 2B Riff Raff!

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    The walls are silnylon I think... It has a liner that makes all the difference (it is an option)

    As far as the burn times, I can get 45 mins to an hour out of a stoked stove... plenty of time to turn in for the night. In the morning you can stick an arm out, stoke the fire and turn back in for a quick snooze, wake up in tee shirt weather and enjoy the morning while you get dressed... heat your coffee water at the same time then cook breakfast. Tipi life is good, VERY good :nod
    #54
  15. Little Bear

    Little Bear Just a guy, ya know?

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    Canadian Military on the western shore of Hudson Bay. It gets a bit chilly up there. You should see what you can do without a tent. Snow caves can be very warm.
    #55
  16. Thumpercrazee

    Thumpercrazee Long timer

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    :thumb :thumb
    IMHO this is the best and safest way to bring up temps in a small backpackers style tent. There are some enclosed candle lanterns which are very effective in lighting and providing some heat.
    They are the standard for backcountry trips in winter.

    TC:D
    #56
  17. MeanMoe

    MeanMoe one really mean cat

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    I heard this one yesterday. Hair dryer and an extension cord. It only works when camped at a campground with electricity available but there's no CO problem. :rofl
    #57
  18. WeeBee

    WeeBee Roaming ADV Gnome

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    Might work ok until one of your camp neighbors came over and beat your ass because of the noise :eek1
    #58
  19. Chico

    Chico Thief and Saboteur

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    How cold...?
    Hot rock at my feet stayed warm all night at about 15 F.
    #59
  20. seekerman

    seekerman LovinLife

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    If you're going to have a fire, line rocks around the fire pit and before going to bed dig an area out where you plan to sleep, put the hot rocks in this area and cover with at least 4" of soil. suggest you do this at the feet, torso, and head. You'll stay warm and toasty with no worries of harmful fumes. :wink:
    #60