Tentative

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by IrishHighViking, May 30, 2013.

  1. IrishHighViking

    IrishHighViking TBI Guy

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Oddometer:
    28
    Location:
    Holland
    Nervous as hell since getting back in the saddle. Having a hard time shaking it. Went down in Oct '10.

    [​IMG]

    How long has it taken some of you folks to shake the shakes?
    #1
  2. Islesfan91

    Islesfan91 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Oddometer:
    81
    Learned to ride in October 2011, crashed June 2012. Still think about it at times but it's not as bad. I was off the bike for a month and when I got back on it was a constant problem. I helped shake most of it by taking an advanced course, rebuilt the confidence and also spend a fair amount of time trying to figure out what I did that caused my crash so I wouldn't do it again (which was difficult, I hit my head and don't remember the actual crash)

    A course is a good way to build up your confidence, but without that, I just kept going out and riding, although for a while I would only ride in areas that weren't heavy traffic and spent a fair amount of time in parking lots working on low speed. It does take a while and there are still days when it's in my head as I'm gearing up, but thankfully once I'm on the bike it rarely enters my mind.
    #2
  3. atomicalex

    atomicalex silly aluminum boxes

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    3,212
    Location:
    Detroit mostly
    Give yourself time. That is all.

    Do you have a new bike (or a fixed old one) yet? If so, go out and address it. Spend some time around it. Sit on it a bit. Feel it. Then, when that feels ok, turn it on. Maybe you turn it off right away. Maybe not. But take time.

    What happened?
    #3
  4. Islesfan91

    Islesfan91 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2011
    Oddometer:
    81
    also take it slower than usual and don't expect to be back at your precrash level right away. I think the first few corners I took on the new bike were hilariously upright and very slow
    #4
  5. IrishHighViking

    IrishHighViking TBI Guy

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Oddometer:
    28
    Location:
    Holland
    Much like the gentlemen above me, I have no idea. Police report says it was late at night and I ran into a sign and then an embankment. I suffered retrograde and anterograde amnesia so the details are a mystery.

    I have a 2013 KLR now.
    #5
  6. IrishHighViking

    IrishHighViking TBI Guy

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Oddometer:
    28
    Location:
    Holland
    My drive from the dealer was in the pouring rain about 60 miles from home. I was doing 10 under and drawing quite an angry following. I seem to remember always being cautious in poor weather though. Wet tires scare me though I've never ridden anything with knobbys like the KLR. I assume they're better in the rain?
    #6
  7. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    9,900
    Location:
    Western Sierras
    Depends on the tires. There are all weather street tires that, when new, are better than most knobbies. In general, though, the knobbies allow the water to escape, avoiding hydroplaning.

    I too am ultra cautious on the wet pavement. If I would normally corner at 80% of my ability, I will only push 40% on wet, maybe less if it has been a while since the last rain.

    Since you have an off road capable bike now, how about doing some slow trail riding? Go put around on dirt roads at a relaxed pace. (do you have dirt roads where bikes can be ridden?) When that becomes comfortable, do the same in low traffic areas.
    #7
  8. Robert_W

    Robert_W Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    316
    Location:
    NW Montana
    My only real hard get off and tumble came after 20 plus years of riding and 1/4 million miles or more. Middle of no where by myself. Low sided at 35-40 mph. As they say could have been a LOT worse. Gear and a very nice old rancher with a come along saved my ass and my bike. Was able to ride out after an hour of getting the bike out of a ditch and some handy patchwork.

    I was very wigged out but forced myself right then and there to ride. Spent the next 3 hours VERY sore but in the saddle and letting my head clear. When I finally got back to civilization and a hotel I laid up for 2 days. Mostly from aches and pains. But I knew if I spent too long off it and analyzing the situation it wouldn't be good for my riding karma.

    If you can't clear your head...don't ride.
    #8
  9. echo15

    echo15 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Oddometer:
    397
    Location:
    Florida
    In '06 the rear brake pedal/shaft on my enfield worked loose, slid along the road until it caught on something and launched me face-first down the road at 55 :eek1. The gear did its job (thank you ATTGAT) though I did have a broken collarbone that now has a steel plate in it.
    Anyway like you, I have no memory or the time between knowing that something was REALLY wrong with the bike and looking up from the road and wondering why the clouds were going in circles.
    Now, to answer your question; for months after I was back on two wheels, I would have the sensation that something was wrong with the bike or I would hear a funny sound... More than once I stopped on the side of the road and checked everything out 'cause I was SURE something was amiss with the suspension or tires or whatever. I still, every once in awhile, have that feeling though nowhere near as strong. But for probably 6 months it was my daily companion.
    #9
  10. DirtReeper

    DirtReeper Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    507
    Location:
    Southern Utah
    Well Its a KLR and they LOVE dirt. go putt around in the dirt/ gravel for a bit at low speeds. that will help you out a bunch. Little to no traffic, and the ability to just stop when you want combined with dirt being softer that pavement will make for much increased confidance on the slab. and good on ya for getting back in the saddle. its just like riding a horse get back in the saddle as soon as you can, thats the best way to conquer the shakes.
    #10
  11. Fibzzz

    Fibzzz Resident Cynic

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    Oddometer:
    137
    Location:
    Bergen County, NJ
    I've been there. I had a serious crash in 2002, and went almost 10 years before getting another bike. And I'd be lying if I said I didn't still think about it every time I ride. But as others have said, the key is to just ride your ride. If your brain tells you to go a little slower, then you do it. The rust comes off, the nerves settle, the old reflexes come back, and the joy returns. Just be patient with yourself.

    If you want to read my story for a little perspective, you can find it here:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=819513&page=4

    Ride safe!
    #11
  12. IrishJohn

    IrishJohn Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2012
    Oddometer:
    71
    Location:
    St Louis MO
    Went down hard back home in Wexford in '79. Had to get back in the saddle right away as it was my only transport - but for months didn't 'enjoy' riding and ended up selling the bike and getting a clunker of a car. Bought a scooter six or seven years ago when my car was totalled by a crazy bich driving too fast on ice - couldn't afford a new car and hadn't time to look for a good used one so bought a scooter 'for a few months until I find a decent car' Rode white-knuckled and chicken winged for a month or two and kept it at 25mph - the break in speed. Gradualy relaxed and started to enjoy riding and remembering the good times on two wheels. Bought a car two years later but held on to the scooter until buying a TU250 last November. White knuckled and chicken winged until recently and kept her at half throttle - the break in speed. Am now thouroughly enjoying riding it while always keeping in the back of my mind that crashing from a bike HURTS. So - not as relaxed as I used to be way back before the initial accident - but a hell of a safer rider and able to enjoy the more subtle pleasures as a result. Take your time, don't pressure yourself to 'man up' or any of that bullshit and bottom line is figuring if the fear of riding outweighs the loss of pleasure if you decide its not for you any more, and only you can answer that. Slan a'mhaith a chairde ; )
    #12
  13. lineareagle

    lineareagle philomath

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    502
    Location:
    GTA
    I was looking for a new bike and bought it as soon as the insurance check arrived. I was still on my back with a leg in the air. It was another 2 months before I could go and pick it up.
    I was farkling it before I could ride it so learned every nook and cranny of it and I was planning trips before I could ride it as well.
    Having said that there is a healthy after accident mentality and an unhealthy one.
    Healthy is looking realistically at the sport, recognizing the hazards and the pitfalls and making decisions based on that. Like, type of bike, I went from an RT to a GSA knowing I would be riding slower and on byways not highways. Like skill set, do you need a refresher? Can playing on parking lots and away from traffic be sufficient?
    Unhealthy is denying the reality, pushing yourself and thinking you are the man. Buying more bike than you can handle and believing you can handle it.
    There is no doubt that I am aware that I have busted myself up on a bike every time I throw my leg over. No actually every time I am thinking about throwing my leg over, because now I evaluate whether it is right to ride before I decide to ride.
    Today for instance is a weekend, I was going to go to the club and thought, take the bike. Looked at my watch and I had 20 minutes to be there and it takes 15 to get there. I thought 5 minutes to pull the bike out, suit up and ride?
    Nope, not enough time to be in the zone.
    My zone is thorough bike inspection, suiting up unhurriedly and not being pushed for time EVER!
    So that is an example of being a realist. You can die and/or be maimed on a bike so you and only you have to be the one to eliminate that chance at every opportunity. If you can do that then getting back in the saddle is not a big deal, if you can't then pick another sport.
    #13
  14. sphyrnidus

    sphyrnidus born to ride

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Oddometer:
    135
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Hydroplaning is almost non existent with motorcycle tires. Hydroplaning happens when you have automobile tires which are flat.
    Knobbies are worse than road tires in bad weather, so that is no solution.

    On wet roads the capability of the tire is somewhat reduced. Like to about 80% of normal. If you already ride at 80% of your own capability, which is probably less than 80% of what your tires can handle, there is no need to slow down when it is wet.
    In the Netherlands it rails a lot, if you slow down all the time when it's wet you're not going to get anywhere on time :)
    It is wise to be careful after the first rain. But otherwise there's no real need to slow down.
    It might help to take an advanced riders course to build some self-convidence.
    #14
  15. duck

    duck Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2004
    Oddometer:
    10,403
    Location:
    Seattle (Berkeley with rain)
    I sure wouldn't use the term non-existent. Motorcycle tires can and do hydroplane. In a heavy rain with lots of standing water on the freeway one of my bikes hydroplanes at about 70 MPH and another one at about 75. It's not a big deal to me because it usually happens on the freeway going straight and all I have to do is either ride it out or scrub off a little speed to drop back down to the pavement. I'm usually in the carpool lane on the freeway and the cars next to me, judging by the speed they slow down to, are hydroplaning at about 60ish under the same conditions.

    (FYI: The tires on those bikes are Michelin PR2s.)
    #15
  16. Tyko99

    Tyko99 n00b

    Joined:
    May 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    6
    I crashed in 09 when my bike cartwheeled at 55mph and threw me head over heels. Despite what some claim, not all accidents are avoidable. I rolled quite a ways before stopping. Bike was a write-off. So was my helmet. I was riding again as soon as I could buy a new bike. No issues.
    #16
  17. viverrid

    viverrid not dead yet

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    30,482
    Location:
    Western Mass
    There's a video floating around, several actually, one was linked here on ADV, of a dirt bike being ridden over a pretty damned big pond all the way over to the opposite shore. NOT ridden THOUGH the pond, ridden OVER the water. Yup, motorcycles never hydroplane!
    #17