Textile jackey made in the USA??

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by CheesyRider2, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. CheesyRider2

    CheesyRider2 Adventurer

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    As part of my New Years Resolution to avoid things made in labor camps (China), I am shopping for a textile "adv style" jacket
    Any ideas??
    #1
  2. Wlfman

    Wlfman Long timer

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  3. TheWorstKind

    TheWorstKind In the Wind

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    motoport
    #3
  4. bwringer

    bwringer Gimpy, Yet Alacritous

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    Most Aerostich stuff.

    You don't get any more ADV-ish than that.
    #4
  5. lhendrik

    lhendrik Truffle Rustler

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    Is there any American manufactured adventure motorcycle wear that doesn't look like Pillsbury Dough Boy? How about some European makers ($$$$), or do you object to Hungarian or Czech slave labor too?

    Better check on the American made label too, I wonder where the materials to make those suits and zippers come from.....maybe another evil empire. :D

    P.S. CheesyMan: I hear the Chinese may boycott Wisconsin cheese because the cows are unhappy :D it works both ways.

    One Planet.
    #5
  6. CheesyRider2

    CheesyRider2 Adventurer

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    Sorry did'nt mean to insult anyone.
    I do believe that due to the low, low. low pay (like 2 bucks a week), long hrs (15 hr days) and lack of safety or pollution cntrols that I would avoid things "Made in China". madison Ave will tell you its all good-but we kn w who pays them, don't we
    Is my resolution perfect?? No but it's a grass roots start
    Thanks
    #6
  7. wizz

    wizz Up a creek......

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    Spidi's high end stuff is made in Romania. That is what I'll be replacing my motoport with. As well thought out adventure gear as humanly possible, ce certified, and doesn't look like 3 year old designed it. Plus I'm a more athletic build which the bulky motoport has never really fit.
    #7
  8. StuartV

    StuartV Motorcyclist

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    I don't think my Made in USA Motoport suit makes me look like the Michelin Man. And I think it's perfectly fine for adventure riding. I definitely prefer it to my Aerostich Roadcrafter or my Aerostich Darien suits. Though, now that I have my GS, I have been considering getting a Motoport Marathon stretch kevlar jacket, since the riding position accomodates a longer jacket better than my GSX-R does, and the longer jacket would give me more pockets, and the stretch kevlar would be a bit warmer.

    [​IMG]
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    #8
  9. ph0rk

    ph0rk Doesn't Care

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    If you want Made in America textile gear -and- style you're out of luck.
    #9
  10. lhendrik

    lhendrik Truffle Rustler

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    That is OK looking stuff.
    #10
  11. StuartV

    StuartV Motorcyclist

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    OK? Thanks, I guess. ;)

    Keep in mind that with the Motoport gear it's custom. So, if you don't like the way something looks you can change. Don't like the cargo pockets on the pants and want jeans-style pockets? No problem. That's actually how my pants come if you don't request customization. Want the pockets on the jacket arranged differently? No problem. Want different colors? They have that, too.

    I think the Motoport gear will look as good or bad as you order it to look...
    #11
  12. wizz

    wizz Up a creek......

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    Not saying motoport isnt decent gear, i can hand it down as its held up well. my opinion however is there is no amount of changes you can make to have a nice looking jacket. glad you like yours. made in the usa, worth what it costs but not more and isnt on the same level as the high end spidi which is why im replacing it, granted the spidi costs twice as much. just my $.02. it is a shame the us manufactured are so limited.
    #12
  13. StuartV

    StuartV Motorcyclist

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    If there's better gear, I want to hear about it. And I'll buy it!

    So, what is better about the Spidi gear?

    Links?
    #13
  14. wizz

    wizz Up a creek......

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    From my experience with motoport and my limited experience and huge amount of research I believe that the spidi ergo exp is a much more refined, technical piece of kit that is ce2 certified (the suit that is). However, motorport makes what seems to be safe long lasting gear made in the usa. Youre free to do youre own research and come to youre own conclusion and if you disagree thats fine, and its great you like youre gear.
    #14
  15. VFR Titus

    VFR Titus Adventurer

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    Sorry, first of all, WAAAAAAY off topic here... look away now.... go with Aerostitch, fantastic stuff built for the ages

    Ah...... depending on province, but let's pick Guangdong where Shenzhen and Guangzhou is where probably 80% of the textile stuff are made.... their minimum wage has gone up 20% year on year for the last 4 years.

    Last I checked it's roughly 3500 RMB/560USD a month (70 times the 2 bucks a week example), working 8.5 hours a day before OT.

    The days of the locked up workers are long gone (gone in the 2000s), these days the workers will bring the fire marshal down your ass if they feel the least bit unsafe (or used as a salary bargaining tool, I kid you not). But the days where factory owners killed themselves because they had a dream of manufacturing things (poorly or not) for a living was crushed when their entire shipment went overseas and got "back claimed" because not of shoddy workmanship but poor sales. You never hear people complain in the 80s about poor quality because things flew off the shelves and made the corporate brands rich. But when the economy tanks or the brands actually see an opportunity to MAKE MONEY FROM the factories (oh, sorry this barcode is put 1cm more to the left, it still scans but we're gonna charge you 50USD "labour" anyway on this box of shirts you're selling for 10USD), you get corporations mercilessly shifting all liabilities and risks to the factories. What kind of business can you go into without any risks? Go into garments; if they don't sell at Walmart, you got 120 days to NOT PAY the factories; just say a button was off color and you're scot free. To hell with the workers if the factory owner bankrupts themselves and gets persecuted by the local authorities and lynched as a "heartless factory owner" when they can't pay their bills cause you screwed up on your own marketing and sales forecast?

    If you ask anyone in China what they want to do in order to make money, 15 years ago they'd tell you to open a factory to supply the life style of the west. Now they'll tell you to go into real estate to give everyone one of the billion people a home with their Japanese brand TV and German brand cars and American brand.... clothing?

    It's a good thing; I've read about how companies are finally moving some stuff like pillow manufacturing back to the UK for example (or Apple with the MacBooks, though not sure how much of that ISN'T a political gesture).
    #15
  16. wizz

    wizz Up a creek......

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    the machinations of the global garment industry are quite complex. nice perspective. tough to get an accurate picture when relying on media driven by consumers that desire sensationalism.
    #16
  17. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams

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    Consider mine. It's on ebay currently, so let me know if interested and we can work a deal.
    #17
  18. rockydog

    rockydog just a guy

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    so let's assume that if you removed all the 'foreign' parts from the computer you are using what would hap..........pen?
    #18
  19. pschuyler

    pschuyler Adventurer

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    Pretty funny, but spot on. Most of the appliances, clothes, and even some food comes from the new global trade ecosystem, it's hard to avoid but I see the desire to get goods made from our own labor force.
    #19
  20. bwringer

    bwringer Gimpy, Yet Alacritous

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    Short answer: no.
    #20