thank goodness for insurance

Discussion in 'Face Plant' started by mst3kguy, May 13, 2018.

  1. mst3kguy

    mst3kguy n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2
    took my one-month old 2017 tiger explorer 1200 out for a good ride, as i finally got past the 1000 mile mark. rode about 5 hours, was 15 minutes away from home on a lovely curvy country road, and encountered something i've never experienced in 20 years, and 200,000 miles, of riding. as i was going through the left hand curve, i felt the rear end of the bike swerve, as if it was either on ice (driving in a straight line) or as if the rear wheel itself had lifted off the ground. the bike has abs, traction control, etc etc, doesn't matter because i wasn't braking anyway. no gravel, grass, etc in the road. by the time i started to regain control i was running off the right side of the road. tried to ride it out on the grass, but once i hit someone's gravel driveway, that was it.

    snapped the shift lever off, the lever didn't break, the rod did, flush where it enters. had sw-motech upper crash bars along with the triumph engine bars, those took the majority of the blow, but tank still sustained scratches, and it appears the sw bars bent in a smidge.

    as i waited for roadside assistance, i noticed how blustery/windy it was. i now believe that the wind caught my topbox, which is that big square thing, and caused my crash. i've ridden with the givi e52 for nearly 20 years on 2 fj1200s, an fjr1300, and two street triples, but never experienced anything like this. the difference is the e52 is round, whereas the triumph box is a flat square, like a sail.

    progressive came out a few days ago, about $4700 in parts and $1100 in labor.

    aerostich roadcrafter saved my skin, no injuries other than a nasty bruise on my thigh where i had a flashlight and pocket knife. alpinestars glove has a nasty ground down portion on the hard plastic over carbon fiber knuckle protector. helmet has a few gouges. oddly, my flip flops remained intact, so weird. har.

    insurance guy is betting it'll take the better part of 6 weeks to get the bike back to me from the shop. thankfully i have the street triple...
    #1
  2. Unstable Rider

    Unstable Rider Farto Motograffer

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    I would normally say ride safe, but it's too late in this case.
    How about "be well"?
    #2
  3. celltech

    celltech Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2014
    Oddometer:
    194
    Wow,
    Thankfully you seemed to avoid a lot of damage. I'm a huge aerostich fan and this is a great reminder for me to wear it.

    Heal quickly!
    #3
  4. O.C.F.RIDER

    O.C.F.RIDER Loose nut behind h/bars

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    It would seem to me that you would need a Tornado force wind, pinpointed at the back of the bike, to actually lift the rear wheel off the ground.
    Anti-freeze sounds like a more plausible reason. This demonic liquid has taken me out not once, not twice, but three times! Sometimes you smell it first, sometimes you don't. VERY hard to see it also. Until after you've bailed and you're walking back (hopefully one is walking) wondering aloud...............WHY THE FUCK DID I JUST CRASH?????? But that shit will take you down instantly!!!
    Good news is you're OK!
    Sucks that the shifter shaft got sheared off.


    At least you have another bike to ride!

    Ride On!
    Chris
    #4
  5. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    Diesel fuel can also be a bugger on the pavement. All but invisible.
    #5
  6. Sleepyc

    Sleepyc I have a Moto Boner!

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2017
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    Location:
    Cleveland Heights, Ohio
    Yea, had to be fluid of some sort. I have had big square cases on my bikes and been in 70 mph wind gusts where I was riding at a 45 deg angle to stay upright and the bike never lifted up. I bet if you did the math, you would see it's not possible... let's take a look at the math for just 1 normal sized person SANS motorbike...

    Screen Shot 2018-05-15 at 8.22.24 AM.png


    SO.. I imagine with the weight of the bike, and you and the friction of the bike, you would need a gust of upwards of 150+ MPH top just push the tail around.
    #6
    Unca Fud likes this.
  7. Motor7

    Motor7 Long timer

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    East Tennessee
    Yep, it sounds like the rear tire encountered something that caused it to lose traction. It could have been anything from sand to a leaf or any number of fluids. What was the rear tire pressure....did you check it before the ride or after the crash? I almost went down in a tight sweeper on my DRZ and the rear behaved exactly as yours, but I saved it. Stopped and checked pressure....it was at 12psi.....110% rider error.

    I am not a big fan of ginormous top boxes, but I don't think it was a factor unless you had 2 cases of beer in it....with ice.
    #7
  8. O.C.F.RIDER

    O.C.F.RIDER Loose nut behind h/bars

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    BUT.......................it's usually easy to detect with your snot-locker.

    Chris
    #8
  9. O.C.F.RIDER

    O.C.F.RIDER Loose nut behind h/bars

    Joined:
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    It could have been anything from sand to a leaf


    A leaf??
    That would have to be one hell of a big ass leaf!

    Chris
    #9
  10. Motor7

    Motor7 Long timer

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    When near maximium lean a leaf could be all it takes....and the Sycamore tree leaf here is as big or bigger than your hand w/fingers spread out. Anyway, that is why I no longer try and grind off the chicken strips...it just ain't worth it.
    #10