The 1200 Tiger Explorer Mega Thread

Discussion in 'British Beasts: Triumph Tigers' started by dutchie, Sep 17, 2010.

?

Explorer or Explorer/XC

  1. Explorer

  2. Explorer/xc

Multiple votes are allowed.
Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. GarrettRB

    GarrettRB Bike Nerd

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Oddometer:
    227
    Location:
    South Shore of MA
    Not technically off road but here's what I did today. My issue was the weight of the bike and OEM tires. The throttle didn't seem to be a problem but traction control was kicking in as you can see on the controls. I'm a complete noob to riding off road so my review may be meaningless. :huh https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQmIMRw4I58
  2. Hank.SD

    Hank.SD Jet Measurer

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,300
    Location:
    Sodak


    Its hard to imagine they don't have corrosion resistant spokes on an adventure bike... Wow. I'll be watching mine closely!
  3. AtlantaDR

    AtlantaDR Anything on 2 Wheels

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    141
    Location:
    Atlanta
    I had the use of an XC for 5 days last week in California. Spent about 3 hours one afternoon doing fire roads and some single track. The fire roads were rocky, rutted and had some good ups and downs to give it a pretty good test.

    As someone who has been dual sporting for 30 years on bikes half the weight and CC's of the XC, I was pleasantly surprised. Even with the stock tires and no mods, the bike did really well. The throttle was a non-issue, but to be fair I have put about 10K on my personal Explorer, so I felt at home with it.

    I experimented with the ABS and the Traction Control on and off. Although it was more fun with the TC off, it certainly was capable with it on, and for a newer rider it might even be preferred as it might keep you out of trouble.

    The ABS never caused me any major problems either, although I enjoyed a more traditional experience with it turned off.

    I did not find it top heavy as others have criticized. and never found myself in a spot where I thought it was too heavy to climb or descend.

    The suspension did its job well and the front wheel did not wash out on me, even in what I would refer to as medium sand conditions.

    I wish I had my Explorer with me that day so I could have ridden them back to back in the same conditions to see how they compared.

    My summary would be that an XC in the hands of an experienced rider should provide tons of fun for all but the roughest conditions. With the right tires and with the suspension dialed in, I think the XC could take you farther off-road than you think. The only challenge I would anticipate would be picking the bike up if you dropped it on a hill.

    I thoroughly enjoyed the ride.
  4. TIGERRIDER007

    TIGERRIDER007 Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,106
    Location:
    Acworth, GA
    From the sounds of your comments, this XC can hold its own doing some exploring. Sounds promising, thanks for the comments.
    :D
  5. SeattleExplorer

    SeattleExplorer n00b

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2013
    Oddometer:
    9
    Fair amount of forest service road riding on my 10 month old Tex. very little off-road before that, and I bought the Tex with whole idea to do multi-day road trips interspersed with forest service roads. Very happy with the Tex. Not trying severe single track rocky stuff yet, but turn off ABS/TC, deflate OEM tires to 22lbs, adjust handlebars up, and off you go. Putting on K60s this week.

    Some have complained about multi-button process to turn off ABS and TC and fact that bike resets all to "on" by default when key turned off. I found that if you stop engine with kill switch (and don't touch key) ABS will stay turned "off". If you stop engine by lowering kickstand while in gear, both ABS and TC stay "off" ... Significant decrease in button hassle at those trail stops for rest and pics.

    I've dropped it a few times, discovering the auto-shut-off feature. Depending on the landing position, one person with right technique can get the bike up, but fully loaded it is a bear. Always best to have someone else help.

    Twitchy throttle? Got used to throttle in first 200 road miles. At 10k checkup got remap that settles throttle down even more. No throttle sensitivity concerns at all for me.

    I don't think of the Tex as a dirt bike. More like a touring bike that's quite comfortable and capable for dirt-based touring.
  6. XFBO

    XFBO Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2012
    Oddometer:
    52
    Location:
    NNJ
    Any chance on sharing that Purolator part number?
  7. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,743
    Location:
    Osoyoos, BC
    Purolator Pure One PL14612
  8. littlefield

    littlefield Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 6, 2004
    Oddometer:
    119
    Location:
    SE Texas
    The new 1200's use the same oil filter as the 1050's. Lot of alternatives, I use a Mobil 1 110.
  9. TIGERRIDER007

    TIGERRIDER007 Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,106
    Location:
    Acworth, GA
    Is there enough room for TKCs under the front fender? Would like to see a picture if you get one taken... I'll have to ride one again, to see if this might be on the short list...I'm liking the XC, with spoked wheels.
  10. Big Jon

    Big Jon Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2012
    Oddometer:
    381
    Location:
    SW Iowa

    Touratech has come out with a front fender riser. It raises it about 1/2" & is well worth the money if you're going with any tire more aggressive than OE... :D

    http://www.touratech-usa.com/Store/PN-422-5441/Front-Fender-Riser-Kit-Triumph-Tiger-Explorer-1200
  11. M Bouthillette

    M Bouthillette Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2012
    Oddometer:
    33
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
  12. ICOM

    ICOM Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    13
    I own a Yamaha Super Tenere, my spokes are POS. My Tenere is a 2013 and had about the same mileage as yours when I first noticed them corroding along with a lot of hardware on the bike. It looks to me the front wheel is the same exact wheel but the rear is different on your bike. Yamaha is replacing some under warranty but it is a big fight. Then there is the problem of getting them replaced correctly and the wheels remain true it is not a happy experience and if I could have gotten a ST with cast wheels I sure would have. Spoke are going to be a headache with both our bikes.
  13. ridenm

    ridenm Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,845
    Location:
    Carnuel, NM USA
    I'm familiar with two types of tubeless wire-spoked wheels. Trials bikes mostly use the kind with a flange on the rim, and the spokes connect to the flange (no rim penetration). I understand others have individual o-rings where each spoke fits directly into the rim. What kind does the XC use?
  14. St_rydr

    St_rydr Strider

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,920
    Location:
    Jnsvl, WI
    New Tex owner here. I got the faster graphite colored one. What have you all been getting for miles out of the stock tires before needing replacement? Hoping to get 10k miles this year without rubber expense.
  15. element6

    element6 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2011
    Oddometer:
    48
    Changed out both within the last week with just over 11K miles on the clock. Front was down under 1/32" and rear was just over 2/32"

    Situation forced replacement with Bridgestone BattleWings, which seem to have good reviews, but probably wouldn't have been my first choice. Have to wait and see how they work out.

    Dave


  16. ICOM

    ICOM Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    13
    Spokes are connected to these flanges that are positioned down the middle of the rim and no penetration into the rim on the Tex & Tenere. The BMW's place their spokes on the outside lip of the tubeless rim.
  17. RideDualSport.com

    RideDualSport.com TPB all the way

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,639
    Location:
    Texas at large.
    Howdy, could anyone comment on the Explorer's ergonomics for a rider like myself who is 5'8" and 160 lbs?
    I found that I could easily put my feet mostly to the ground, however when riding, I felt like the reach to the bars was a bit far for me. I kept sliding forward on the seat and "humping the tank" a bit. The back 1/3 of the seat was not occupied by my butt.
    The Guzzi Stelvio is on my list as well, and it felt as though its cockpit was more compact. I can sit upright with a relaxed reach to the bars while a bit farther back on the seat. What I am looking for is a very relaxed upright riding position that feels natural to me.
    I loved everything about the Explorer, but came away feeling that it is built more around the physique of riders who are 6 ft or more. Also, the suspension seemed a bit stiff for a solo rider of 160 lbs, I understand the bike does have a high load capacity which may account for that.
    Thank you for anything you can offer that may validate my impression.
    Cheers!
  18. Voluhzia

    Voluhzia iExplorer

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,620
    Location:
    Cary, North Carolina
    Many use ROX risers that can swing toward as well. I put 20mm raiser from SW-Motech as I like riding standing...

    For the seat, try high front and low rear for the seat height adjuster... It'll keep you back... I had had that set up for about 3000 miles well now, with more than 23000 it back to high-high and I'm comfortable...


    Facebook
    Nova Scotia on Explorer
  19. Voluhzia

    Voluhzia iExplorer

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,620
    Location:
    Cary, North Carolina
  20. RideDualSport.com

    RideDualSport.com TPB all the way

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,639
    Location:
    Texas at large.
    Thank you for the tips on suspension adjustment and the potential for re-positioning the bars too!

    From an MC News report:
    http://www.mcnews.com.au/Testing/Triumph/2012_Explorer_1200/Review1.htm

    "...it sets a new benchmark in motorcycle final drives...virtually no discernible drive-line lash...you would swear you had a perfectly adjusted new chain rather than a shaft."
    I agree the drive train never exhibited any traits that brought any attention to it! Sort of like the belt drive on my Buell TT.

    "...Explorer is no light weight but the heft is never felt on the move..."
    I was shocked at how nimble the bike felt, perhaps the wide bars and sporty stance of the bike helped it steer so lightly.

    "...load capacity, are no doubt the reason why Triumph have fitted the Explorer with such taut suspension....the 46mm Kayaba forks and the single shock in particular do transfer small bumps through to the rider..."
    Yes I noticed this, I rode over railroad crossings and small potholes to test for a compliant suspension, and it was a firm ride.

    "...It is probably a price worth paying when loaded to the gunnels with panniers and partner....this is where the suspension package will come into its own and when fully laden, perhaps make it shine a little above the competition thus loaded..."
    This is good to know since I am looking for a big ADV bike that will handle a passenger and luggage with ease.