The 650 Dakar Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by underwaterguru, Mar 10, 2009.

  1. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    The high oil pressure indicator makes itself known by the bath of 10W40 coming from the top of the engine, often anointing the rider's boots and/or creating a cloud of blue smoke as it contacts the exhaust pipe at stops...
  2. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Thomas

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    Well, at least your boots are waterproof now if they weren't before
  3. Hamburgler

    Hamburgler Adventurer

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    Sounds good,thx for the advice guys,ill leave it where its at since i put in the 2.4l.
  4. WayneC

    WayneC Long timer

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  5. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Thomas

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    Fuck Touratech and their fucking stoneage designs #IMO_sucks
  6. WayneC

    WayneC Long timer

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    I can see you are having a good day there Gravelseeker, care to enlighten us
  7. bkwags

    bkwags Adventurer

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    Hey all, as is the case with many Dakars, loaded with 200+ pound riders the front end seems a bit soft. I have located testimonies that new springs will make a significant difference..... and I believe that. However, does anyone have any insight on how the different brands compare. Two popular ones are Progressive and Tourtech. There is about a $75 difference in price between the two. Are there any other brands worth checking out?

    I plan on taking the Colorado Backcountry Discovery Route in July. Mostly long day trips with ~38 liter soft bags full of stuff and maybe maybe a couple of overnights, so include camping gear. We'll probably ride +/- 200 miles per day. That's about as aggressive as I plan to get with this bike. As I get older comfort and handling are replacing the need for speed and excitement.

    In short, what brand of springs, spring rate, other mods to the exisiting front end would help. The seals are all good and I have 10w oil in the front shocks.

    Next question is, what effect will changing the front end have on the rear shock. Which also seems a bit squishy. Are they rebuildable? I really have not looked back there yet.

    I'll be riding Trak Master II's if that makes any difference.

    Thanks in advance!!
    BKWags

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkS-XI4w61s&feature=player_embedde

    http://www.backcountrydiscoveryroutes.com/COBDR
  8. WayneC

    WayneC Long timer

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    You are wasting your time and money with changing the springs, it will only make dirt road performance worse

    The problem is the forks are piston rod forks which means the compression and rebound damping is the same and hence the front end uses very stiff springs compared to cartridge forks where the pathways are separated

    You want to improve the forks fit Ricor intiminators to separate the compression and rebound damping circuits or go to a cartridge fork like the YZ forks

    You can read about it at f650.com or here http://www.f650gs.crossroadz.com.au/ForkUpgrades.html

    To put it into perspective the KTM 900's use a 0.48 spring, the far lighter Dakar uses 0.6, the difference is cartridge fork vs piston rod fork
  9. Gangplank

    Gangplank Advenchaintourer

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    What he said. It makes an improvement but not enough to be worth it vs. the gold valve or ricor intiminators + springs.

    I had my old 2001 Dakar done by Traxxon Dynamics and they were FAR superior to the stock set up.

    The YZ swap is the next step up from that....
  10. crunchiespg

    crunchiespg Long timer

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    can anyone give me some suggestions...

    ive got an intermittent fuel leak on my 2005 dakar..
    the fuel pools inside the top of the fuel pump assembly and then pours down the left side of the bike..

    i thought at first the fuel pump cap inside the big donut was cracked, but on closer inspection it seems fine and what i thought was a crack is just a plastic moulding line. the fuel hoses seem ok, and nothing else obviously is out of place. the bike only has 7000km (2500 of which were put on it last week)

    so any suggestions of what to check?
    cheers
  11. WayneC

    WayneC Long timer

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  12. crunchiespg

    crunchiespg Long timer

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    On further inspection it seems like fuel is leaking from under the big ring screw cap. The top of the fuel pump where the hoses and wiring goes seems fine thankfully as correct me if I'm wrong but that can't be purchased alone and only comes with a new fuel pump (at over $500!!!)

    So assuming its leaking from the screw on part is a new o ring likely to fix it?
    Cheers
  13. africa twin

    africa twin Been here awhile

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    There's a big rubber seal under that plastic screw on ring. If you check it you will almost certainly find it is split. I had the same problem with mine and put in a new seal and is been fine ever since. It is a little tricky to install because as you lower the pump assy into the top of the tank it tends to roll the seal over out of position. It only takes a little patience and lube to get it to seat properly tho.
  14. crunchiespg

    crunchiespg Long timer

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    im hoping and thinking that is what is the likely cause.. i'll grab a new rubber seal and give it a shot..
  15. isgila

    isgila Been here awhile

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    When doing oil change, i always drain about a liter first. Then start the bike for a second or two. Low oil lights up indicating the sensor works. Switch off the bike then continue draining.
    I always top up 2 liter of fresh oil. Its easier to top up rather than drain out.
  16. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    Ummm...... I sure as hell wouldn't do that. The light comes on because you have low oil pressure, which can be damaging to the engine. Why would you purposely start the bike in a known bad condition? If I don't know whether or not my sender works, there are better ways of testing it.


    1911fan
  17. tomatoe333

    tomatoe333 Long timer

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    :huh:eek1

    This.

    If you want to know if your pressure sender works, simply turn the ignition on without starting the bike. Engine stopped = zero oil pressure, and the oil light should light up and stay on. It should also go out quickly (within a second) of starting up the bike.
  18. dwayne

    dwayne Silly Adventurer

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    It's NOT an oil level sensor (you mentioned "low oil") it's an oil pressure sensor. It is possible to maintain oil pressure with less oil than the "full line" BUT if you have a low oil pressure condition in the engine, damage (especially to the cam journals in this type of engine... the are set high and are plane or hydraulic bearings) is likely...granted it is more likely with extended running at higher RPMs, Ironically the main bearing will are less likely to be damaged (roller bearings lower in the engine).

    It seems a needlessly risky way to test the light when you can accomplish the same thing by watching to see if it turns on after you hit the kill button.
  19. GrizzLee

    GrizzLee RubiKon Adventures

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    Folks,

    I am tentatively planning a trip to Alaska with my 17 year old son. We would leave the first week in July. He will be riding the Dakar (me, I will be on my 1200 GSA).

    I am looking to get a second set of tires to ship up there (either Fairbanks or Whitehorse) for the bikes. We are planning to ride the Dalton Hwy (We hiked and have driven the Dempster hwy 3 times now). Because most of the ride will be mostly pavement with some gravel (save for the Dalton.. which can be sludge). I am leaning towards Metzler Toruances. However, I was thinking that a larger (wider front tire) would be nice for him especially in cornering. He is new to riding and we will be taking it nice and slow on two lane roads all the way up from our home in Washington State.

    I am looking around and am wondering what the largest tire I could get on the front that would be road friendly and still have some dirt capability (I don't want big commando off-road tires).

    2nd question...
    I was also thinking of converting the rims to tubeless. To avoid the flat hassles associated with tubed wheels. Anyone done this? Like it?

    Was looking at the Outex tubeless kit.

    Thanks for your help.
  20. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Thomas

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    Glad you asked.....lost power to my IMO... dead, no speedo nor fuel range and trip-, day-, season- and total milage get's more off as it's not logging any info. It's happened intermittently before, but it was full stop this time.

    TT has gone for a very odd sollution when it comes to collecting all the info and passing it on to the IMO itself. Instead of "one" solid two-piece regular contact, they have a little collector box with a print card. In addition to being another fairly large piece you have to store behind the headlight (or somewhere else), there are shifty little weak ass quick contacts on the print card and the main 8-lead for the IMO is soldered to the card. The little contacts are not very sturdy and work loose over time (my IMO is 10-11 years old).
    Come to think of it I'll try to cut all the wires and bypass the little collector box next time I'm in behind the headlight.

    Shifty little weak ass quick contacts:

    [​IMG]

    And the collector box where the shifty little weak ass quick contacts mate with the print card:

    [​IMG]



    Secondly, another annoying fact which is why the next time my battery dies, I'll move to another brand. You can either ship the unit to TT in Germany to have the battery replaced (I did and payed about $135) or you can try to separate the IMO and get in there yourself.

    Inside the IMO itself are (form the lid down)
    - Screen/ monitor
    - Top print card
    - Bottom print card with the internal battery

    Everything is caked in silicone so I left it to the pro's, but may have given it a try if I had known about about these instructions

    It's 2013, time to get our heads out of the '80-90s.

    [​IMG]