The 650 Dakar Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by underwaterguru, Mar 10, 2009.

  1. GSBS

    GSBS FunHog

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    JT Sprockets have worked well for me every time; not too pricey either. X-ring chains have given me 25-28K miles of service each. Haven't used O-ring chain on the Dakar, but doubt they'd last as long.
  2. dwayne

    dwayne Silly Adventurer

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    The components came from a 99 ish 640/620 Adventure (single brake, 17mm axle, 50mm WP Extreme Conventional forks), the adventure uses a wider spacing on the mount lugs than the SC/EXC etc variants of the 50mm forks. I used the KTM caliper with the BMW master (not ideal because one of the pots on the KTM caliper is a little smaller, so more lever effort is required, but not horrible either). A longer brake line is required because of the extra travel. My bike was a non ABS, so there were no issues there. The bearings seemed compatible enough that I left them alone. I have since run the WaBDR, UtBDR, and CoBDR with no issues. My last deals is to remount the stock caliper using a custom machined adapter and slightly stiffer springs.

    My focus was a setup suitable for heavy adventure touring (all dirt/gravel/mining road). The two biggest issues I wanted to control was fork flex, and the forks packing up on rocky descents while fully loaded & I feel I accomplished this goal. I stayed away from inverted forks (I seem to get alot of leaking seals, and they are a pain to replace), but did not want a damper rod stye fork. The WP 50mm have a great reputation for being a plush, controlled fork and being pretty rigid...plus they go for a song.

    One thing if you do the conversion is to stay away from the WP 43 mm inverted...parts are getting a little hard to find, and you may as well do it right, so a 48mm front end would be the ticket. Go for an 640/690/950/990 front end and you get the heavier brakes out of the gate.

    Again I would look at the Yamaha stuff before you make a choice.
  3. mettalique

    mettalique Been here awhile

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    For what it's worth I've just bought a DID 520 vx2 from Bargain Bike Gear in Oz for $89.95 plus postage
  4. Kainic

    Kainic Almost there

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  5. Linusp3

    Linusp3 Been here awhile

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    Any noticeable improvements?
  6. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Thomas

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  7. Damian_74

    Damian_74 Been here awhile

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    [​IMG]<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    I purchased on of Scheffelmeier Metal’s oil coolers too, went to fit it up the other month and noticed that there is no provision in the end cover for the oil bypass valve.<o:p></o:p>
    Looking at the BMW oil schematic, the oil filter is fitted with a relief valve as a safety device if the oil filter blocks. The BMW oil covers inside face is cast in such a manner that the oil can flow if the filter blocks, and the relief valve lifts.<o:p></o:p>
    Scheffelmeier’s cooler has a flat face with no provision for oil flow.<o:p></o:p>
    My fear is that of the filter becomes blocked; there will be no flow and causing engine damage.<o:p></o:p>
    I contacted Stephan (Scheffelmeier Metal) and his reply was<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    “Sorry I didn´t know that if I designed the cooler. <o:p></o:p>
    I can mill cut a groove for the oil flow in it but you must sent it back to me for that. <o:p></o:p>
    Regards Stephan.”<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Little disappointed in the reply, yes he has offered to mill a groove in the cover (note: the end cover is only 4mm thick, not sure I would want a groove milled in it!) but the postage was at my cost – not cheap considering I’m in Australia.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    I am working on another solution, a grooved spacer with galleries, pressed into the end.<o:p></o:p>
    Another possible improvement to the cooler is replacing the original filter K&N–151 with a K&N-152 (The 152 is longer - larger surface area), but the same in all other dimensions. The Scheffelmeier cooler uses a long spacer between the filter and housing, this will obviously require shortening for the longer filter and relief valve spacer. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    http://www.knfilters.com/search/product.aspx?prod=KN-151<o:p></o:p>
    http://www.knfilters.com/search/product.aspx?prod=KN-152<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    On the whole, I feel that the concept of the cooler is good, but a few major points where overlooked in its design. Another grip is that it appears during its manufacture there was a mistake with the mill that has subsequently been welded. It is noticeable as the anodizing hasn’t taken to the weld.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    At the same time I purchased a front sprocket/ case saver. This they got right!<o:p></o:p>
    Perfect fit, much better than any of the rubbish that TT puts out.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    http://www.bashplates.de/BMW-G-650-Xchallenge-Xcountry/Front-sprocket-cover-case-saver-BMW-G-650-X::43.html<o:p></o:p>

  8. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    Black text on a grey background. Were you trying to make it hard to read?


    1911fan
  9. Damian_74

    Damian_74 Been here awhile

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    Sorry about that - 300 miles out to sea - internet via satellite connection (very very very slow internet)

    Tried to correct the text colour but as it took me about two hours to upload the text and photos, I lost interest!

  10. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious

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    Meant to also say that I've been looking at that filter cooler, thanks for the writeup, also.


    1911fan
  11. TobyG

    TobyG be happy :)

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    I got the same oil cooler and if you expect the same performance from it as you'd expect from a normal oil cooler,
    this one is not for you.

    It doesn't do too bad, though,
    considering there's no further mods required to fit it.

    I mainly bought it because I had an easy with the oil getting damn hot for a couple reasons (resolved by now),
    and it helped get the oil up to 8°C cooler.

    During high speeds (70+ kph) that is,
    as for slow riding this oil cooler won't do much, other than increasing the oil capacity.


    Short version:
    It works better than I thought, yet it doesn't do much for low speed riding
    nor will it deliver the same performance like an traditional oil cooler.






    On another note:
    Do we have any members from the Netherlands here? :ear
  12. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    On a contrasting note, what would people do to make the engine oil hotter?

    I may have partially solved my long running question as to what makes my engine spurt oil like a whale during occasional winter runs. After a trip home last winter when the oil light did not go out the whole way, i left it with a local shop. I had taken it to them a few years ago when it started giving off large clouds of blue smoke as oil oozed out of somewhere on the top and leaked down to the exhaust and such. (The year before i had a similar experience and took it to a BMW shop where they replaced the head gasket and shifter seal under warranty saying those (both) were the problem... not.) The previous trip to the local shop resulted in a garbled explanation about camshafts and dry sump engines with the advice to not run the engine at high RPMs while warming up- something i doubt i ever did but didn't prevent the problem even after making sure not to.

    The visit last winter yielded an explanation seemingly more promising. According to them, the oil return line on the front right of the engine is small enough and at a level such that any water in the oil system can freeze in it and restrict flow, causing pressure to build up and oil to exit from some point near the front top of the engine.

    For me this is a warning that i'm getting lazy and using the bike for too short of trips in winter, i need to bicycle or walk more. However, this winter i work once a week somewhere i will need to commute 9 miles each way and won't be bicycling that. Is that long enough for the engine to heat up and burn off the moisture if it were, say 20*F out? 10*? I assume shifting so that the RPMs stay around 4500 or 5000 would help. Would cardboard over the radiator? Is there an oil additive that could help? Any other thoughts? I've had some people say that below a certain temp the oil might not heat up enough no matter how long i ride.

    I guess i should buy one of those radiator caps with the thermometer on them to see for sure, do they function well?
  13. TobyG

    TobyG be happy :)

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    What I've seen done on Cross bikes during winter races is they covered half the radiator to help it get to running temp.
  14. michael1968

    michael1968 Long timer

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    Nope, that's what your thermostat is for (if it's functioning correctly), if your coolant temp is below a certain level it will bypass the radiator completly.

    If you want to get the engine up to temp you want to increase the load on it, eg short shift it (without lugging it) with wider throttle openings vs revving it with less throttle. It sounds like you're doing this already though.

    Only other things I'd suggest is checking the oil type, there are specific winter oils we run in the mining industry if we're sending a machine to Siberia or somewhere but I'm not sure if these are avaliable for bikes (most people probably aren't crazy enough to ride when it gets that cold :evil).

    Cheers,
    Michael
  15. WayneC

    WayneC Long timer

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    Damian_74, instead of the K&N oil filter, take a look at the K&P SS filter, also rebadged as Scotts KandP Engineering
  16. guavadude

    guavadude de-composer

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    My rear tail light bounces around a lot. From what I can tell it's only held on with clips.
    Has anyone modded theirs? I saw one guy built a metal bracket for it, just wondering if there are any easy options or if I should just ignore it.
  17. wpoll

    wpoll Been here awhile

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  18. dwayne

    dwayne Silly Adventurer

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    what weight oil are you using? you will need to run a 10 or lower first number. A synthetic oil will not thicken like dino oils at low temps (yeah I know about it not being recommended). That might help, or you could try a heater (like for water pipes so they don't freeze) on the line before you start your bike.

    On the other hand Paul Mondar road the Trans Labrador road at -50 or so on an F650 didn't he?
  19. wiz.au

    wiz.au Been here awhile

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    Actually, you can fix the rear tail light wobbles quite effectively by removing the tail light and shortening the two steel spacers that go in the rubber mounts. Need to take about 1mm or 1/32in off them.
  20. Gravel Seeker

    Gravel Seeker Thomas

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    I would think 9mi is far enough to get it hot, but maybe you could try to insulate the pipe in question ? And of course run winter grade oil

    [​IMG] [​IMG]