The Adventure Begins... Tejas A La Tierra

Discussion in 'Epic Rides' started by troyfromtexas, Sep 28, 2011.

  1. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,128
    Location:
    Passing ADV Stalkers in California
    Congratulations on completing a stellar adventure:clap:freaky:clap:freaky

    If you have time or inclination I know some of us DR650 riders would love to know how the bike held up ... here are a few ideas.
    1. Maintenance issues?
    2. Part failures or parts replaced? (beyond normal maintenance parts)
    3. Any cracked sub frame or chassis issues?
    4. Any wheel bearings go bad?
    5. Any thing else?
  2. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    [​IMG]
    My flight from Buenos Aires to Houston went according to schedule. I arrived safely and was greeted at the airport by my mom.
    [​IMG]
    We drove over to the airport cargo office and picked up Emi. She was wrapped up just as I remembered. I remounted the front wheel and rear case... and off I rode.

    No lie, it was pretty sweet to spend some time visiting with my family in Houston.
    [​IMG]
    After a couple of days in Houston, it was time to hit the road once again for my final ride to my home in Austin. I decided to not take the most direct route along the interstate highway, but instead opted to take the alternate route that would take me along some of the backroads through central Texas. I headed down highway 90.
    [​IMG]
    This alternate route was the best way to be reacquainted with Texas. Along the way I would see farm houses flying the Texas flag.
    [​IMG]
    Texas cattle
    [​IMG]
    Texas small towns
    [​IMG]
    Texas drive-in fast food restaurants like Dairy Queen.
    [​IMG]
    Texas small businesses like smokehouses
    [​IMG]
    Texas courthouses
    [​IMG]
    Texas grain silos
    [​IMG]
    And, in the town of Shiner, Texas...
    [​IMG]
    There is the K. Spoetzl Brewery also known as the Shiner Beer Brewery.
    [​IMG]
    I stopped by the brewery for a tour and tasting, but unfortunately it was closed. Do you think anyone would have noticed if I hauled off one of those beer kegs on the back of my motorcycle?
    [​IMG]
    And yes, we have oil in Texas. This oil pump just happened to be decorated as a see saw with kids on top.
    [​IMG]
    This oil pump looked a bit out of place. We do not have killer whales in Texas, except at the amusement park in San Antonio call Sea World.
    [​IMG]
    I passed by the town of Luling, Texas which is famous for this BBQ restaurant called City Market.
    [​IMG]
    In Texas we cook our meat by slowly smoking it in a pit for around 6 to 8 hours. The meat absorbs the smoky flavor of the wood, becomes very tender and a little charred on the outside. The types of meat that one can usually find in a BBQ restaurant in Texas include brisket, ribs and sausage. Sometimes they may have a pork loin, prime rib, chicken or turkey. The side dishes are pretty simple like coleslaw, beans and potato salad. Some places will sell beer, some places will allow BYOB (Bring Your Own Beer). My apologies to my friends in Argentina and Brazil... but our beef is better!
    [​IMG]
    I passed by the town of Lockhart which is famous for BBQ. This small establishment is Black's BBQ.
    [​IMG]
    This large establishment is Kreuz's BBQ.
    [​IMG]
    Finally I arrived at my home in Austin, Texas.
    [​IMG]
    27,549.6 miles or 44,336.8 kim... 14 months... 16 countries... 3 continents... what an adventure!
  3. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    My experience with the DR650 was that the moto was solid. I started with a new 2011 DR650 and did all the modifications myself. Check out the mods at this link.

    1. No real maintenance issues. I oiled my chain every 500 miles. I changed my oil and filter every 3000 miles, cleaned my air filter every 3000 miles or after lots of dirt riding. Changed my tires about every 8000 miles. Tubes lasted 27,000 miles. Washed her every once in a while.
    2. No failures or breakdowns. I had to replace my spark plugs on the road once after riding various altitudes and started to experience some poor acceleration and fouling.
    3. No issues with the subframe or chassis. I kept it all stock just in case of issues on the road, but did not experience problems. I had a Pat Walsh Design rear rack that connects to the rear handle grab. After riding some 20,000+ miles, while riding some rough roads in Bolivia, while carrying 10 liters of gas in a spare tank, one of the handle grab welds broke. It was bearing a lot of weight over some rough roads. I had it rewelded for $2. See the story under Bolivia
    4. No problem with wheel bearings. I lubed them maybe 2 or 3 times.
    5. I oiled my chain quite a bit, kept fresh tires, bought the best quality gas available always, tried to travel with a light load that was centered. I invested most of my money on protection and comfort modifications. I did not change the motor, exhaust or suspension at all.

    I did lay down my moto a few times at low speeds, but it did not result in any damage, just scratches.

    I hope that this answers your questions.

    - Troy
  4. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    [​IMG]
    I feel honored. I have been asked to give a talk about my adventure "Texas to Tierra del Fuego" at the Austin Moto Festival on April 13th at 5pm. I'm putting together a presentation right now. I will be discussing adventure motorcycling trip planning, bike selection, bike preparation, gear selection, and tell a few stories and show a few slides about travel in Latin America. Stop by and check it out if you are in the neighborhood.

    For more information: Austin Moto Fest
  5. Slickrick

    Slickrick Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2007
    Oddometer:
    31
    Location:
    Seattle
    Congratulations!

    Excellent Ride Report!! Thanks for your time & effort.
    I will be volunteering at the Texas Moto GP, would like to buy you a beer & hear some of your stories.
    I am planning on riding south in a couple of years, once the last kid is out of the house, on my trusty DR 650.

    Thanks again for the great ride report.
  6. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    I should be around the grounds most of saturday. Hope to meet you. Thanks for following along.
  7. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    I really did not have a route planned out when I began my adventure. I just rode to the first placed, asked around, then found the second place, etc. But, I wrote a post on my blog for every place that I visited, thus was able to record my route. Here you go...

    Texas to Tierra del Fuego and Beyond

    Texas
    Austin
    McAllen

    Mexico
    Reynosa
    La Pesca
    La Poza Azul
    El Cielo
    Alta Cima
    Tamtoc
    Xilitla
    Zacualtipan
    Aquismon
    El Tajin in Papantla
    Xalapa
    Puebla
    Cholula
    Oaxaca
    Puerto Escondido
    San Christobal de las Casas
    Palenque

    Guatemala
    Huehuetenango
    Todos Santos Cuchumatan
    Panajachel
    Santa Catarina
    Chichicastenango
    Gualan
    Antigua
    Santa Lucia Milpas Altas


    El Salvador
    La Hachedura
    San Blas
    Juayua
    Apaneca
    Laguna Verde
    Ataco
    Alegria
    Berlin
    El Espino

    Honduras
    El Almatillo
    El Espino


    Nicaragua
    Somoto
    Leon
    Cerro Negro
    Granada
    Mombacho
    San Juan del Sur

    Costa Rica
    Samara
    Monteverde
    Mastatal
    Uvita
    Mombacho
    San Juan del Sur

    Panama
    Volcan
    Santiago
    Panama City
    Portabelo
    Darien Gap

    Colombia
    Bogota
    El Desierto de Tatacoa
    San Augustine
    Popayan

    Ecuador
    Quito
    Isla Galapagos
    La Mitad del Mundo
    Mindo
    Banos
    Lago Agrio
    Cuyabeno
    Amazon
    Cuenca
    Ingapirca
    El Cajas
    Loja
    Vilcabamba
    Macara

    Peru
    Piura
    Chiclayo
    Huanchaco
    Chan Chan
    Lima
    Huacachina
    Chala
    Arequipa

    Chile
    Atacama
    Tocopilla
    Chanaral
    La Serena
    Santiago
    Puerto Montt
    Puerto Varas
    Frutillar
    Puerto Natalles
    Punta Arenas

    Argentina
    Provenir
    San Sebastian
    Ushuaia

    Antarctica

    Argentina
    Lapataia
    Tolhuin
    Rio Grande

    Chile
    Punta Arenas
    Puerto Natales
    Torres del Paine
    Puerto Natales
    Osorno

    Argentina
    Villa de la Angostura
    San Martin de Los Andes
    Junin de Los Andes
    San Carlos de Bariloche
    Paso Del Indio
    Puerto Madryn
    Puerto Piramides
    Peninsula Valdez
    Mar Del Plata
    Buenos Aires
    Rosario
    Cordoba
    Mendoza
    San Rafael
    Valle de la Luna,
    San Agustin de Valle Fertil
    Ischigualasto
    La Rioja
    Andalgala
    Tucuman
    Salta
    Siete Colores
    Quebrada de Humahuaca
    Posta
    Coctaca
    La Quiaca

    Uruguay
    Colonia del Sacramento

    Bolivia
    Tupica
    Salar de Uyuni
    Potosi
    Sucre
    Saipina
    Santa Cruz
    San Xavier
    Concepción
    San Ignacio
    San Miguel
    San Rafael
    Santa Ana
    Samaipata
    Perez
    Sucre
    Tarabuco
    Bourgue
    Monteagudo
    Camiri
    Villamontes

    Paraguay
    San Pedro
    El Chaco
    Parque Agripino Encino
    Mariscal
    Filadelphia
    Loma Plata
    Concepcion
    La Laguna Blanca
    Asuncion
    Encarnacion
    Jesus de Tavarangue
    Trinidad
    Ciudad del Este

    Argentina
    Puerto Iguazu

    Brazil
    Foz do Iguacu
    Guarapuava
    Curitiba
    Ilha do Mel
    Florianopolis
    Sao Paulo
    Rio de Janeiro
    Niteroi
    Ilha Grande
    Buzios
    Petropolis
    Ouro Preto
    Mariana
    Itabirito
    Congonhas
    Tiradentes
    Curitiba
    Foz do Iguacu

    Argentina
    Santo Tome
    Concepcion de Uruguay
    Buenos Aires

    Texas
    Houston
    Shiner
    Luling
    Lockhart
    Austin
  8. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
  9. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,128
    Location:
    Passing ADV Stalkers in California
    Fantastic display of bikes there in Austin! Some serious collectors/restorers out there. Very impressive! :clap:freaky
  10. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    I have really enjoyed sharing stories and photos with each of you through my blog TheAdventureBegins.tv. Your views, comments and support have been a great encouragement to me. Who would have thought that anyone would show an interest?

    Almost on a daily basis I receive feedback in person or though my website about traveling in general or about my adventures. And often people ask me... what is next?

    Well... I have been thinking about writing a book. But I have been wondering if anyone, other than my mother, might buy and read a book about my travel experiences. So I thought that I would try to survey you... my family, friends and fellow adventurers.

    Would you take one minute to complete this five question survey? I promise that it will take less than 30 seconds. Your feedback will be greatly appreciated.

    Don't worry, you would not be under any obligation to buy a book at this time, I'm just asking questions and trying to gauge interest.

    Click here to answer... The Survey

    Cheers,

    Troy
  11. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    [​IMG]
    I recently had the opportunity to chat with a fellow adventure motorcyclist named David C. Parkinson. I thought that some of you might be interested in what we talked about.

    David, tell me why?
    Ever heard of the Langston Hughes poem "A Dream Deferred?" Hughes mulls on what happens to deferred dreams. Doing this motorcycle adventure to South America was my deferred dream... I had always wanted to go on a long trip from when I was a little boy. In college I had an opportunity but started a company instead. When I left my job at Microsoft I had another opportunity but started anothre company instead. I knew at some point I had to make this happen; or else I would never travel and my dream deferred might shrivel up or explode!
    [​IMG]
    The best thing about my motorcycle is…
    I ride a 2005 Suzuki DL650 V-Strom. It's incredibly reliable. I have put 20,000 of the most difficult miles for any motorcycle to take but the V-Strom keeps coming back for more.

    The worst thing about my motorcycle is…
    At 250kg dry, without gas and gear. It's a bit heavy for off-roading but that hasn't stopped me from taking it plenty of places it was never intended to go!

    I cannot travel without…
    My Charles Schwab check card. This is a travel secret everyone should know about. It's one of the only cards I know of that you pay 0% foreign transaction fees on, is free to use at all ATMs worldwide, and finally they'll reimburse you for the ATM fees the ATMs charge you. So essentially you can get money out for free, whenever you want, whatever country you're in (no limits). The account is free (you must set up a brokerage account and a checking account) with no minimums. What I do is transfer $1000-2000 into my Schwab account to cover a month's expenses. With this technique you stop thinking about the ATM charge as they are reimbursed at the end of the month, and it makes it easier when you know you will be exiting a country not to have too much currency left over.

    When I’m riding solo, I think about…
    What a lucky ******* I am to have the opportunity to travel by motorcycle in Central and South America. More people should travel this way!

    I like it when I ride into a town and…
    See the smiles on people's faces. There's something about a motorcycle that just cheers everyone up.

    I would like to go back to…
    Mexico, Colombia, Nicaragua. I was in love with Colombia and spent nearly 6 months there!

    I was surprised to find out that…
    Almost anything can be repaired. When abroad, it's normally the case that repairing your items is far cheaper than buying new items. Locals' ingenuity have repaired everything from my tent, my motorcycle, my watch, my aluminum panniers, to my GPS.
    [​IMG]
    My attitude about travel is…
    Do it when you have the opportunity.

    The single most important thing that I could tell someone is…
    When you like a place; stay there for awhile. When you meet a person you like, stay there for awhile. It's great travel advice that I wish I had followed more often.

    You can read more about David and his adventures at his website www.davidparkinson.com
  12. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,128
    Location:
    Passing ADV Stalkers in California
    Great stuff Troy! I like David's attitude and spirit. Microsoft? :lol3 Who wudda thunk it! :D

    Have you thought any further about your book? Self publishing makes it possible but getting a major to sigh you up is tough. But if your touring round doing talks and slide shows ... well that is the perfect place to sell a book.

    I helped Host Austin Vince when he came into my area (NorCal). About 200 fans showed up and he sold just about everyone there a CD or two.
    (his two movies). He did at least 20 presentations nationwide and sold CD's at all of them.

    Good luck!
  13. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    I'm still working on the book. Right now I'm hunkered down in a cabin in Truckee, CA working on the book and trying to get in a little fly fishing. Hopefully I'll have good results with one or the other.
  14. JackJack

    JackJack Dulce Periculum

    Joined:
    May 19, 2011
    Oddometer:
    427
    Location:
    MN
    Either way you have set yourself up for WIN! :clap
  15. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,128
    Location:
    Passing ADV Stalkers in California
    Truckee is excellent!
    Be sure to say Hi to all the young beauties at Wild Cherries Cafe ... a great Cafe. I always stop on my way through.
    Good Fishin' ! :clap
  16. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    Check it out, fellow Adventure Motorcyclist David Parkinson wrote this review about hammock camping and about the Hennessy Deep Jungle XL Hammock for TheAdventureBegins.tv.

    See the video

    About Hammock Camping
    After a long day of riding a motorcycle in a foreign country... you’re tired... you’re exhausted. When the sun starts to set, the last thing you want to think about is finding a flat and dry place to set up your camp shelter - setting up your tent, moving your gear inside and inflating your air pad. Over the last twenty months of riding my motorcycle from Seattle, Washington to Buenos Aires Argentina, I’ve spent many nights camping underneath the stars, mostly ‘stealth camping’. For the uninitiated, that means camping where there is no official campground. While I love stealth camping, it can get tiring, especially when you’re spending 20 minutes to setup and another 20 minutes to break down. After 20 months of packing and unpacking, I admit I don’t particularly enjoy the shelter setup or breakdown process.
    [​IMG]
    (Eno DoubleNest Hammock)

    But when I left the States, I didn’t just have a tent, I had a hammock! The motto of the Boy Scouts is “Be Prepared.” So, with that in mind, before I left the US I bought a Eno Doublenest Hammock and an accompanying Eno Guardian Bug Net. During 20 months on the road, I spent about 20 nights in this setup. While the setup process differed from that of setting up my tent, I didn’t notice significant time savings, nor did I have a good fly for the hammock, which meant I got rained on a few times. Also, adjusting the hammock was a pain as I had to tie and re-tie knots with webbing each time. When I lost some of my better webbing, I bought inferior nylon webbing, which resulted in me being dumped forcibly on the ground more than once. Also, it was difficult to get the knots out of my webbing once the hammock had been loaded. I cannot recommend these for the motorcycling traveler.

    I needed a better solution. I’m currently plotting a motorcycle trip from Buenos Aires, Argentina through Brazil and Venezuela. I did a lot of research on the perfect hammock at hammockforums.net. The two best brands discussed most often were Hennessy and Warbonnet. What sets these two brands apart from the rest, other than their inherent quality, is that they each have a bug net integrated with the hammock. This means no separate bug net at setup/breakdown time. I decided to go with the Hennessy Deep Jungle XL for two reasons: At the time of my writing, 1. The Warbonnet hammocks required a 3-4 week lead time to purchase and receive a hammock, and one must buy a tarp separately. 2. The Hennessy hammocks were readily available and ship with a tarp.
    [​IMG]
    (Hennessy Deep Jungle XL Hammock)

    Here are my initial thoughts on the Hennessy Deep Jungle XL Hammock. I will also post a follow-up review after I’ve used it more extensively along the beaches and jungles of Brazil and Venezuela.

    Features and Functions
    Pack size/weight: I think I can scrunch the whole setup to the size of a football... and this package includes the fly as well! It weighs in at 2 pounds 13 ounces, less than one half of the weight of my REI Half Dome 2 Plus tent!

    Pouch in the hammock: You can hang gear like your keys, tablet and head lamp in the integrated movable pouch that hangs on the ridgeline of your hammock.

    SnakeSkins (integrated stuff sack): These are basically nylon stuff sacks that you place on your hammock line that make packing the hammock a simple matter of sliding them over the hammock.

    Bubble Asym Pad: The hammock ships with an integrated bubble pad for cold weather camping. I plan on using my hammock in hot or tropic environments so I can’t comment on this.

    Integrated Bug Net: This saves an incredible amount of time with setup. Two zippers allow you to seal yourself in, or open the bug net and drape it. Before, I had to run a ridge line, then run clips, then hang the bug net. In addition, my previous hammock took up more space in my motorcycle panniers because the bug net was separate.


    Double Layer Hammock Material: Mosquitos are a pesky bunch and, believe it or not, they can actually bite through a single layer of material. When buying a hammock, I recommend you purchase a double layered hammock.

    Fly Included: There is a rain fly included so you have a complete sleeping system. If weight and size are not an issue, many people opt to use a hex tarp.
    [​IMG]
    Fast Setup/Breakdown with Single Ring Suspension: When it comes to hanging the Hennessy, the generally accepted model is their figure 8 lashing, which keeps their cord brand new. The only downside to this method is that it is not adjustable. I wanted something that’s easy to tie, easy to un-tie and adjustable for those times when one end of the hammock hangs too low or too high. You can read more about this dilemma here. This suspension system has made setup of the hammock no more than a few minutes. Hennesey doesn’t recommend this system as it can lead to cord damage.


    Pros

    Fast setup and breakdown
    Integrated bug net
    Great nights sleep! (I spent last night in the hammock here in the hot muggy weather of Kansas, I’m hoping it was a good test for Brazil)
    Complete out of the box: comes with everything you need out of the box... nothing else required

    Cons
    Lacks the footbox feature of the Warbonnet hammocks. Warbonnet hammocks feature extra material for your feet to make you lay flatter. That being said; I slept very well in the Hennessy.
    Cost: it’s a bit expensive at $339.95, but the good news is there are Hennessy models starting at $99 (The Scout) I just happen to be 6’6” and needed a longer hammock. If you compare the price of the Deep Jungle XL compared to the Warbonnet + the tarp you must purchase (if you don’t want to get rained on); these top of the line hammocks are very comparable in price.

    Closing Thoughts
    I'm excited to take this gear to South America. I'll follow up from Brazil!

    - David Parkinson
  17. Adv Grifter

    Adv Grifter on the road o'dreams

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,128
    Location:
    Passing ADV Stalkers in California
    I lived and traveled around Mexico, Cent. America and S. America for 7 years in the 70's. Only a small part on Bikes. For some of those years I used a Hammock. Lots of people in Mexico and Cent. Am. live in Hammocks ... in fact whole families live in them, every night. This is how I learned, watching locals, asking questions.

    Lots of travelers had Hammocks too ... and I tried lots of different ones. The Euro, UK, Oz ones were hopeless, IMHO ... what in the world would anyone from England know about Hammocks :lol3 Some local ones from other Latin countries were also not great.

    Some Noob travelers did not know how to lay in a hammock (like the girl in the pic above ... all wrong). You don't lay length wise in Hammock ... you lay diagonal or cross ways. Now you can really sleep ... and not fall out. :lol3This is Hammocks 101 on the subject. :thumb

    The best hammocks I found were the multi colored Cotton weave type made in the Oaxaca area. Tourists buy Nylon ones ... but they are STIFF and uncomfortable, but last forever. The Cotton ones give, are very comfortable but over time ROT in the Sun. I paid $15 for my Deluxe Hammock. It's what most ALL the locals used back in those years.

    Based on advice from Mexicans living in Hammocks ... I bought a "Matrimonial" which gave ample room. These Mexican Hammocks are a fine weave of many strands. It's important to keep untangled ... easy once you know how!

    In places like Tikal I simply clipped a 2 oz. piece of Mesquito net over me. cheap, expendable, packs to nothing, for sale in any Tienda.
    Basic: Do what the locals do. Now light up a Mesquito Coil up wind.

    During my Hammock days I was back packing. Once I got to S. America I sent my Hammock and a bunch more stuff home ... as Hotels/Hostels were the best call along the Gringo Trail. I had seen enough Sub Tropical Jungle in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras ... had NO INTEREST of more in the Amazonas regions. Been there, done that. :D

    The problem with Hammocks is ... what do you do when there are no good Trees? Sometimes finding a place to hang it puts you in a NOT SO GOOD or SAFE situation. Most travelers don't want to carry a Tent ... and a Hammock! I chose a Hammock but in some situations had to go begging for a place to hang it ... or to sleep. :tough

    But when it would rain all night (like in Tulum, Mexico and Tikal) the poor guys in tents floated away. I carried a cheap Poncho (cost about $1 then), kept me and gear more or less dry! :D

    While living in El Salvador (Surfing and teaching English at a local school) I slept in a Hammock at my rented house ... a big Palapa really. Chose my Hammock over the beds supplied with the house. Too many BIG Scorpions around, Rats in the Palm frawns ... so Hammock with Mozzie net was best. Even so ... Scorpions would sometimes drop ... No worries ... the big black ones are mostly harmless. :eek1 (six inch long)

    Just my .02 cents after 2 years in a Hammock.
  18. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    I've driven by many times, but now I'll be sure to stop by.
  19. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    I appreciate that .02 cents. Pretty good deal. I agree with ya.
  20. troyfromtexas

    troyfromtexas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    281
    Location:
    Texas
    [​IMG]
    I enjoy watching films of all genres. But I must admit that I especially enjoy watching films about motorcycles and motorcycle travel. Over the next few weeks I'll be screening some of my favorite motorcycle movies. Check it out...

    On Any Sunday is a classic film and perhaps one of the most nostalgic motorcycle movies of all time. The film is a documentary about the various forms of motorcycling as the sport was emerging in the 1970's. Malcolm Smith, Bert Lawwill and Steve McQueen star in many of the scenes. My favorite segment is with Malcolm Smith riding the International Six Day Trial in Spain. While the style and cinematography of the film is perhaps a bit dated, I think that the humor is timeless.

    The complete film is now available for viewing on YouTube or click right here. (1:36 minutes)

    If you have not already joined my blog or facebook page for TheAdventureBegins.tv, why not?
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/TheAdventureBeginstv/298783000136160