The Advrider Baja 500 Caper

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by neduro, Jun 6, 2005.

  1. ktmnate

    ktmnate Long timer

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    Way to go Ned! I really wanted to be there but had some family stuff. I gota hand it to the Advriders. They always come thru.




    :lurk
    #41
  2. Ignore Amos

    Ignore Amos bruised, dazed & confused

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    Naw, nothing like that at all....it really sucked there I promise!!!



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    #42
  3. Nata Harli

    Nata Harli Accidental Tourista

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    Yeah, I'll bet. The only thing that sucked was probably the ride up there.

    And, BTW, Overlander said he had his bike parked right next to the road at a winery. Somehow, I can't believe neither of would see an orange and blue two-wheeled vehicle parked right next to the room. I think he had too much wine at the winery. He also decided to cross over at Mexacali and he had an hour and a half wait at the border.
    #43
  4. marndo

    marndo Been here awhile

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    #44
  5. summerinmaine

    summerinmaine Hells Atheists MC

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    #45
  6. Jim Bud

    Jim Bud Long timer

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    [​IMG]

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    #46
  7. michocolombia

    michocolombia Aventurero de Corazon

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    Oh man, with that video and those pics, I am packing up for november!!! See you all there!
    #47
  8. Jim Bud

    Jim Bud Long timer

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    #48
  9. Ignore Amos

    Ignore Amos bruised, dazed & confused

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    Oh....you mean this pool?


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    #49
  10. Ignore Amos

    Ignore Amos bruised, dazed & confused

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    Just down the hill from Mike's, Overlander (Lee) and myself set up a "just in case" pit where if they (Jimmy in this case) felt he needed a front or rear tire, we'd be ready-we'll Jimmy blew right on through (so fast that I didn't have time to take a pic) but that's was cool cause it meant things were well...[​IMG]
    We had the tires leaned up against my big pig, even used the outlet to run a monitering radio to follow the race with. Met Kip and Lincoln there (friends of Tim's) who were there to work the Simpson pits for Tim and Jimmy (very cool guys and awesome riders!).
    #50
  11. Jim Bud

    Jim Bud Long timer

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    [​IMG]
    #51
  12. beach comber

    beach comber Apprentice Adventurer

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    Good Looking out these are great shots of the BMW and Ned Racing by!!
    #52
  13. neduro

    neduro Addict Super Moderator

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    Now, before we merged all these threads, I titled my report “A tale of two bracelets”. My reason for doing so is that there are two plastic bands that went around my wrist as part of this adventure, each of which had tremendous meaning for me.

    The first was my patient ID tag in a hospital.

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    The week before prerunning, I found myself crawling into the emergency room with back pain so severe that I couldn’t stand up to save my life. The night before, I had been unable to get into bed without help from a friend, and when I woke up in the morning, the pain was only worse. So I crawled to the van, drove to the ER, and admitted myself for X-Rays and professional help. I was devastated by this turn of events- the threat of not being able to race brought home to me just how badly I wanted this race, how much I wanted to go through with this adventure.

    The doctors were non-committal. They agreed that the pain was nerve related, but they couldn’t order an MRI from the emergency room without paralysis (!?!). X-Rays revealed nothing untoward in the bones of my spine, but that was probably expected. So, I was left with a decision- would I risk going forward with prerunning when I couldn’t be sure what was wrong with me?

    You all have the gift of retrospect, so you know how I decided. The pre-running story is here.
    #53
  14. neduro

    neduro Addict Super Moderator

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    I still don't know what caused my back to be such an issue at such a poorly chosen time. Maybe it was nerves and stress manifesting as tension. Maybe I shouldn't have spent the day jumping around a trials course. Maybe this was all a really bad idea.

    In any case, motorcycling friends came through (thanks, oio), and after some manipulation from an osteopath I decided to get in the van and head down for prerunning. The rest of that adventure is referenced above.

    Prerunning was a very two edged sword, though. When I got back, I was supposed to be not just productive at work but superhuman, since I was working 4 days out of a greater than 2 week period. And not only that, but I was to fly in the middle back to Virginia to spend some time with my family for my Mom's Birthday party. And it was completely hopeless- all I could think about was the course, and the race, and that was probably all that I could talk about either.

    My emotions during that week came in waves. First Terror, mostly about the trophy trucks, and then Excitement, because I knew that I could ride that course, and then back to Fear, because I wasn't just riding the course but racing it. The period of the waves varied from a few hours to a few minutes, but I don't think there was a single moment that passed where one emotion or the other wasn't very near the surface, no matter how hard I tried to disguise it.

    And those of you who know me know how well I disguise my excitement. I try to look calm as a hindu cow, and it comes out like a clown on amphetamines that just swallowed a live eel.

    The moment to get on the plane to San Diego didn't arrive a moment too soon.
    #54
  15. neduro

    neduro Addict Super Moderator

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    This adventure could not have happened without a whole lot of people doing me a whole lot of favors. Believe me, it means more to me than you can imagine. It seems only right, though, to call a few folks out explicitly.

    Boejangles, who built me a seat for the XR that is beyond any expectation I might have had. I will detail the seat in another thread, but his expertise on building an awesome platform for hardcore dualsporting is without compare. Not only that, he's a fine guy to talk to and jumped through lots of hoops to get me a saddle at the last minute. Thank you, James.

    Surfphoto, who gave me his coveted hotel room, provided pit support much better than I deserved given my laughable level of organization on Friday (more on that later), and who kept calling me every few days for the weeks leading up and giving me a countdown accurate to the hour. Not only that, but he may have gotten me on OLN, which never hurts the sponsorship opportunities. Les, you kick ass.

    Tim Morton (Bajaboundmoto) who had nothing to gain from associating with a dirtball such as myself, but who went out of the way to help me nevertheless. Tim loaned me his personal bike for spares, which I proceeded to ruin (more on that later, too- there was no shortage of adventure in this weekend!) and when I told him the bad news, he shrugged and said "important thing is everyone is OK. It's just stuff." Tim is a class act and I'm glad to know him, even if that seems to be to his detriment. Go on a tour with him.

    LC4Carl, who drove a van to Ensenada instead of riding with all his friends, to get all our stuff up to El Coyote. The ultimate sacrifice. And never anything but a softly spoken "how can I help"... Thanks, Carl.

    My friend Winn endured a weekend of riding in stinky vans, listening to me babble incessantly about the race for weeks leading up to it (and now, probably for weeks after it), and never complained once. Not even when I made him sleep on the floor for the entire weekend. He's registered on this site as "photon" I believe and hopefully he'll be able to add a few thoughts to the story.

    And of course Rabia, who flew across the country to be a part of this sillyness, helped in every way she could at every opportunity, and supported me in the heat of the moment with clear thinking and that trademark smile. If you're wondering if she really is as cool as you think, she's not. She's cooler. Thanks. :rabia

    I often wonder that I should be so lucky as to know such people as you all. All I can say is that it would not have happened without you, and that I treasure the web we weave over these wires.
    #55
  16. cRAsH

    cRAsH Banned

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    :lurk
    #56
  17. GregInBoulder

    GregInBoulder Jerry rules. Get over it.

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    :bueller ... Actually well spoken as usual. :thumb


    Now, GET ON WITH THE DAMN STORY!! :rofl :rofl
    #57
  18. neduro

    neduro Addict Super Moderator

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    One of the first questions everyone asks is how much this race costs. My usual answer is a flippant “everything you have, for a time”, because it’s more true than it sounds. It consumes every waking moment and many sleeping ones, every penny that you can possibly justify and a few more, every ounce of energy and drop of gumption that you can muster. But I realize this isn’t really what they were asking, so in the interest of science, I’ll take a stab:

    Plane tickets for self and crew: $500
    Van Travel: (3000 miles * $0.37) $1110
    Various Travel Related (Mex insurance, Hotels) $500
    Race Entry, SCORE Membership: $750
    Crew and Personal Food: $500
    Race Specific Bike Prep: $500
    Pre-running: $250
    Miscellaneous: $250
    Total: $4360

    Obviously, it’s possible to argue with any of these figures- the van probably doesn’t cost me $.37/mile to operate, I’ll get use out of the new clutch, cables, chains and sprockets, etc that I put on the bike beyond the race, and so on. But suffice to say, it’s not cheap.

    But the money is less than half the story. For me, the mental preparation has been all-consuming for, literally, months. The last thought through my mind every night since late April has been wonder or fear or excitement about the race, and the new day resumes where the old one left off.

    And the moments in between have a lot to do with the race, as well. Afternoons in the gym, Evenings spent working on the bike, weekend training rides where I attack the same corner again and again, trying to improve technique so that riding 80% will require that much less energy.

    But all this is essentially about the how, not the why, which is the more interesting question...
    #58
  19. neduro

    neduro Addict Super Moderator

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    I think everyone here understands the attraction to motorcycles, but the importance of racing may not be so clear. Everyone has different reasons, and most of them sound trite and insufficient when exposed to the light of day (“Because it’s there”, et al), but since so many here have done their best to help me, I’ll do my best to explain.

    For me, racing can be boiled down to three things. First and foremost, racing is about being honest. To understand what it is to race, I had to start by admitting to myself that this was really important to me, and commit to give it my best shot. In most of life, it’s easy to do what is reasonable and call it good enough. Racing, by definition, is not reasonable, so there is no boundary that can be drawn around it. Racing is not a kind mistress, but she is an unerringly honest bitch, and when she gives you a kind word, it means something.

    Second, racing is fun, like nothing else I’ve found. The joy of riding motorcycles fast needs no introduction… and racing is about going fast.

    And finally, though this may seem a little shallow, racing somehow validates riding. I haven't been riding for very long in the scheme of things (5 years), but it seems to me like riding is the first thing I've ever been good at in life, and racing is a way for me to quantify that.


    So, once a year, I step back, take a deep breath, and dive into the deep end by trying a big race with a deep talent pool. Not because I want to win, but because I want to surround myself with people who are great at something that I care about, and let the effect rub off on me a little. In the past, it has been a Six-days qualifier, the Pikes Peak hillclimb, and Vegas to Reno. Lurking in the background has always been Baja, ever since I read about it under the covers with a Cycle World and a flashlight, ever since I saw the picture of Johnny Campbell sideways on a big XR, wrist holding the throttle to the stop. For years, every corner I went through, I asked myself how Johnny would have done that. It sounds funny, but for me, racing Baja was a personal acknowledgement that I've got a clue about the answer (about 75% of a clue, judging by finishing times :lol3).
    #59
  20. darmahman

    darmahman "Illogically Deluded"

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    I applaud you, Ned. :clap
    #60