The All New LIQUID COOLED R1200GS threadfest

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by Dorsicano, Feb 3, 2011.

  1. RL Lemke

    RL Lemke Long timer

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    E-gas and cruise control.
    An electromotive throttle actuator is now used for the first time in a GS motorcycle. Here, rider commands are passed on directly by the sensor in the accelerator twist grip to the engine control system; this then regulates the throttle valve electronically. The use of the E-gas system provides a significant improvement in terms of controllability and response. What is more, the rider can adapt engine characteristics to the situation on the road by means of five modes (optional extra). It was also possible to include an electronic cruise control function (optional extra).
    ASC and riding modes as an optional extra: five freely selectable modes - “Rain”, “Road”, “Dynamic”, “Enduro” and “Enduro Pro”.

    For optimum adaptation to the rider’s individual needs and purpose, the new R 1200 GS now offers five freely selectable riding modes for the first time: these are an ex works option and feature three different E-gas settings and with varying engine characteristics. Linked to this is Automatic Stability Control ASC with a special enduro configuration. If this option is chosen, BMW Motorrad ABS, ASC and - if installed - the semiactive suspension are all adapted to the respectiveprofiles of these five modes
    Semiactive suspension: BMW Motorrad Dynamic ESA for optimum riding dynamics in every situation as an ex works option.

    The new semiactive suspension BMW Motorrad Dynamic ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) taps into a whole new range of possibilities as well as providing maximum riding safety and performance. Dynamic ESA monitors the vertical movement of front and rear wheel control as well as other parameters by means of a spring travel sensor in each position, and adapts the damping automatically to the situation depending on riding conditions and the manoeuvres being carried out. Damping adjustment at front and rear is effected by means of electrically controlled regulation valves.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    ASC and riding modes as an optional extra: five freely selectable modes - “Rain”, “Road”, “Dynamic”, “Enduro” and “Enduro Pro” with three different characteristic throttle curves.

    In order to suit various purposes such as riding on the road, on wet surfaces or over rough terrain, an ex works option is available to the rider of the new R 1200 GS which comprises five different riding modes with three different E-gas settings, three different ABS settings and four ASC settings. To make the required setting, the “Mode” switch on the right of the handlebar unit is activated until the display in the instrument panel shows the desired riding mode. It is also possible to implement the rider’s command during travel: the mode change is made by moving the throttle twist grip to idle with the clutch lever pulled. When the motorcycle is restarted, the last selected setting is always maintained.

    The optional feature includes Automatic Stability Control (ASC) in a special enduro configuration for the “Enduro” and “Enduro Pro” modes. A special enduro configuration for the standard BMW Motorrad ABS is also featured – this is also used in the “Enduro” and “Enduro Pro” configurations. Dynamic ESA as an optional feature is then also integrated in the system of modes. Suspension set-up is adjusted precisely depending on the riding mode selected (see Suspension section).

    When riding on wet surfaces or in difficult grip conditions, “Rain” mode provides especially soft dosage and response characteristics to support the rider, though full torque and output potential are still retained. The electronic control system ASC (Automatic Stability Control) responds more readily than in “Road” mode. If the Dynamic ESA option is selected, the damping of the spring struts at front and rear is softer, in keeping with the conditions.

    In “Road” mode, the control systems are set to ensure optimum performance on dry roads. This mode provides a spontaneous, linear throttle response on dry roads. “Road” combines sound, supple controllability with a homogeneous build-up of torque.

    “Dynamic” mode reveals the sportiest face of the new BMW R 1200 GS for road riding. An even more spontaneous and direct throttle response, more restrained ASC intervention and tighter damping in the case of the Dynamic ESA option bring the full potential of the machine to bear.

    The “Enduro” mode enhances the R 1200 GS for off-road riding. A soft throttle response, restrained control intervention on the part of the Enduro ASC, optimum brake distribution and ABS control in conjunction with the high-traction set-up of the optional Dynamic ESA get the motorcycle ready to explore new enduro worlds. This means that even motorcyclists with limited enduro experience will quickly get their off-road bearings on the new R 1200 GS and enjoy lots of riding fun. The mode is optimised for use with standard tyres.

    For more ambitious enduro riders, BMW Motorrad offers the “Enduro Pro” mode. This riding mode provides spontaneous engine response characteristics and is designed for use with studded tyres. At the same time, the ABS function is disengaged at the rear by pressing the footbrake lever; the optional Dynamic ESA shifts into traction-oriented and optimum bottom-out set-up. ASC is set to professional enduro mode and permits considerably more slip. In this configuration, the sporty face of the new BMW R 1200 GS is revealed off-road, too, and the experienced enduro rider can move into an added dimension of riding fun due to further improved controllability of the machine.

    Semiactive suspension: BMW Motorrad Dynamic ESA for optimum riding dynamics in every situation as an ex works option and BMW Motorrad Integral ABS as standard.

    With the optional Dynamic ESA, BMW Motorrad offers an electronic suspension which taps into a whole new range of possibilities as well as providing maximum riding safety and performance. This semiactive suspension monitors the vertical movement of front and rear wheel control in travel and speed as well as other parameters by means of a spring travel sensor in each position and adapts the damping automatically to the situation depending on riding conditions and the manoeuvres being carried out by the rider. Dynamic ESA also responds to an ABS control brake manoeuvre, for example. Damping adjustment of the spring struts at front and rear is effected by means of electrically controlled regulation valves.

    The drastically improved contact between road and tyres means that the new R 1200 GS is able to provide a previously unequalled sense of security on very uneven roads and when riding off-road.

    Dynamic ESA does not work as a self-contained system, but is able to communicate with the other control systems of the R 1200 GS – BMW Motorrad ABS as well as Automatic Stability Control ASC – via CAN bus.

    What is more, the basic settings of Dynamic ESA are linked to the riding modes “Rain”, “Road”, “Dynamic”, “Enduro” and “Enduro Pro”, which can be conveniently selected by the rider at the press of a button. Each of the riding modes gives the rider a damper setting as recommended by BMW Motorrad experts. The mode switch can be used to adapt the overall characteristics of Dynamic ESA, engine control (characteristics), ABS and ASC to the given situation by selecting the various modes with their respective settings. What is more, the damper setting can be tailored to personal preferences in all modes, ranging from “soft” to “normal” and “hard” by means of the “ESA” switch on the end of the left handlebar. The load settings for one person, one personal with luggage or two persons are also set using this switch, just as the rider prefers.

    In “Rain” mode, the dampers have a soft basic set-up. In order to ensure maximum safety when accelerating, ASC is set for early control intervention in “Rain” mode. ABS is adjusted for use on the road.
    If the rider selects the “Road” mode, Dynamic ESA shifts to a tighter setup. ASC ensures optimum traction on dry roads and the ABS is also configured for road use.

    In “Dynamic” mode, Dynamic ESA provides an even tighter damper setting which is entirely geared towards a sporty style of riding on the road. In this profile, ASC characteristics are further tightened, even enabling experienced riders to perform light drifts. Here again the ABS setting is geared towards road use, while also providing a more dynamic throttle response.

    The “Enduro” mode provides a high-traction damper setting for off-road riding. Here ASC provides for more slip on the rear wheel, allowing light off-road drifts. The ABS setting is designed for running over loose surfaces such as gravel with road tyres, which have a higher approved level of slip. As on the road, the ABS operates with a part integral function: in other words when the front wheel brake is activated, part of the brake force is directed to the rear wheel. This is a feature which offers a high level of safety over rough terrain, too. Here the control strategy is designed so that wheel lock is prevented while still allowing effective deceleration. Increased ride stability and a greater sense of trust are the pleasing result.

    An additional coded plug enables the rider to access the “Enduro Pro” mode for more ambitious off-road riding. This setting provides significantly increased bottom-out reserves. In this mode - reserved solely for off-road use with studded tyres - experienced motorcyclists can deliberately make the rear wheel of the R 1200 GS break out due to ASC intervention adjusted to professional enduro use. The ABS characteristics are specially adapted to this type of sporty use since control is specifically geared towards riding on loose surfaces with studded tyres. What is more, ABS does not act on the rear wheel when the rear brake is applied. Deactivation of the part integral function means that the front and wheel brake operate entirely separately from one another, in keeping with the preferences of an experienced enduro rider, also allowing so-called initial brake drift before hairpin bends.

    And when the coded plug is used, the individual Dynamic ESA setting is preserved over a change of riding mode. Without the coded plug all settings are set to default, e.g. when turning off the ignition. ABS and ASC can be manually disengaged by the rider in all modes. With the coded plug inserted, the systems remain deactivated when restarting the bike after having turned off the ignition before.

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    [​IMG]
  2. cug

    cug --

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    It shows up for you because you're logged in to your Evernote account, but you should be happy that nobody else is.

    Is there a way to make it "public"? Or put it somewhere else, like PhotoBucket, Flickr, SmugMug.
  3. EJ_92606

    EJ_92606 Rider

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  4. cug

    cug --

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    Wow. I think that's the first bike offering this. Nice for some people.

    I really, really like what I'm reading about this new GS. It becomes more and more clear that I'll get one next year.
  5. Sock Monkey

    Sock Monkey Corporate slave

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    I hope that's a graph from a pre-production bike/ECU, or the wrong graph, or something, because that torque curve looks like a mountain range....not a single mountain, but LOTS of them! WTF!?!?! Can't the wexer (WetBoxer....WoXer? :lol3 ) put out a nice, wide, FLAT torque curve? :huh

    -SM
  6. EJ_92606

    EJ_92606 Rider

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    It's from BMW's media package. I compared several RPMs along the curve to the camhead and the new bike has higher torque at every point I checked. I think part of it is the scale used in this graph that makes it look peaky.
  7. cug

    cug --

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    I think it's partly the stupid exhaust valve thing that kicks in at certain RPM for German noise regulations. I never actually noticed it on the 2010 I had:

    [​IMG]

    It certainly looks pretty bad, but I really never noticed. I noticed the hacking, kicking, and bucking of the Multi below 3.5k rpm (Disclaimer: the one I tested was super bad, there seems to have been improvements and the 2013 adds a lot of improvements for this, too) much more and it annoyed me much more than the weird torque curve of the boxer.

    I had a 2010 R1200GS and this curve was barely noticeable when riding. There was a bit of a dip around 5k rpm, but it wasn't bad or so. And in normal riding, the behavior below 5k was much more important for me. I'm not certain how much you'll actually feel the dips on the new one. Time will tell.
  8. EJ_92606

    EJ_92606 Rider

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    It's interesting though, if you look at the camhead's dyno chart in this thread that uses a different scale, it looks very flat, but compare the woxer torque at anypoint to the camhead torque on the other chart and the woxer is higher, at least the points I checked, so I think the torque curve is a lot flatter than it looks. Camhead dyno thread: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=825851&highlight=dyno [​IMG]
  9. Emperor Norton

    Emperor Norton Kilroy was here

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    Didn't BMW do something similar with Race mode or w/e it was on the S1000RR wrt a dongle needed for a specific mode?

    Not liking the Tiger8?
  10. cug

    cug --

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    Love the Tiger and I'm very likely not getting rid of it. Just too many bikes out there to try. I'm on a crazy schedule there to offset my crazy work load and schedule a little bit I guess.
  11. Hunter6

    Hunter6 n00b

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    Is that dongle provided with the bike, or do they want extra money for it?
  12. NoobIAm

    NoobIAm Far, far from the Garden.

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    What marque is on the badge?


    :1drink
  13. yellowbirdrs

    yellowbirdrs Been here awhile

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    about the Multi-controller, I really think the GS have the same as the 2011-2012 RT and in the GS case is not going to be a Multi-nothing just the GPS :cry also the GS didn't have the K1600 color TFT where you can control the heated grips, ESA and almost everything in the RT it's only for Radio and GPS and for us just the GPS no radio no grips no nothing!
  14. EJ_92606

    EJ_92606 Rider

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    Good question, I don't see it listed on the options or accessories list though....
  15. DiabloTejano

    DiabloTejano b00b t00b d00d

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    since Germans(and Hawaiians) like to jam words together it should be
    der wasserboxermiteinsporkennase
  16. Emperor Norton

    Emperor Norton Kilroy was here

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    That has my vote.:clap:rofl
  17. RichBMW

    RichBMW Long timer

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    Well that's it. Deposit placed last week:clap This will be a long 5 months.:lol3
  18. tallguy-09

    tallguy-09 Smile 4 Miles

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    Sure, you really badly want that new German Boxer, admit it :D
    ...just like the rest of us, there's simply nothing that compares with it right now, right?
  19. cug

    cug --

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    I do admit that I like what I read. Still, the Tiger is an absolute blast to ride, and in some ways better for me than the GS was. The suspension on the GS was too harsh for me - 72kg isn't the typical Bavarian build ... :lol3

    The Tiger is better adjusted to my taste at this point, but I have high hopes with the new suspension on the new GS and the new windshield also looks a whole lot more thought out than the old POS.

    So, yes, the GS is a hard to beat package, the Tiger was better for me personally, but I think the new GS can surpass it and I also learned my hatred for chains all over again. I plain hate the idea of chain drive on my main ride. I'd take belt over chain any day for my style of riding.
  20. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid!

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    5th grade. Maybe too advanced for some!:lol3

    Jim :brow