The "amateur/pro woodworkers" thread

Discussion in 'Shiny Things' started by XR4EVER, Feb 20, 2014.

  1. White mt guy

    White mt guy Long timer

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    I don't know. A standing tree often is under tremendous stress. I honestly can't see ripping a tree in this scenario going well. I've been around the logging industry for nearly thirty years and have never seen this done. Please do a lot of research, or at very least be in full atgatt with video. Would love to see the out come.
  2. Tweaker

    Tweaker ...

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    What does that mean?

    Why would you want to do that?
  3. jar944

    jar944 Been here awhile

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    Trying to do it that way isn't going to end well.
  4. MaineScoot

    MaineScoot Been here awhile

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    I just finished this cabinet. It's over 30 feet long.

    [​IMG]
  5. Weekend_warrior

    Weekend_warrior Been here awhile

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    Nice work on the retail cabinet! like the curved corners. I'm sure that was a pain in the arse.
    panhead_dan likes this.
  6. highcountrypioneer

    highcountrypioneer Making America Great Again

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    Any idea what has happened to this wood. I used miniwax Golden oak stain. A few weeks later these marks appeared.

    [​IMG]
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  7. lochridge

    lochridge Been here awhile

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    thebigman likes this.
  8. corsair4360

    corsair4360 Been here awhile

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    What does hand rubbed varathane mean? It means that I applied three coats of Varathane (a polyurethane varnish) with a brush. Sanding between coats with 400 grit wet or dry sandpaper using water to lubricate and carry the sanding residue away. I sanded down until the ridges etc were removed, cleaned the surface and then re-applied the varnish, after curing repeat until the third coat was applied.
  9. White mt guy

    White mt guy Long timer

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    Wow , using water to sand between coats on poly is new to me. I gotta admit it looks great. Although it's recommend to never use water on uncured poly , your finish came out great. I have try that. What was the dry time between coats?
  10. Jan

    Jan Adventurer

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    Location:
    Dumaguete City, Philipines
    guanacaste live edge threstle table .
    mahogany and pine pipe display cabinet.

    Attached Files:

  11. FenceJumper09

    FenceJumper09 Been here awhile

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    Any chance you have any more pictures of the table base?

    That is very good looking!
  12. Jan

    Jan Adventurer

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    thanks.
    here you go.
    the table can be dismantled in case it ever has to move.

    the feet are apitong (out of 8x8) and the middle part is out of the "various hardwood " pile of the local lumber yard as is the stretcher.
    the legs are drawbored.

    Attached Files:

  13. FenceJumper09

    FenceJumper09 Been here awhile

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    Wow! It always amazes me to see projects from other parts of the world using local woods that are hard to get or really expensive in the states!

    Thanks for sharing!
  14. scootac

    scootac Just a Traveler

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    Wife and I were in Nova Scotia earlier this year and stopped at a plant making cutting boards from larch. No big deal right? But....they were showing the end grain for the cutting surface. We toured the manufacturing floor, I made some mental notes....
    and here's the result.

    IMG_5132.JPG

    It's only about 6x9" due to my lack of bigger clamps, but a learning process for glueing/clamping. I'll try next with cutting smaller blocks to get more pattern variety.
    Not near the project of many here....but my wife liked it!
  15. BillsR100

    BillsR100 Happy Paleoflatus

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    A keepsake box I made for my son's wife.
    Made out of old used pallet wood.
    WP_20170910_001.jpg WP_20170910_003.jpg
  16. Hughlysses

    Hughlysses Long timer

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    First post in this thread- I've been working on repairs to the top of an old cedar chest (1800's?) of my wife's. The top was badly damaged with chunks of wood missing where wooden pegs joining parts of the top had split the top boards. I've routed out the damaged areas and glued in "patches" from cedar boards cut from a tree that was cut in our yard last year.

    My question is regarding the wood color. The old cedar is very brown, while the new cedar is very pink. Is there an easy way to darken the new cedar sections so they'll more closely match the old ones? All the information I've found on line is regarding weathering cedar to turn it gray. If all else fails I can experiment with stain, but I'm hoping there's something I can apply to accelerate the natural aging process.

    Any info will be appreciated.
  17. BillsR100

    BillsR100 Happy Paleoflatus

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    I dont know of a way to accelerate aging of wood reliably.
    In your case your looking to match existing wood which may be more than aged, the old varnish on it may have aged as well also adding to the color it has. What I mean is even if you were able to age the new wood, it still may not match the old wood.
    I once worked with a old guy cabinet maker, he had all kinds of home brew methods to match old wood, everything from tea, coffee, even bottles of vinegar with rusty nails in it to make a nice brown color. Sometimes he'd use different colors of shoe polish and applied that to the wood.
    The only solution I can think of is lots time and experimentation.
    Lots of tips and comments HERE
  18. jar944

    jar944 Been here awhile

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    Ran some face frame beading last night.
  19. White mt guy

    White mt guy Long timer

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    Are both cedars the same species? Your best bet it to make a bunch of swatches from the cedar you used to repair the chest and order several colors of water soluble wood dye (powder form) red, orange,brown,black, green,yellow. I would also try scorching the wood then stain. With old cedar, brown will be your base stain , then try bits of differnt colors to adjust the tint.
  20. Tweaker

    Tweaker ...

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    I don't know about cedar but I have fumed and smoked a lot of oak flooring in various ways. Exposing it to 40% ammonia fumes produces a reddish tone (smoked). You might be able to experiment with this a bit with household ammonia (3%?) but the effects will be far less significant (if any). That 40% ammonia can kill you so be careful. Youtube has some demonstrations, I am starting to forget. Another route, depending on the severity is to just lay it in the sun. And any color matching attempts MUST be coated with your finish choice before you can accept it.

    One of the fun things about that ammonia is you can literally twist sticks into knots.

    Also, the question above about any existing finish on the old wood is very important. Most all finishes will amber considerably with time.