the bike just wouldn't make the turn....

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Andyvh1959, Jan 25, 2014.

  1. Paebr332

    Paebr332 Good news everyone!

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    This .gif stolen from the Killboy thread illustrates what happens with many bikes that "just wouldn't make the turn." Rider fails to look through the turn, panics, target fixates, stands bike up and rides it straight into the object he was trying so hard to avoid. [​IMG]

    Either that or a squirrel we all missed in the pics ran out in front of him and he had to swerve to avoid it.
  2. Flo_Evans

    Flo_Evans Been here awhile

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    Could be wrong (hard to tell from the .gif) but it looks like he tried to lean it further, touches down with a peg or something and is startled upright. Looks like he has way too much shit on the back and didn't adjust the suspension.
  3. KX50002

    KX50002 NooB, my ass

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    I'd go with the squirrel.


    sent from a device designed specifically to annoy scottrnelson YES I do know how to change it, just never bothered as I was too busy riding my motorcycle.
  4. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen

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    Even if he did touch down, he had PLENTY of room to ease up the lean if needed and still make the turn. Even if he was dragging parts he probably could have maintained the press and lean and made the turn. Looking at the camera didn't help, because he was already to far too the right in his lane to properly set up for the turn. Had be been nearer the centerline in his lane it would have given him more turn to work with.

    I agree, he target fixated, first at the camera and then at the car, failed to look right, maintain a lean and stay on the throttle to make the turn. It's interesting that the Vette was already heading for the shoulder even before he was completely over the centerline. My guess is the Vette driver saw him coming bad WAY earlier than the bike rider saw the Vette.

    Simply put, it was all his fault. But I wonder what his take is on the event?
    Is he one of those, "I crashed the bike and there was nothing I coudl do about it?"

    Or maybe, "I need to get a lot more training, because obviously I don't know how to handle a corner."
  5. KX50002

    KX50002 NooB, my ass

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    Nothing he could do about it?
    Sheeit, he coulda laid er down.:wink:
  6. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    I can't imagine riding just looking into the distance. I ride with my eyes flicking constantly between as far down the road as I can, to the near, to the actual road just about to pass under my front tire. The latter especially so when I'm cranked over in a high speed turn. I want to anticipate how the bike is going to react to irregularities in the road before it happens, not just go shit that was a big pothole after its completely unsettled the bike, or wow that dip that launched me of the seat unexpectedly was kinda fun.

    Actually the more I think about it the less I get the idea of focusing solely on the vanishing point. Your riding the classic motorcycle road of twistie sharp mountain bends. This will vary from you can't see around the next corner, to within a second perhaps you can completely see the next 2 if not 3 corners as the road winds back on itself. Who would ride around the next 2 corners focusing on the vanishing point 3 turns ahead. You need as much awareness as you can of where the road is going, the corner your in and the next if possible, and the road surface your about to take these corners on.
  7. catweasel67

    catweasel67 Honda XRV 750 RD04

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    I appear to be the opposite of JohnCW - in that I never look at the road that's just in front me - I doubt if I'd react well to anything suddenly appearing under my wheels anyway - so I tend to scan the road from about 50m (and behind via the mirrors) to the vanishing point. - just bear in mind that the road's vanishing point isn't necessarily where you actually want to be - unless it's a one way road :evil.

    It's been a long time since I've run wide in a corner, but I remember well what it was like and it was, for me, a valuable lesson(s) and one, I hope, that I learned - slow in, fast out. Look where you want to go. Don't fixate.

    Don't forget the mistakes you made.
  8. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    At speed looking close is a waste. You're already there and what's done is done. If you see something it's something you should have seen already.
  9. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    You don't stand the bike up for a split second in a turn to avoid that last second unseen big nasty pothole, or get the bike as vertical as possible over that unexpected wet patch or relatively small loose surface country road repair?

    How do you know the corner your ripping into on that shaded country road in the high country is 'green' and you'd better go light on the throttle and keep the bike as upright as possible if your not constantly casting an eye on the road surface?

    I sort of try to get as good a view of the road surface as this bloke.

    [​IMG]

    Obviously the above picture is meant as a bit of a joke. But as I thought about this some more, GP riders constantly one after another will hit a corner ripple strip within an inch of each other. They are not getting this result by looking solely up the road. I'm doing largely exactly the same thing when riding fast though corners, constantly and closely monitoring my position to the 'ripple strip' which may be a 2 inch jagged drop-off to a dirt shoulder. How anyone can take a fast line through a corner getting as close to the 'ripple strip' as they safely can without closely monitoring the distance (which means glancing down out of the corner of your eye) and adjusting their line accordingly is lost on me.
  10. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Peripheral vision my friend. Develop it and then trust it. It exists up and down as well as side to side. But always maintain you focus ahead.

    And damn I wish I could do that.
  11. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    It seems to me we're actually in agreement that you need a good awareness of everything going on around you (near/far, left/right, front/back) and we're just exploring the best way to achieve all of this, and what we'll call it. To me this seems quite different to the concept that started this bit of the discussion which was focusing on the vanishing point to the near exclusion of all other aspects of road position and riding technique.
  12. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Oh I don't follow or remember everything said here. Too much arguing.

    And yes it would seem awareness of one's surroundings and keen knowledge of both the bike's capabilities as well as your own go a long ways in keeping insurance rates down. So in that we are on the same page.
  13. atomicalex

    atomicalex silly aluminum boxes

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    Gatorback.