The CRF250L Owners thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by joec63, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. gnath9

    gnath9 Been here awhile

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    Yes it will add a little off the line .... break loose the nuts first is what I have read ... my sprockets are in the mail and its fricken cold outside :freaky
  2. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    Very interesting developments....making parameter #1 = 0 Helps the stalling...can't imagine why...but it's progress....
  3. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    TO: KRONO and Everyone else

    I just nuked all my stupid comments about two O2 sensors.....I won't even stoop so low as to blame Honda for poorly captioning and labeling the picture. Soooo stupid of me!
  4. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    Seeing as my Husaberg wasn't available, I recently rode back to Death Valley and then explored mostly off tarmac having a great time on the stock LRP, no Nancy this time.
    It did great and took many miles of very rough riding in stride, surprising me how much you can push this bike without breaking something. From interstate travels to gnarly rock gardens I found the engine to be just fine with plenty of power to have fun, matter of fact it's very obvious the motor has finally loosened up and is making much more power than when it was new. On a side note for people feeling like they need to go spend a bunch of cash trying to make their bike "faster" I suggest you go put some miles on it first, it does improve with no money spent with miles.

    The main limiting factor on this bike for me to go faster was only the suspension.
    For the most part I had no problem keeping up with good riders on very fast bikes, but when pushing the bike's limits trying to haul ass on very rough terrain while loaded with lots of extra fuel and camping gear it was easy to bottom it out, especially in whoops, sudden washouts, and big rock gardens. This is to be expected with the budget OEM suspension that's probably designed more for milder DS use and not for fast desert riding.
    With that said I'm not sure I'll be spending much money beyond a damper since Nancy won't be pushing the performance limits of the bike and riding more along the lines of it's intended design and for that it's just fine how it is IMO. I surely wouldn't buy any of the current suspension upgrades that are available at this time.
    In the end I had a great time on the LRP regardless of it's softer feel and think this is one great bike capable of long distance touring, or going any place off road that just about any dirt bike can.

    With a 13T sprocket I averaged 38 MPG for the trip and had the capacity to carry about 7 gallons of fuel total, making the 250 miles between gas on 350+ mile dirt rides possible. Top speed was with a backwind going downhill at 89mph, on the highway cruising 67MPH was average, 60 going uphill in 5th gear, 75 going downhill. Pretty much wide open throttle most of the time on the highway, especially with strong head winds. I hope they make that IMS tank pretty big, while the advertised numbers are good for MPG, in the real world it doesn't get very good milage unless you're just poking along a country road @50 mph, at least for us. A little over 1000 miles in 3 days of pure riding heaven on the Little Red Piggy (that can and did!)


    Go LRP!


    -Finn



    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/58411544?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="1279" height="719" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/58411544">Death Valley Daze</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/lostrider">Lost Rider</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>




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  5. siyeh

    siyeh Lawn Nazi

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    good to see that lil bike take a pounding and liking it

    great vid thanks
  6. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    LOST RIDER: Yup....some rough stuff, and it looks like the "Econo-suspension" really was unphased by it. BUT...it brings up the shock mod question. Way back on my Suzuki DRZ400s (street model) with the stock shock (no rebound damping adjust) I was doing a long downhill with some serious waterbars going across the downhill slope....there was SOOOO much rebound damping, I damn near did a handstand off the bars. After that experience I found a DRZ400 shock from an E model with rebound damping adjust, and the rear suspension instantly became wonderful...no more near-death experiences. So...in your experiences on the LRP....if the shock were rebuildable/tuneable (Honda sez no....my local shock guru says PROBABLY), does the rebound damping need to be toned down?....someone here upped his rear spring rate to 600 from about 525.....would that have been a benefit on this ride?
  7. Harcomo

    Harcomo Been here awhile

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    I just finished this combination awhile ago and it turned out fine. It wasn't that tough of a job if you take your time and use the correct tools.....and read the thread here and ask questions if you need to. There are members here that are willing to help. I've had the 13T JT front sprocket on for some time but today installed the 42T JT rear sprocket from The Sprocket Center. Fitment was spot on. I now need to recalibrate my Speedo DRD to get the speedometer reading correctly. Now for some warm weather to test it out. I'm betting it's going to be just right now gearing wise for me anyway!
  8. 'Flagger

    'Flagger ..this space for rent..

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    :wave

    that was me. but I weigh 230 in my birfday suit.
  9. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    I'm close to that with gear...hmmmm....spring shopping in the spring????
  10. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    I didn't see the spring rate as being the issue, I'm not a heavy guy and the extra fuel on back weighs more than my all camping gear, most of the time the softer suspension was fine, just seemed like it could use a hell of a lot more compression damping. I'm not a suspension Guru though, I have state of the art WP closed cartridge suspension setup by someone that is a Guru on my Berg', only making small adjustments for various rides whether I'm loaded or not, or if know I'll be in either soft terrain or rock garden trails. Most of the time I leave it somewhere in the middle so it works everywhere because I like to get around. :evil
    I ride, not fiddle with things much.

    The main reason I say I wouldn't buy any of the current available choices is they don't have remote preload and still charge top dollar, same I've paid for Ohlins with remote preload. If I'm going to spend $800 on a shock, it's going to be Gold.
    If we got new suspension it would get sprung for Nancy, but I would have to have the ability to easily crank up the preload for when she's carrying camping gear, or I'm riding the bike, no sense in paying to make compromises IMHO. We can wait, or just buy a higher performance bike when the time comes to drop a couple grand or more into this one...
    I'm sure it would greatly improve the handling, but as you can see, it's doing OK without spending big bucks and is just fine for Nancy to grow into a great dirt bike rider. Lost Rider tested. :deal

    What saved me from crashing more than anything was having proper knobby tires on, I couldn't have done what I did without incident on the OEM tires or most DS tires.

    About 1:43 into the video I slowed down 4 seconds when I hit a 3' wide very deep hole with square edges, luckily I was going fast enough and in the right gear to be able to get the front wheel over it. That hit was devastating, broke my tool tube off, and I've never broke one of those on other bikes with many rough miles. I'm sure better suspension would have helped there since it blew threw the soft rear shock with not enough compression instantly sending the rear wheel up a couple of feet and me doing a handstand on the bars after the shock bottomed out from the force of the hit. Nothing else broke though, I didn't even bent a wheel on this ride. :deal

    Go LRP!



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  11. Jinksy

    Jinksy - Jinksy

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    Did you notice a difference with just changing out the 14T to the 13T? Is it a significant difference with the 42T? Does the front sprocket change alone affect the speedometer reading?
  12. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    Lost Rider:

    Your video, and your commentary confirm that this bike, just as it is, possibly excepting tires, is capable of performing at a seriously high level, that a huge number of riders can only start to approach. "Ride, not fiddle" sums it up. Thanks
  13. Harcomo

    Harcomo Been here awhile

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    The first thing I thought when I took my first ride on this bike was that it was awfully high geared, especially in first gear. The 13T sprocket alone helped somewhat but not enough for how I'll use the bike. I felt I needed lower gearing yet and hopefully the 42T will get me there. I haven't ridden it yet after the rear sprocket change so maybe others that have done both will chime in. And yes, any change you make to front or rear sprockets is going to throw off your speedometer reading. But that is an easy fix with the Speedo DRD.....about $75 if you want your speedometer to read as it should.

    http://www.crfsonly.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/290_294/products_id/4746
  14. Jinksy

    Jinksy - Jinksy

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    Has anyone used Filtered Air Box Vents after drilling holes in the air box? If so, how did it improve the performance?
  15. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    Thanks Ed.

    My purpose of posting the video and comments in general isn't to say how fast I am or on a high level, far from it, I'm an intermediate rider, never raced, no trophies, no rallies, no nothing but some miles under my belt, but motorcycling is a top priority in my/our life, along with making photos. Lots of fast guys out there, I'm not one of them... My point with many of my posts from my own experience is that this Honda is more than capable of doing what most any rider who would buy one could need. I'm not even saying better or worse than any other comparable bike, it's a very capable bike in many ways.
    I understand being snowed in, I understand when I don't have the time to ride it's best to talk about it, or shop around and spend time throwing money at making a bike better. I get it, trust me.
    The reality is most any DS bike most folks could buy the owner can't ride it to it's mechanical peak performance or even close. I know my Berg' is capable of much more beyond my skills, but I hope to grow into it. Sure, nice suspension or more power is great, anodized bling is seductive, planning for the what-ifs, spending time when you wish you were riding researching mods or what will be "best" way to setup your bike is a great way to pass the time in between rides, better than watching reality TV at least. Come this summer when I'm too busy working and not riding for months at a time I'll be yearning for saddle time myself. But in the end, it's up to the rider to grown and learn, to train your body to ride, to get good muscle memory for all motorbike controls or reaction time when you FEEL something, to train you butt to take long days in the saddle, etc, etc. There's only so much a person can buy to go faster or be safer, most of the issues are the nut holding onto the handlebars, at least has been for me. I didn't think one bit about what I needed to do to the LRP on this last ride when I got home to have more fun, just enjoyed what I had.

    I'm all for making a bike your own, making it fit you both physically and esthetically, but in the end, especially for new or out of practice DS riders IMHO the best money you could spend on the LRP after you have it fitting you properly and protected would be for professional training like with Jimmy Lewis, or at least making having seat time a priority if possible. Commuting is seat time, even if not on trails. By all means if it's no big deal to your budget or what make you happy, spend away squeezing all you can out of the motor, or get the nice suspension, but nobody NEEDS to do anything beyond making the LRP theirs to make them go faster on it, or at the very least have FUN.

    I really enjoyed my time on the LRP, looking forward to many fun miles for us on this bike.
    Just my 2¢. :1drink
  16. Rider1

    Rider1 Ridin' Dave

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    Well said LR !! And I agree, not that that matters much, totally .

    Dave



  17. positron007

    positron007 Adventurer

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    Has anyone here owned both an XR400R and the CRF250L
    I like the XR400R for it's light weight, bigger fuel tank, and obviously greater horsepower and torque.
    I like the CRF250L because for a new bike it is very cheap, and I suppose fuel injected motor, and easy to find.
    I reckon I would like the XR more but I like the peace of mind of a new bike.
    Any advice would be appreciated
  18. mtntrails

    mtntrails Been here awhile

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  19. Tjilpi

    Tjilpi Adventurer

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    Chiang Mai, Thailand
    My two bobs worth.

    Two of us recently rode 3000 mms through northern Thailand and Laos, each on CRF250Ls.
    See report http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=858200&highlight=Laos+bucket+list


    We rode all sorts of roads but no 'hard-core' dirt/mud tracks (at 65 years of age I can justifiably say, 'been there, done that' to that one).

    Both bike performed brilliantly.
    Mine was new, starting the journey at 1,600 kms.
    My mate's bike had 13,000+ kms on it at the start of the journey.

    Great suspension.
    200 km range.
    Adequate power for all we encountered.
    No extra oil or coolant was added.
    No punctures.

    Both bikes were stock standard.

    A good summary came from my riding partner; "I respect this little bike more after the journey than before."
    I agreed.
  20. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    I currently have both. Owned the XR since 1996 when it was new. Tried many other bikes to replace the XR. They are all gone. The faults of the XR are weak AC electrical system that won't run heated grips and electric vest for a 67 year old old fart. Plus it's not electric start...and it NEVER started well cold.

    The CRF was purchased to deal with these issues, has a great price, and be lighter than my KLR650. I've put significant miles on a WR250R. Great engine...didn't like the suspension or the ergonomics. PM me if you have specific questions. I will NOT be getting rid of the XR400.