The CRF250L Owners thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by joec63, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. G19Tony

    G19Tony Been here awhile

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    After your earlier post about a steering damper, I looked into it, and it will be on the list of things to do. Handling is more important than extra power for me. Extra power just means I crash faster. :huh
  2. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    Right on! :lol3

    Think of a steering damper as an anti crash add on, I know mine has saved me countless times when hitting those sneaky big rocks that jump out at you, or when stuck riding hundreds of miles of sand whoops.



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  3. miles44

    miles44 Adventurer

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    Thanks for the info guys :) Im also more interested in handling over speed. I will pro start out with different, more street oriented, tires. The steering damper looks good but a bit too $ for me right now. Maybe when it comes available for the 250l i will be able to afford it lol. But i would love to have some insight on some good trails to ride. Was planning on heading up the coast soon. Will pro take you up on that offer lost rider :)
  4. DirtyBlackIrish

    DirtyBlackIrish Been here awhile

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    I also looked into it from you earlier post. Looks like they didn't make their Christmas time-frame but I'm patient. From your past experience, what kind of $ range are these SD's? Also, have you ever found and exhaust replacement that isn't so loud as the FMF? I have about 2500 on mine now and am looking for tires here soon. I do about 70% on road for commute and then trail and double track/logging roads up here in Washington. Any suggestions as I am also new to this endeavor and zero experience with parts replacement yet?


    ***EDIT***

    I found the prices on their site for the steering stabilizers. Looks to be in the $400 range give or take. Not to bad considering what you get. I imagine money well spent.
  5. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    I think the Scott's is about $450, won't know for sure until they release it but with the type of mount they will be using that price should be close.


    As for tires, I have a different way of looking at it...

    lets say a DS tire, for example a Shinko 705 is considered a 80/20 tire. Most people would say it's a 80% road, 20% dirt tire.
    I don't see it as a representation of percentages of how much time/miles you'lI spend on either terrain. I see those numbers as representing it's 80% as good as a full street tire and 20% as good as a full race knobby on their respective terrains.
    I would rate the OEM LRP tires as 70/30 tires, OK on street, so-so on dirt, better than a Battlewing, Shinko 705, TKC-80, Tourance, etc. on dirt but not as good off tarmac as a D606, or a Pirelli Rally Pro, or a Mitas e09.

    Tires are so subjective it's hard to really say what's best for you, I ride mostly in dry, rocky terrain with very little mud. You probably have more dirt and mud where as I have more rocks and sand.
    You have to decide if you want the best traction for your off tarmac adventure and deal with the pavement shortcomings and faster wear, or get a better commuting tire that will last longer but suck more in dirt and be horrible in mud.

    Personally, on a DS bike I go with better tires for off road, one saved crash and not getting injured when off tarmac is worth the extra cost of running more dirt orientated DS and riding them on pavement. But I also don't ride in wet weather much around here and have multiple bike with different tires so that's also something to consider for your location, knobby tires are not good on wet tarmac and take a little extra care to ride safely with.

    If I had to recommend tires it would be a set of D606's if you want much better dirt traction and more than adequate (dry) tarmac handling, they are the best all around DS tire IMO, works well in everything around the country in my travels . If you wanted a good, cheap, long lasting DS tire geared more towards street it would be a Shinko 705 from my experience. They wear like iron.

    You can run a D606 front with a 705 rear for a good compromise too. Done that many times on my GS.

    The other option would be to get a set of each and a set of tire irons and swap out tires for respective rides. Not only will you save money, but in short time you'll be very fast at swapping them and have the skills needed to fix a flat trailside...

    Or run a combo with knobby front and DS rear and just swap the rear when you want to play in the dirt.

    Lots of options, and only you can decide what you want.... then try something else next time and so on and so on and so on.

    Getting one of these is a wise investment too for anyone and makes changing tires trailside easier. Like crashing a bike, it's when, not if you'll get a flat someday...

    http://www.endurostar.com


    Good luck!

    -Finn
  6. GaryHarris

    GaryHarris I bent my Flounder

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    Sorry to interrupt, but those won't last on a bike. Too much amp draw and they aren't designed for a continuous charge. They might work for awhile, but I wouldn't use them and I have been into RC for over 20 years.
  7. Rad_Leo

    Rad_Leo Adventurer

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    I live in Santa Clarita and ride my LRP in rowher flats weekly (3 times this week). Send me a message and we'll shred some time.
  8. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    sure sounds like under inflated tire, out of balance tire, loose axle, loose fork legs in the triple clamps, or loose stem bearings in the triple clamps. Poke around on the web for videos or whatever to learn how to check these things. It'll be very handy to have a helper to hold things, and a work stand to put under the skid plate. Most magazine road tests say the CRF is very good at speed without headshake....so what you are experiencing is absolutely abnormal.
  9. Telemarktumalo

    Telemarktumalo Go Red Sox!

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    I can see running the LRP occasionally at high speed, but commuting routinely at 70-80 mph, is asking a bit much of a 250 single. Obviously, the little Honda will do it, but I would suggest a more street oriented 2, 3 or 4 cylinder 500 cc + bike.
  10. Rad_Leo

    Rad_Leo Adventurer

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    Been following this thread for a while now. Proud owner of the LRP since early November. This is my first attempt at posting pictures, so I hope it works.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/91977842@N06/8355978851/" title="image by Rad_leo, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8366/8355978851_5dc9bd19e1.jpg" width="500" height="500" alt="image"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/91977842@N06/8355978785/" title="image by Rad_leo, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8513/8355978785_12ce43b3bd.jpg" width="375" height="500" alt="image"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/91977842@N06/8355978829/" title="image by Rad_leo, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8054/8355978829_399c227ce5.jpg" width="375" height="500" alt="image"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/91977842@N06/8355978903/" title="image by Rad_leo, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8514/8355978903_db8b96ca0a.jpg" width="375" height="500" alt="image"></a>
  11. Rad_Leo

    Rad_Leo Adventurer

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    That was relatively easy, so here are two more for the night

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/91977842@N06/8357184386/" title="image by Rad_leo, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8236/8357184386_11471506ee.jpg" width="500" height="374" alt="image"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/91977842@N06/8357184416/" title="image by Rad_leo, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8046/8357184416_849fcc725c.jpg" width="500" height="374" alt="image"></a>
  12. DirtyBlackIrish

    DirtyBlackIrish Been here awhile

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    Nice pics!
  13. miles44

    miles44 Adventurer

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    Yeah sounds true. Should pro stick to the side streets when commuting (so easy to do here in LA). But still feel uneasy about the whole headshake thing. Want to make sure its not a pro with my bike you know. :)
  14. Krono

    Krono Speed Junkie

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    Thank's for your reply, Gary

    As i know i can dischage them at 30C (70A) with 10sec burst at 60C (2.3 x 60 = 138A), that may be enough here.
    What i dont know, is if (like you say), they can handle continuous charging.
    But that let me optimistic --> http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=16159440&postcount=28

    Although this little bike is perfect for me in both city and countryside, it's a bit on the heavy side to when comes tricky off-road, i must admit.
    Anyway, i'd rather stick with her instead going the expensive/high maintenance KTM's way, so i try all i can to make her more managable for me when offroading, still keeping his daily-driver functionality.

    If i cant ... i'll go straight to a 2 stroker, he he !

    L
  15. gregitt

    gregitt Adventurer

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    I thought I mentioned, I burned a hole in my jeans the first day! I was able to take off the old Heat Shield and use it by making a bracket out of steel similar to the existing one and purchasing a clamp, screw and nut for the new clamp. I have photos of the process, but I guess I have to learn to use photobucket or something to post pics here. You can also purchase a carbon heat shield from E-Bay ($130) and another cheaper one (not too good). for less than $20.00. If I can figure out how to put my photos on a site, I will post them.....FREE is ok!
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  16. Brandon805

    Brandon805 Get the camera

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    Hey Lost,

    I'm out in Thousand Oaks and ride to Ventura for fun fairly frequently. I'd be pretty interested in finding some nice places to go :D

    Brandon
  17. Lost Rider

    Lost Rider Roadie

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    I don't know, while it's possible and those are all logical things to check, I know our LRP is setup correctly and at 70-80 it gets shaky. Not much shake under 70 at all with no wind and perfect tarmac, but when going above 70 it's different. On grooved or rougher roads I still get some wobble at anything over 50, that's something a damper would help with. But also I have balanced my wheels. I think "very good at speed" is subjective, and without more specifics we just don't know how fast that actually means.
    While commuting on freeways in LA is possible it can't be what the designers at Honda had in mind when they made this bike.
    If he gets a lots of shake or wobble under 70 I would be sure it's setup correctly, but asking this bike with the OEM tires to be stable at 80mph might be asking too much, or the fellow just isn't used to the "looser" ride one gets on a small DS bike with kind of knobby tires.







    Nice photo Rad! That place looks familiar... :evil
  18. trainman

    trainman Been here awhile

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    Just wondering, do motorcycle tires have speed rating like car tires, or if they are DOT approved, is that for a set speed. I would think that each tire would have a speed rating set by the mfg.

    John
  19. MentalGuru

    MentalGuru Crazy Diamond

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    Yes they are load and speed rated.
  20. Ed@Ford

    Ed@Ford Long timer

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    Nicely done!