the DR200 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by klxrdr, May 13, 2007.

  1. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,774
    Location:
    Osoyoos, BC
    Definitely runs in oil, just like just about every other motorcycle does. Only ones I can think of that don't are BMWs and the new Triumph Tiger 1200.
  2. Sateev

    Sateev Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2010
    Oddometer:
    124
    Location:
    Thailand
    Well, finally finished my Trailtech Vapor install, after living with a cold-blooded speedo for what seemed like forever. I'm happy with the results, learned a lot doing it, and no worries about changing front tire sizes: I can re-calibrate it with a couple of button presses...

    To give a bit of background:

    My old speedo was sticky: it wouldn't move off zero, unless it had been sitting in direct sunlight for a few minutes, despite the fact that it is normally 32-40 degrees C here in Bangkok. I wanted a nice electronic speedo, but didn't want a Mickey Mouse ignition mount tab leaving the switch highly exposed. Additionally, I wanted a 12V power port (Powerlet!) to power my GPS, and the whole thing had to look somewhat neat.

    So, I decided to design my own mount.

    I found a great (if somewhat pricey) service called emachineshop.com. They have easy-to-use CAD software that will not only let you easily design parts, but will render them in 3D, check their manufacturability, and quote prices for the part.

    Here's the final design:
    [​IMG]

    The hole with the keyway accepts the stock ignition switch, which snaps in place. The hole to the left is for the Powerlet Low-profile 12V power socket, The four mounting holes are secured by the four handlebar clamp bolts, and the two holes at the business end match the rubber grommets supplied by Trailtech in their mounting kit for the speedo. The hole on the tab (originally bent 90 deg.) is for a threaded insert, which accepts a screw through the number plate. It turned out to be unnecessary. More on this later.

    The material I chose is 6061-T6 aluminum, .125" thick, with a mild brushed finish, because it is tough, and very machinable. I could have saved a bit by going with 5052-T5, but I HATE that stuff. It's soft, greasy-feeling, and I DON'T LIKE IT! Grabs drill bits, and tries to yank the drill from your hands. Yech!

    Here is a picture of the bracket, before anodizing (and before I trimmed the tab off):

    [​IMG]

    Here's a side view of the bracket I had to tweak (note the tab is bent at about 105 degrees, and the threaded insert is in place), next to the raw, un-tweaked bracket:

    [​IMG]

    I originally wasn't sure how stiff the bracket would be, and whether or not it would vibrate with the weight of the speedo and indicators out on the end, so I designed it with a third mounting point, the tab, just in case. Since I used paper dolls to model everything for fit, I misjudged the angle, and had the tab bent to 90 deg., when it really needed to be 105 deg. Turns out to be quite stiff, though, so it's not worth having to drill a hole in the number plate for the extra mounting point.

    I just lopped off the end.

    Here's what the bracket SHOULD be like, without the tab:

    [​IMG]

    I sent the trimmed bracket out for anodizing (gold color) to a local shop.

    After re-wiring the indicator lights on the Trailtech bezel to plug into the stock harness, and running wires for the 12V Powerlet, I assembled everything. I used slightly longer stainless hex cap screws for the handlebar clamps, to allow for the extra thickness of the bracket, and used a bit of anti-seize to prevent galling.

    Here's the result:

    [​IMG]

    With the brake hose and speedo sensor wire held out of the way:

    [​IMG]

    Showing the cable/hose routing:

    [​IMG]

    The weatherproof lid of the Powerlet socket:

    [​IMG]

    (The plastic hose on the crossbar is the 'friction mount' for my Garmin GPS62s GPS bracket)

    I had intended to use a very slick sensor, made by Acewell, which would bolt directly into the speedo gear housing on the front wheel, but it is a different type of sensor (Hall), where the Trailtech uses a reed switch and brake rotor bolt magnet. I have designed an interface black box for the Acewell sensor, and when all the parts arrive, I will see if it works.

    For now, I just lopped off the fitting from the stock speedo cable, filled the hole, and put it back to keep dirt and water out. Nothing wrong with the reed-switch, but I would prefer that the cable runs in the stock location...

    So, that's it - it works. I still have a bit of tidying up to do (the flap that covers the wiring under the number plate has lost all it's velcro, and the wires are a bit too visible).

    I won't cover the wiring here, except to say that the indicator lamps supplied with the Trailtech 'dashboard' (optional accessory) are disappointingly wimpy, even with the supposedly brighter LEDs that they supply. I even got some super-bright, triple-LED replacements, but it's still too dim in the daytime. I might have to do a re-design to mount my own indicators, but not anytime soon. If anyone else wants to try this, please PM me AND post here, and I will try to help with the wiring.

    The Vapor unit itself is pretty cool, easy to set up, and has a lot more features than I will actually use. Things like shift lights, max temp recording, max rpm recording, max speed recording, etc.

    I'm still diddling around with getting the tach to work properly, and haven't installed the temp sensor permanently, but it's all coming together.

    At least I know how fast I'm going...

    Note: no Suzuki wiring harnesses were harmed in the production of this modification.

    Have fun.
  3. MorganSS

    MorganSS Texan

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2012
    Oddometer:
    81
    Location:
    Kerrville Texas
    Sateev why dont you post some cool pics from the area you live? I like stuff like that. :D
  4. MorganSS

    MorganSS Texan

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2012
    Oddometer:
    81
    Location:
    Kerrville Texas

    usually they thank you by pissing all over your hands when you touch them lol

    I will always try and help a turtle across a street, but then I go to my parents lake house and shoot them with pellets because they are harmful to the bass. Go figure. :D
  5. ben2go

    ben2go Moto Flunky

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2011
    Oddometer:
    4,061
    Location:
    Upstate SC USA
    All Suzuki charging rotors run in oil.No issue.It helps to oil the starting gears and starter clutch.
  6. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

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    Nov 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,774
    Location:
    Osoyoos, BC
    Very clean, nice job! :thumb That link to the machine shop could cost me some money.
  7. Sateev

    Sateev Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2010
    Oddometer:
    124
    Location:
    Thailand
    Thanks, Bross.

    Emachineshop.com is pretty cool. If you're just making one part, it's kind of expensive, granted, but not that much more than if you went to a shop (including set up time). The software is so slick, however, with the ability to make changes easily, print out at 1:1 so you can make paper dolls to try, and to render the design in 3D, with rotate, that, for me, it made up for the cost. Also, if you make more parts, the cost per part goes down quickly, since most of the price is set up. (I made 4 brackets). They also have an online store, where you can put your creations up for sale.

    Have fun.
  8. bross

    bross Where we riding to?

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,774
    Location:
    Osoyoos, BC
    That's very cool and once you make the part, that makes it so simple to crank out extra's for someone else wanting the same part.
  9. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

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    Nov 19, 2005
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    103,472
    Location:
    right here on my thermarest
  10. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    103,472
    Location:
    right here on my thermarest
  11. Bud11

    Bud11 n00b

    Joined:
    May 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    6
    Location:
    South of Denver
    New tires? I need to replace my stock tires with some knobbies on my 2002 DR200. What are you running and what sizes? Thanks. Bud
  12. Wallrat

    Wallrat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    837
    Location:
    Orange County, Ca
    110/90-18, thought they were TR8's but IRC does their sizes in imperial. Maybe a D745 non-DOT?
  13. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
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    103,472
    Location:
    right here on my thermarest

    This.
  14. Wallrat

    Wallrat Been here awhile

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    Oct 8, 2011
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    Location:
    Orange County, Ca
    I'm not that good, I just know how to use the forum search hehe.
  15. tomas377

    tomas377 n00b

    Joined:
    May 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    7
    short introduction
    hi im tomas i got my dr200 bout 2 months ago and this is my first motorcycle and im using it currently for going to school and running around town. Im from the houston area also.

    pros/why i got it
    its small nimble and since i used to ride dirt bikes not total unfamiliar territory and it can go offroad and since im an outdoors guy this was a big plus.im 20 and about 5'8'' and 130lbs and didnt find any other dual sports that i was comfortable on with it also being a first bike.and i really like suzuki(also used to ride a rm250.

    cons
    because of the size and weight highway use isnt what i wish it was and model specific after market stuff are hard to find. and the sound lol i kinda wish it was more warmer and deeper.

    the only customizing ive done to the bike are adding a black tinted slipstreamer windshield and trackside hand guards.

    now some advice/questions

    when adding the hand guards i found out they plugged the ends of the bars so i used a 9/16 on the ends so i could get the bar end mounts which was a pain in the ass attached.now my throttle feels a little lighter but if i let it go from being open about 1/2 way it stays there unless i physically close it. i never just let my throttle go but i just dont really like the feel of it.im thinking about changing the bars out since i dont like them that much anyway.

    Are there and weighted bar ends i can use with some aftermarket bars that i can also use along with the hand guards that bolt into the end??? you know to clean up the look at have the throttle smoother.

    also what are some stuff i can do to make my DR more highway friendly? im open to as much ideas as i can get no matter how small and miniscule lol.

    also whats some stuff i can do as far as lighting to help it be more visible at night?ideas?

    and other than manracks and happytrails what are some other options for luggage?

    btw my bikes an 09 first owner
  16. Wallrat

    Wallrat Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    837
    Location:
    Orange County, Ca
    If you're talking about local highways then the DR is a fun little bike to cruise around town and do some simple riding in the dirt. If you intend on taking it on the freeway then I'd reconsider. Not to say that it can't be done but a 200 is really anemic for freeway speeds. My wife's DR tops out around 60mph with my 230~lbs on it, which is about 10mph short of the slow lane around here. At 130lbs, you won't be as grossly affected by hills and headwind but you'll still be asking a lot of a small engine if you gear it high enough to maintain freeway speeds.

    Offroad the DR is a happy little trail bike, but I'd avoid the hairy stuff that your 250 ate up. Keep in mind that the DR weighs a good 20% more than the RM and doesn't have the suspension you're used to for soaking up jumps or big ruts.

    Coming from a RM250 I'd hardly consider yourself a rank beginner. That 250 had about the same amount of horsepower as most 4-stroke bikes in the 450-500cc range and a much more abrupt delivery at that. The DR is a whole different kind of bike, which can be good or bad depending on your riding style.

    The stock handlebars are very heavy, so upgrading them isn't a bad idea. I just ordered some Pro Tapers for my wife's bike along with one of those ultralight Ballistic Evo2 batteries. I'll be weighing the before and after and post my results.

    For the exhaust, FMF Q4 has a nice tone and is still below the legal decibel limit - plus its quite a bit lighter than stock. There's a link to it on page 1 of this thread as well as a kientech jet kit that will save you some time with finding the right jetting.

    If you haven't already done it, replace the stock petcock. Lots of info on that in this thread, just go back a few pages.
  17. tkent02

    tkent02 Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,985
    Location:
    Littleton, CO
    I'm picturing this bike with a load of camping gear on the back, knobbiest and a bash plate, maybe a tool tube, a little windscreen and a few ADV stickers here and there...
    And some Siberian looking mountains in the background.
  18. JayGoldstein

    JayGoldstein Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2012
    Oddometer:
    72
    Location:
    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
    Got the bike back from the 1,000 km service and noticed that the oil level is above the "F" line. In fact, oil extends to the top of the sight glass when the bike is straight up. The manual says to add 950 ml of oil after an oil and filter change. I suspect that the technician added a full litre of oil.

    Are there harmful consequences of overfilling the crankcase by 50 ml? Should I siphon out the excess oil?
  19. Klay

    Klay dreaming adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    103,472
    Location:
    right here on my thermarest
    The top of the sight glass is overfilled, but not really to an extreme. If it's overfilled to the point where the crank is churning the oil, the oil will get frothy with air and bubbly oil doesn't protect bearing surfaces so well. Or so I was told.
  20. Highaltidude

    Highaltidude Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    Oddometer:
    71
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, CO
    I keep a $.99 kitchen baster in the garage just for removing oil when it's overfilled......
    Don't know if that would work on the DR.....

    Chuck